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Using maps storyboard part 4
 

Using maps storyboard part 4

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Using Maps

Using Maps
E-Learning Storyboard
AET/541
Professor Melvin Hagan

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  • Segment 1 – What is LatitudePre-training vocabulary and content with corresponding visuals in order to utilize latitude to analyze maps
  • Screen 1
  • Segment 1 – What is LatitudePre-training vocabulary and content with corresponding visuals in order to utilize latitude to analyze maps
  • Instructional Segmentation: Using latitude, latitude and the environment, and using longitude
  • (Screen 2) Though there is an obvious intent of the order (program controlled) that the learner should follow in doing this activity, but more importantly, the learner controls the ability to review the material. If the learner after (especially after doing the “putting it all together” activity or in doing the collaborative activity) does not feel comfortable with an element of the process he or she can easily go back and review the material, method, and instruction. The activity is initially program controlled but any review that is needed is completely learner controlled.
  • Learner Control: the pace of instruction is entirely learner controlled with the ability to click on the terms to get the definition and see the term labeled on the graphic. It is also self paced so the learner can go on to the exercise when he or she is ready. (True for all content screens)
  • The integration of the graphic and text of the ladder next to the globe gives the user an image to associate with new vocabulary. Each of the vocabulary words, when scrolled over, will have a graphic appear (shown here with the parallels) with the pop-up text that corresponds with the term, showing the user how to apply the term. Following the contiguity principle (Clark and Mayer, 2011) the words and terms are near the corresponding graphics.Screen 4
  • Learner Control: the learner has the navigation ability to go back to the previous screen if he or she needs to review the terms in order to do the exercise, however the learner can not go on to the next activity or section without answering the question and getting feedback. (True for all question slides)
  • Segment 2 – How does latitude help us know about a locationPre-training vocabulary and content with corresponding visuals in order to utilize latitude to analyze mapsPersonalization – use of words like “us” and “we” makes the user feel as though he or she is working with someone on a task together.
  • Personalization and reflection within the feedback and self-explanation help students relate to the content. Students will ask the question, “how does this information apply to the world I live in?”Question screen links back to content for help and forward back to the introductory slide.
  • Segment 3 – How to use longitudePre-training vocabulary and content with corresponding visuals in order to utilize longitude to analyze maps and find absolute locations.
  • Personalization – conversational and encouraging tones within the feed back encourage students. In the “wrong” answer, there is an element of reflection to help students find the error to correct it phrased in a positive manner.Question screen links back to content for help and forward back to the introductory slide.
  • Full Example – goes to faded examples. Removes 1 or 2 steps at a time in different contexts to cement the skill for the student. Each faded example links back to the step by step instructions for help. The learner is in complete control of the pace of the exercise and is able to go back and review these steps if at any point he or she needs to. As Clark and Mayer suggests, access to learner support helps students cement the concepts as they engage in the practices.
  • Faded Example #1 – removes the last step
  • Faded Example #2 – removes steps 3 and 4, but maintains the task at hand.
  • Faded Example #3 – removes steps 1 and 2 but maintains the task at hand
  • Faded Example #4/Full Practice Exercise – Immediate feedback for student assessment of objective.The full practice exercise provides the learner as much control as possible. At any given point the learner can go back to the instructions or to one of the other samples if the learner gets stuck.
  • This activity promotes social interdependence (criteria 1) by steps 1-3 being independent but steps 4-5 rely on the contributions of your team. This collaborative activity contributes to individual learning by giving students the opportunity to apply the information they have learned about latitude and longitude; it promotes project quality using the virtual picture collage (criteria 2). The peer-to-peer dialogue is promoted as each partner builds on the comment thread creating a “virtual picture” of the location they have selected (criteria 3).
  • Role playing games and action/adventure games akin to “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” achieve several of the principles of games in e-Learning Clark and Mayer discuss including: Appropriate for the learning objectives Learning is essential to the progress of the game Inclusion of proven instructional strategies Explanatory feed back is included Self-explanation is required Extremely structured Avoids cognitive overload through over-complexity.

