Poster kats

416 views

Published on

1 Comment
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
416
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
23
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
1
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Poster kats

  1. 1. Vocational Practice and Vocational Education bridging the gap Erik Kats, Jaap van Lakerveld, Hemmo Smit PLATO, Leiden University, the Netherlands <ul><li>Expertise Centres </li></ul><ul><li>In modern society vocational practice and vocational education tend to grow apart. In the Netherlands Expertise Centres for Vocational Education and Business have developed, that restore relationships between the two. </li></ul><ul><li>We studied the changing role of these Expertise Centres, that originate from cooperation of the social partners. Nowadays they intervene in different ways in the relationships concerned (see the next poster): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They try to improve professional relations , for instance through the promotion of circles of teachers and supervisors. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They support companies and organizations in improving themselves as a learning environment ( ‘upward’ ). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They translate qualification needs to vocational education ( ‘downward’ ). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They contribute to regional economic progress by promoting the quality of employment and education ( structural conditions ). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Educational Advisor </li></ul><ul><li>a new role </li></ul><ul><li>In the past the task of the Expertise Centres was the provision of vocational training. This task was carried out by trainers who mostly had their background in vocational practice itself. </li></ul><ul><li>The new role of the Expertise Centres is accomplished by ‘educational advisors’ who mostly have their background in higher education. They are to be considered typical examples of modern ‘learning experts’ or ‘HRD experts’. In the qualifications and competences of these experts knowledge of the labour market, organizational and political sensitivity, advisory and consultancy competences, networking, acquisition and seeking opportunities are more prominent than traditional teacher and trainer qualifications. </li></ul><ul><li>In a knowledge economy many jobs carry ever broader responsibilities, require an ever deeper insight and ask for an ever higher level of competence. For that kind of jobs traditional training and instruction grow obsolete and are replaced by the creation of fruitful learning environments. The new role of the educational advisors expresses this social change. </li></ul>PLATO is the Centre for Research and Development in Education and Lifelong Learning of Leiden University, the Netherlands (www.plato.leidenuniv.nl) More information about our study: kats@plato.leidenuniv.nl

×