Nchcmm presentation 10 variables_the reason_g_cole_8-2011

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Building a Better Message: The 10 Variables That Really Matter (The Reason)
Galen Cole, PhD, MPH, LPC
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Dr. Cole provides the background and purpose of the Message Development Tool (MDT) and describes the
results of the expert panel meeting that assisted in the tool’s design. CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention
and Control created the Web-based MDT to enable health communicators to systematically and scientifically
develop and validate effective health messages. Message mapping is a proven communication tool to deliver
complex information in an easy-to-understand format for emergency and risk communication situations;
however, such a tool does not currently exist for chronic disease messages.

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  • Need to remember that “Message Development Tool” will not be the name… in fact, after the User Testing we realize it’s a poor name. THE TEN VARIABLES ARE:   1.       Age 2.       Gender 3.       Race 4.       Regulatory Focus 5.       Health Goal 6.       Gain/Loss Framing 7.       Physical vs. Social Consequences 8.       Emotion 9.       Referencing 10.   Vividness    
  • Communication is central to effective cancer control across all phases of the carcinogenesis process, from primary prevention to survivorship With this in mind, THE DCPC we have placed a great emphasis on improving both our short and long lead communication interventions and science
  • Tools that I have helped developed to address some of these problems include CDCynergy and the CDCynergy Message Mapping Guide My experience with these e-tools has left me with a strong bias toward using
  • Decision support tools lend themselves to addressing these problems. That is, they are:
  • (EI: refer to the tool name as temporary for now.) Theoretical Background and research questions/hypothesis: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) has created a tool to enable health communicators to systematically and scientifically formulate and validate effective health messages.
  • DCPC has several DSS tools under development: MessageWorks (the focus of our presentation), SocialWorks (A social media strategy tool – released Feb 2012), WhatWorks (a DSS for evaluating communication activities and campaigns – released December 2012), CDCynergy Message Mapping (completed and in distribution), and MessageFocusing (under developmentment).
  • Methods and Results (informing the conceptual analysis): The web-based Message Development Tool (MDT) was created using an innovative and collaborative design process which included review of the literature, identification of an empirical model on which to base the tool, validation and design input from an expert panel, and prototype design and user testing.
  • Methods and Results (informing the conceptual analysis): To create the MDT, CDC DCPC and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted a literature review that resulted in identifying an empirical model for assessing message effectiveness based on key message variables. The model developed by Keller and Lehmann (2008) provides 10 variables that are significant predictors for stated intentions and behavior. The model has been validated through its application to the CDC Verb campaign (2004-2006).
  • Conclusions: CDC DCPC and ORISE used an evidence-based and expert-recommended guided approach to create the Message Development Tool. A prototype is being created based on the identified model, expert input, and concept testing results. The experts will continue to be involved in prototype testing and tool dissemination by serving as mentors for new users. The model on which the tool is based and a demonstration of the MDT will be presented during this Panel discussion.
  • Methods and Results (informing the conceptual analysis)(continued): Expert panels have shown to be an effective means of translating research into practice and of improving programmatic operations and outcomes in the fields of medicine and public health. Following identification of an empirical model, CDC DCPC and ORISE convened a panel of health communications experts to validate use of the algorithm, inform tool content, usability, dissemination and management, and gain early buy-in from partners in the field of health communication. The fifteen panelists represented private, academic, and governmental sectors and had extensive experience with message development, health and social marketing, and health communications campaigns. A facilitator lead the group through a series of questions aimed at creating or refining elements of the MDT. Data from the panelists was collected electronically using Group System's ThinkTank® Software, a format that made it possible for each participant to answer each question and react to others input in real time. Panelists prioritized responses to ensure that the MDT incorporated elements considered most critical by experts.
  • Methods and Results (informing the conceptual analysis)(continued):
  • Implications for research and/or practice: Health communication best practice stresses the importance of basing message development on formative research. The literature has identified essential variables of a health message. However, in real-world practice, where time is limited and approval channels can run deep, research and constructs are often lost. It is anticipated that the MDT will assist federal, state and local health communicators to create and defend better messages by using key variables tailored to their health problem and target audience. The experts will continue to be involved in prototype testing and tool dissemination by serving as mentors for new users. CDC hopes that the MDT will also contribute to research on effective message development. MDT administrators will carefully monitor the community forum for required updates to the Keller and Lehmann model and to the MDT algorithm. 
  • This slide is to illustrate why we are making the tools adaptable r
  • Nchcmm presentation 10 variables_the reason_g_cole_8-2011