Using maps storyboard part 4 Using maps storyboard part 4 Presentation Transcript

  • Using latitude and longitude e-learning storyboard Elizabeth Ayres AET/541 Professor Melvin Hagan August 26, 2012
  • Content ScreenScreen Title Introduction Screen # 1/18Objective How does using latitude and longitude help us use maps?TaughtOn-Screen How do we read maps? What do you need to know to use a map effectively?TextPop-Up Text -“Hi! I’m Mr. Globey! Today we are going to explore the world of map! Knowing how to use maps will help you learn more about the world!” - Click Mr. Globey to ContinueExtra Read more: http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/imageg.htmInformationGraphics Globey presenting informationSpecsIntegration Vertical Layout; hotspots on labels; click-interactivity; Pop-ups open in visual areaNotesBack to 1 Next to screen #screen # 2Content Screen
  • Hi! I’m Mr. Globey! Today we are going toexplore the world of map! Knowing how to usemaps will help you learn more about the world! Click Mr. Globey to continue
  • Content ScreenScreen Title Introduction Screen # 2/18Objective How does using latitude and longitude help us use maps?TaughtOn-Screen How do we read maps? What do you need to know to use a map effectively?TextPop-Up Text • We use latitude to find where a place is North and South •We use longitude to find where a place is East and West •We Use them together to find the absolute location anywhere on the globe. Absolute means that it will never change!Extra Read more: http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/imageg.htmInformationGraphic Topographic and political map of the worldspecsIntegration Vertical Layout; click-interactivity; Pop-ups open in visual areaNotesBack to 1 Next to screen #screen # 3Content Screen
  • Introductory SlideScreen Title Lesson Introduction Screen # 3/18On-Screen Welcome to the introductory lesson, Using Maps – an introduction to latitude andText longitude Objective: Students will be able to read, use, and evaluate maps more effectively by using latitude and longitude lines.Audience/ Audience:Subject CA Standard 4.1.1 Explain and use the coordinate grid system of latitude and longitude to determine the absolute locations of places in California and on Earth. CA Standard 4.1.2 Distinguish between the North and South Poles; the equator and the prime meridian; the tropics; and the hemispheres, using coordinates to plot locations.Pop-Up Text NoneExtra NoneInformationGraphics Political and topographic world map, Mr. GlobeySpecsIntegration Links to “Using Latitude” – slide #2, “Latitude and the Environment” – slide #4 “UsingNotes Longitude” – slide #6, “Putting it together with examples and practice” – slide #8Back to N/A Next to screenscreen # #4Introductory Slide
  • Title Objective:1. Using Lines of 3. Using Lines of Latitude Longitude2. What Else Does 4. Putting it all Latitude tell us? together Click the links to learn more!
  • Content ScreenScreen Title Latitude Lines Screen # 4/18Objective Taught What Latitude MeasuresOn-Screen Text Lines of latitude are imaginary lines that circle the earth in the East/West plane, and range from 0° to 90°. Click each term on the screen to learn more about using lines of latitudePop-Up Text ° (degree symbol) – Both latitude and Longitude are measured in degrees denoted by this symbol after a number. Parallel – Unlike meridians (longitude), none of the imaginary lines that go around the earth horizontally (east/west) will ever meet or cross one another. “Parallel” is another term used for a line of latitude Northern/Southern Hemisphere – When using latitude, the earth is divided into halves. All of the area on the earth that is above the equator is considered the Northern Hemisphere and will be noted in the measurement with an ‘N’ after the measurement. All of the area on the earth that is below the equator is considered the Southern Hemisphere and will be noted in the measurement with an ‘S’ after the measurement. Equator: The equator is located at 0° and is the starting point we will be using when using lines of latitude North/ South Poles: The north pole and the south pole are the farthest points from the equator and are measured at 90°N and 90°S respectively “Going up or down the ladder” – to help you remember what to do when you see latitude measurements, remember… to use latitude you go up or down the ladder.Extra Information Read more: http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/imageg.htmGraphics Specs Illustration of a map with lines of latitude ONLY with labels Parallel, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, Equator, North Pole, South Pole, “Ladder” (highlights parallels in 10° increments)Integration Notes Vertical Layout; hotspots on labels; click-interactivity; Pop-ups open in visual areaBack to screen # 3 Next to screen # 5Content Screen
  • Scroll over each of these terms to see how to use latitude when looking at a map or globeLatitude Terms:• Parallels•Hemisphere Parallels •Northern Pop-up Hemisphere Text •Southern Hemisphere•Equator•Poles •North Pole •South Pole
  • Question ScreenScreen Title Question 1 Screen # 5/18Objective Tested Using lines of latitudeQuestion Stem 20°S latitude runs through which three continents?Options [A] North America, South America, Asia [B] South America, Africa, Oceana [C] Asia, Africa, Europe [D] Europe, Antarctica, AfricaCorrect Answer B Feedback  Good Job! - If you follow the 20°S parallel line around the whole globe- “Next” arrow does or across the whole map, you will pass over South America, Africa, andnot appear until the Oceanaquestion is answered X – Check the steps - first find the equator (0°) in the middle of the map,and feedback has travel south (down) until you find 20°S latitude. Follow that line acrossappeared. the whole map and you will cross South America, Africa, and Oceana.Graphic Map of the world with capability of zooming in and outBack to screen # 4 Next to screen #3Question Screen
  • Content ScreenScreen Title Latitude Lines Screen # 6/18Objective Taught What does Latitude tell us about a location?On-Screen Text Not only does latitude tell us WHERE a location is, but is also helps us learn about the location. Latitude tells us about the climate and weather of a location as well as explaining the type of animals and plants that can live there. Click each label on the image to learn more about what lines of latitude tell us about the environmentPop-Up Text The locations on the equator are among the hottest in the world. The farther North or South you get away from the equator, the colder it tends to be.Extra Information Plants and animals have to adapt to the environments. That means the farther away from the equator you are, the more you will see animals with heavy fur coats, plants with shallow roots, and other defense mechanisms. The closer to the equator you are you will see more cold blooded animals, plants that can retain water for long periods of time, and other defense mechanisms against heat.Graphics Specs Map of the world with latitude lines only. Pop-up picture links to “animals with heavy fur coats” “plants with shallow roots” “cold blooded animals” “plants that can retain water”Integration Notes Vertical layout, links between animals and plant types and pictures examples of each, highlight equator, click-interactivity, pop-up opens at the top of the pageBack to screen # 3 Next to screen #7