    1. 1. Galen Cole, PhD, DAPA, MPH, LPC <ul><li>Associate Director of Communication Science </li></ul><ul><li>CDC Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC) </li></ul><ul><li>National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing, and Media </li></ul><ul><li>August 9-11, 2011 </li></ul>Building a Better Message: The 10 Variables That Really Matter The Reason <ul><li>Division of Cancer Prevention and Control </li></ul><ul><li>National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion </li></ul>
    2. 2. BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Objectives: • Recognize the10 variables that are significant predictors for stated intentions and behavior • Understand how these 10 variables can be applied to develop and defend more effective messages • Describe the objectives, design process, and features of the CDC DCPC “Message Development Tool”
    3. 3. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Communication Across the Cancer Control Continuum
    4. 4. BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>The Problems: </li></ul><ul><li>Smart people communicate as if it were an easy thing to do </li></ul><ul><li>We have used message mapping extensively. It’s good tool for preparing and delivering complex information in an easy to understand format. However, it’s designed for emergency and risk communication situations. </li></ul><ul><li>CDC has not adopted a tool/process for systematically developing and testing chronic disease messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Health Communicators need additional support in developing and defending systematically derived and tested chronic disease messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Communicators encounter numerous barriers to “real-time” testing of segment-focused messages. </li></ul>
    5. 5. BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control CDC Message Communication Tools Message Mapping Tool (Vince Covello model)) CDCynergy (CDC, 1999-2008)
    6. 6. BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>Web-based and model-based decision support systems (DSS) have been shown to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational decision making. </li></ul><ul><li>low cost </li></ul><ul><li>require little user training </li></ul><ul><li>increase productivity </li></ul><ul><li>speed the decision making process without regard to geographic limitations </li></ul><ul><li>facilitate the collection of multiple perspectives on decision problems </li></ul><ul><li>support collaboration by building virtual team structures </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage a more standardized, evidence based approach </li></ul><ul><li>Easier to evaluate </li></ul>
    7. 7. BACKGROUND METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control CDC DCPC’s Concept “Message Development Tool (MDT) “ A web-based tool that enables health communicators to systematically and scientifically formulate, validate and defend effective health messages. MessageWorks
    8. 8. Interactive Message Development Describe Problem Analyze Problem Plan Evaluation Implement Plan Operationalize Lessons Learned Plan Intervention Develop Intervention Steps 4.2 & 4.3 Message Focusing Message Content Strategy Message Strategy Tool Message Mapping <ul><li>Target: </li></ul><ul><li>Improving the predicted impact on intended behavior for all message types. </li></ul><ul><li>Target: </li></ul><ul><li>Messages used in situations that have spoken or presentation-based components, especially interactive discussions/Q&A </li></ul><ul><li>Target: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-only responses to specific questions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supplement Message Focusing/Strategy Tool </li></ul></ul>Message Delivery Strategy Intended Effects : Reduces barriers to uptake by addressing message architecture issues. Intended Effects : Increases audience’s receptivity of messages through engagement strategies. Intended Effects : Increases an audience’s capacity to access & use communication research. SHORT LEAD LONG LEAD Connection to your audience Focus on Communication Campaigns SocialWorks WhatWorks
    9. 9. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>The concept for the tool was created using an innovative and collaborative design process : </li></ul><ul><li>review of the literature and interviewed key informants, </li></ul><ul><li>identification of an empirical model on which to base the tool, </li></ul><ul><li>Received validation and design input from an expert panel, and </li></ul><ul><li>Conducted wireframe prototype design and user testing. </li></ul>
    10. 10. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>The empirical model for assessing message effectiveness based on key message variables. </li></ul><ul><li>The Keller and Lehmann (2008) model provides 10 variables that are significant predictors for stated intentions and behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>The model has been validated through its application to the CDC Verb campaign (2004-2006). </li></ul>
    11. 11. Division of Cancer Prevention and Control CDC DCPC and ORISE used an evidence-based and expert-recommended guided approach to create the Message Development Tool. The experts will continue to be involved in prototype testing and tool dissemination by serving as mentors for new users. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
    12. 12. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>A panel of fifteen health communications experts was convened in March 2011 to : </li></ul><ul><li>validate use of the algorithm </li></ul><ul><li>Helped us create, refine and prioritize tool content and features, </li></ul><ul><li>inform tool usability, dissemination and management, </li></ul><ul><li>gain early buy-in from partners in the field of health communication. </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration software allowed panelists to answer each question and react to others input in real time. </li></ul>
    13. 13. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
    14. 14. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE
    15. 15. METHODS AND RESULTS BACKGROUND CONCLUSIONS IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>User testing in June 2011 refined the MDT wireframe prototype and further explored findings of the expert panel. User testing goals were to:  </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm general concept for the Message Development Tool's process flow. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Understand user preferences for the main actions and features within the Message Development Tool. </li></ul><ul><li>Gather preliminary ideas on nomenclature for the Tool and some of its components. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Collect preliminary information on access and preferred channels for dissemination. </li></ul>
    16. 16. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS BACKGROUND Division of Cancer Prevention and Control <ul><li>The new tool will help health communicators create and defend better messages by: </li></ul><ul><li>using key variables </li></ul><ul><li>tailoring messages to their health problem and target audience </li></ul><ul><li>providing talking-points on the evidence and science behind the use of key variables </li></ul><ul><li>The new tool will also contribute to research on effective message development. User feedback will be collected to identify required updates to the Keller and Lehmann model .  </li></ul>
    17. 17. LESSON LEARNED The new tool will have a adaptable because THIS… IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS BACKGROUND
    18. 18. Turned into this. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE METHODS AND RESULTS CONCLUSIONS BACKGROUND
    19. 19. <ul><li>Division of Cancer Prevention and Control </li></ul><ul><li>National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion </li></ul>The Future is Not A Gift, It’s an Achievement. Robert Kennedy

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