  • Question ScreenScreen Title Question 2 Screen # 7/18Objective Tested What does latitude tell us?Question Stem Which of these plants and animals are likely to live along the same or near the same line of latitude?Options [A] Lynx (w/photograph) [B] Rattlesnake (w/photograph) [C] Pine Trees (w/photograph) [D] Cactus (w/photograph) [E] None of these would live near the same line of latitudeCorrect Answer A and CFeedback  Good Job! - As you can see, a lynx has a heavy fur coat so it could survive pretty well in- “Next” arrow does the fairly cold environment and pine trees would love the amount of rain this region wouldnot appear until the get and could survive the cold winters, while rattlesnakes and cacti thrive in hot and dryquestion is answered areas. What kind of plants and animals live where you do? Do you know where else in theand feedback has world animals like them live?appeared. X – Look again…a lynx has a heavy fur coat so it could survive pretty well in the fairly cold environment and pine trees would love the amount of rain this region would get and could survive the cold winters while rattlesnakes and cacti thrive in hot and dry areas. What kind of plants and animals live where you do? Do you know where else in the world animals like them live?Graphic Specs Lynx, Rattlesnake, Pine Tree, CactusBack to screen # 6 Next to screen #3Question Screen
  • Content ScreenScreen Title Longitude Lines Screen # 8/18Objective Taught What Longitude MeasuresOn-Screen Text Lines of longitude are imaginary lines that circle the earth in the North/South plane, and range from 0° to 180°. Click each label on the image to learn more about using lines of longitudePop-Up Text ° (degree symbol) – Both latitude and Longitude are measured in degrees denoted by this symbol after a number. Meridians – Meridians are the name of the imaginary lines that are drawn vertically (north/south) on the map. Unlike parallels (latitude), meridians DO cross or meet. All of the meridians meet at the North and South Poles. Eastern/Western Hemisphere – When using longitude, the earth is divided into halves. All of the area on the earth that is east of the prime meridian is considered the Eastern Hemisphere and will be noted in the measurement with an ‘E’ after the measurement. All of the area on the earth that is west of the prime meridian is considered the Western Hemisphere and will be noted in the measurement with an ‘S’ after the measurement. Prime Meridian: The primer meridian is an arbitrary line of longitude and is located at 0°. It is the starting point we will be using when using lines of longitude. North/ South Poles: The north pole and the south pole are the points at which all of the meridians meet at the “top” and “bottom” of the earth. “Going along the longitude” – Longitude lines are longer that latitude lines (they go all the way around the earth in every direction, where latitude circles get smaller the farther away you are from the equator) to help you remember what to do when you see longitude measurements, remember… to use longitude go along the longitude.Extra Information Read more: http://www.nationalatlas.gov/articles/mapping/a_latlong.htmlGraphics Specs Illustration of a map with lines of longitude ONLY with labels Meridian, Eastern Hemisphere, Western Hemisphere, Prime Meridian, North Pole, South Pole, “LONG” (highlights meridians in 10° increments)Integration Notes Vertical Layout; hotspots on labels; click-interactivity; Pop-ups open in visual areaBack to screen # 3 Next to screen #9Content Screen
  • Question ScreenScreen Title Question 3 Screen # 9/18Objective Tested Using lines of LongitudeQuestion Stem Which of the following countries does 60°W run through?Options [A] Russia [B] Greenland [C] Brazil [D] Sweden [E] CanadaCorrect Answer B, C, EFeedback  Good Job! - If you follow the 60°W Meridian from the North Pole to the South Pole, you will pass over a number of countries, but among them are Greenland, Brazil, and Canada. The other countries listed are in the Eastern Hemisphere. X – Uh-oh… did you go east instead of west from the prime meridian? If you follow the 60°W Meridian from the North Pole to the South Pole, you will pass over a number of countries, but among them are Greenland, Brazil, and Canada. The other countries listed are in the Eastern Hemisphere.Graphics Specs Political Map of the world with Longitude linesBack to screen # 8 Next to screen #3Question Screen
  • Content ScreenScreen Title How to use this information Screen # 10/18Objective Taught Using latitude and longitude to find cities as well as the environment and geographic features. Click each label on the image to learn more about using lines of longitudeOn-Screen Text Full Example – Find a major city and geographic feature located near 35°N latitude and 120°W LongitudePop-Up Text Step 1 – On the World Map Identify the equator (0° latitude) Step 2 – Go “north” (up the ladder) on the map 35°(up the latitude ladder) Step 3 – Find the prime meridian (0° longitude) Step 4 – Go “west” on the map 120° (a LONG the Longitude) Step 5 – Zoom in on the map where these two lines intersect Step 6 – If you look around this point you will see the cities of Santa Maria, CA, Bakersfield, CA, and San Louis Obispo, CA in the United States. The point lies in the Los Padres National Forest. It is probably a temperate climate because it is not close and not too far from the equator.Extra Information Other factors, like how close the city is to the water will also affect the climate, animals, and plant life in the area http://education.gm.com/9-12/technology/mapping-the-globe-with-latitude-and-longitudeGraphics Specs Interactive political and topographic map of the world, compass roseIntegration Notes Steps pop-up sequentially on click and highlight element on the map Map must be able to zoom from world down to citiesBack to screen # 3 Next to screen #11Content Screen
  • Question ScreenScreen Title How to Use This Information – Question 4 Screen # 11/18Objective Finding cities, countries, and natural features using lines of latitude and longitudeTaught/TestedQuestion Stem Find a major city located near 18° N and 50° E, the country the point lies in, and at least one natural geographic feature in the area.Pop-Up Text – Step 1 – On the World Map Identify the equator (0° latitude)faded worked Step 2 – Go “north” (up the ladder) on the map 18° (up the latitude ladder)example #1 Step 3 – Find the prime meridian (0° longitude) Step 4 – Go “east” on the map 50° (a LONG the Longitude) Step 5 – Zoom in on the map where these two lines intersect Step 6 – What cities and geographic features are near this point on the map? City: Country: Geographic Feature:Possible Answer (answer may vary) Cities: Mukalla City, As-Sahir, Ghayl Ba Wazir Country: India – correct (answer may vary) Natural Geographic features: Arabian Sea and the Gulf of AdenGraphics Specs Interactive political and topographic map of the worldIntegration Steps pop-up sequentially on click and highlight element on the mapNotes Map must be able to zoom from world down to cities, answer boxes for city, country, and geographic feature. “mr. globey” help button – prompts clues. Submit to reveal feedbackFeedback  Correct! Mukalla City, As-Sahir, and Ghayl Ba Wazir in India are all near 18° N and 50° E. The point is near the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Aden. Are you sure? Mukalla City, As-Sahir, and Ghayl Ba Wazir in India are all near 18° N and 50° E. The point is near the Arabian Sea and the Gulf of Aden. If you found a different answers double check your workBack to screen # 10 Next to screen #12
  • Question ScreenScreen Title How to use this information – Question 5 Screen # 12/18Objective Taught Finding cities, countries, and natural features using lines of latitude and longitudeQuestion Stem Find a major city located near 20° S and 70° W, the country the point lies in, and at least one natural geographic feature in the area.Pop-Up Text – faded worked Step 1 – On the World Map Identify the equator 0°latitudeexample #2 Step 2 – Go “south” (down the ladder) on the map 20°N (down the latitude ladder) Step 3 and 4 – Find the longitude Step 5 – Zoom in on the map where these two lines intersect Step 6 – What is one city near this point on the map? City: Country: Geographic featurePossible Answers (answer may vary) City: Alto Hospicio Country: Chile (answer may vary) Natural Geographic Feature: Pacific OceanGraphics Specs Interactive political and topographic map of the worldIntegration Notes Steps pop-up sequentially on click and highlight element on the map Map must be able to zoom from world down to cities, answer boxes for city, country, and geographic feature. “mr. globey” help button – prompts clues. Submit to reveal feedbackFeedback  Good Job! - Alto Hospicio is the city closest to 20° S and 70° W. It is in Chile and right on the Pacific Ocean Are you sure? Alto Hospicio is the city closest to 20° S and 70° W. It is in Chile and right on the Pacific Ocean. . If you found a different answers double check your workBack to screen # 10 Next to screen #13Question Screen
  • Question ScreenScreen Title How to use this information – Question 6 Screen # 13/18Objective Taught Finding cities, countries, and natural features using lines of latitude and longitudeQuestion Stem Find a major city located near 35° S and 180° E, the country the point lies in, and at least one natural geographic feature in the area.Pop-Up Text – faded Step 1 and 2 – Find the Latitudeworked example #3 Step 3 and 4 – Find the longitude Step 5 – Zoom in on the map where these two lines intersect Step 6 – What is geographic feature does this point lie in? What country? A City: Country: Geographic feature:Possible Answers (answer may vary) City: Bungonia, Tolwong, Quiera Country: Australia (answer may vary) Natural Geographic Feature: Bungonia Recreational Area or Morton National ParkGraphics Specs Interactive political and topographic map of the worldIntegration Notes Steps pop-up sequentially on click and highlight element on the map Map must be able to zoom from world down to cities, answer boxes for city, country, and geographic feature. “mr. globey” help button – prompts clues. Submit to reveal feedbackFeedback  Good Job! - Bungonia, Tolwong, Quiera are all cities in Australia near 35° S and 180° E and near Bungonia Recreational Area and Morton National Park Are you sure? - Bungonia, Tolwong, Quiera are all cities in Australia near 35° S and 180° E and near Bungonia Recreational Area and Morton National Park. If you found a different answers double check your workBack to screen # 10 Next to screen #14
  • Question ScreenScreen Title How to use this information – Question 7 Screen # 14/18Objective Taught Finding cities, countries, and natural features using lines of latitude and longitudeQuestion Stem Find a major city located near 60°N and 25° E, the country the point lies in or near, and at least one natural geographic feature near this point.Pop-Up Text – faded What cities, geographic feature(s), and country are near the point 60°N 25°E?worked example #4 City: Country: Geographic feature:Possible Answers (answer may vary) City: Helsinki Country: Finland (answer may vary) Natural Geographic Feature: Gulf of FinlandGraphics Specs Interactive political and topographic map of the worldIntegration Notes Map must be able to zoom from world down to cities, answer boxes for city, country, and geographic feature. “mr. globey” help button – prompts clues. Submit button to reveal feedbackFeedback  Good Job! - Helsinki, Finland is near the Gulf of Finland. It is the city closest to 60°N and 25° E. Are you sure? Helsinki, Finland is near the Gulf of Finland. It is the city closest to 60°N and 25° E. If you found a different answers double check your workBack to screen # 10 Next to screen # 15Question Screen
  • Summary SlideScreen Title What Have We Learned? Screen # 15/18Screen ImageExtra Information n/aAudioIntegration Notes Play song automatically, pause/play button, stop buttonBack to screen # n/a Next to screen # 14Summary Slide
  • Question ScreenScreen Title Collaborative Activity Screen # 16/18Objective Taught What knowing the longitude and latitude of a location tells us.Activity instructions – Activity instructions – to be completed on a discussion board or blog to be completed 1. Using http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/latitude_and_longitude_finder.htm find the on a discussion latitude and longitude of your city. Round to the nearest degree. board or blog 2. Post the latitude and longitude on your blog/discussion board, but NOT the actual city, state, country, etc…. 3. Look at your teammate’s posts. In the comment section of their post, using the information they have given you about where they live make an educated guess about: A. What the climate is like there (ex. are the summers mild? Are the winters cold and snowy?) B. What kind of animals are native there (make at least one specific guess) C. What kind of plants are native there (make at least one specific guess) D. What would you pack if you were going to visit this location. 4. After your teammates have made their guesses about where you live, reveal the location and analyze their responses. Did they guess correctly? Take this opportunity to tell them about the climate, animals, and plant life where you live. Think about what season it is and what clothing you wear daily to be comfortable. What clues would knowing the latitude and longitude have given them that might have helped (if they were wrong) 5. As a group, choose one location and create a “virtual picture” collage of the location based on your discussion of what is native to that latitude and longitude (each member must contribute at least two pictures).Back to screen # 10 Next to screen # 17Question Screen
  • Game IntegrationScreen Title Game/Simulation integration Screen # 17/18This game would http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dL-13NZAXuEneed to be updatedbefore it could beused by a modernuser but the basicstructure and themewould be effective.Integration Notes The game to be integrated would be an updated version of “Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?” with the use of latitude and longitude as the key “clues” for the user.Back to screen # n/a n/aGame Integration
  • Summary SlideScreen Title Lesson Summary Screen # 18/18On-Screen Text You have reached the end of the lesson, Using Maps – an introduction to latitude and longitude. In this lesson, you learned What latitude and longitude lines are How to use latitude and longitude lines to find places on a map What you can learn about a location based on its latitudePop-Up Text NoneExtra Information NoneGraphics Specs Political and topographic world mapIntegration Notes No interactivityBack to screen # 16 – text: need review? Click on Mr Globey! Next to screen # 1Summary Slide