P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                               AUG...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                 A...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                 A...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                              AUGU...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
P R T E S O L - G R A M!                                                                                                  ...
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011
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PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011

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PRTESOLGRAM Aug 2011

  1. 1. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 PRTESOL-GRAM A publication of the Puerto Rico Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages 38th PRTESOL Annual Convention and Exhibit Plenary Speakers Jackie,  Values,  and  Baseball Sharon   Robinson  is  the  author  of   many  works   of   fic3on   and  nonfic3on.  She   has   wri7en   several   widely   praised   books   about   her   father,   baseball   legend   Jackie  Robinson,   including   Jackie’s   Nine:   Jackie   Robinson’s   Values   to  Live   By,   Promises  to  Keep:  How  Jackie  Robinson  Changed  America,  and  her  new  picture   book,   TesFng   the   Ice,   illustrated   by   Kadir   Nelson.   In   addi3on   to   her   wri3ng   career,  Ms.  Robinson  is  an   educa3onal  consultant   for  Major  League  Baseball.   In   this   capacity,   she   oversees   school   and   community-­‐based   educa3onal   Sharon  Robinson programs.    Ms.  Robinson  is  Vice  Chairman  of  the  Jackie   Robinson  Founda3on   and   serves  on   the   boards   for  the   Roberto   Clemente   Sports  City   Complex   in   Carolina,  Puerto  Rico. Integra9on  of  Ethics  and  Values  in  the  Curriculum Dr.   Paul   Begley   is   a   professor   of   educa3onal   leadership   at   Nipissing   University   in  Canada  and  execu3ve   director  of  UCEA  Center  for  the  Study  of   Leadership  and  Ethics.    He  was  a  full  professor  at  Penn  State  un3l  2009.    He   was  a  school   teacher  and  school   principal  before  working   at  the  university   level.    He  was  awarded  the  Master  Professor  Award  by   the  University  Council   for  Educa3onal  Administra3on.  The  UCEA  Master  Professor   Award  is  given  to   an  individual  faculty  member  whose  record  is  so  dis3nguished  that  the  UCEA   must  recognize  this  individual  in   a  significant   and  3mely  manner.  In   addi3on,   Dr.   Begley’s   teaching   and   research   interests   focus  on   all   aspects  of   school   leadership,  including   the  influence  of  values  and  ethics  on  school  leadership   Paul  Begley prac3ces. Neuroscience  Applica9ons  to  Teaching  English:   How  Teachers  Build  Brain  Capaci9es  That  Reduce  Bullying  and  Drop-­‐ out  Rates Dr.  Martha   S.  Burns  is  an  Associate  Adjunct  Professor   at  Northwestern   University  and  serves  as  a  Senior  Clinical  Specialist  for  Scien3fic  Learning   Corpora3on.  She  was  a  prac3cing  Speech-­‐Language  Pathologist  for  over   thirty  years.  Dr.  Burns  has  published  numerous  journal  ar3cles  and  three   books  on  the  neurological  basis  of   speech  and  language.  Dr.  Burns  is  an   engaging,   dynamic   and   well   organized   presenter   who   offers   cuZng-­‐ edge   informa3on   that   is   essen3al   to   today’s   prac33oner.   Her   special   talent   is   her   ability   to   take   complex   informa3on   and   present   it   in   a   Martha  S.  Burns clinically  meaningful  and  prac3cal  way.  ! PAGE 1
  2. 2. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 The   mo7o   of   the   Boy   scouts   is   “Be   Prepared”.   As   the   month   of   Ed rn August  approaches,  you  and  I   need  to   ito er be  prepared  to  receive  our   new  students   Co for   the   upcoming   school   year.   There   are   r ’s PRTESOL-­‐Gram some  important   items   that   should   be  in   your     Table  of  Contents   first  aid  kit.   Use  this  checklist  to    Editor’s  Corner:  A  First  Aid  Kit  for   make   sure   you’re   ready   to   start   Teachers.......................................2 school.   The  key   items   you’ll  need  to   Dr.  Josué  Alejandro,                                                             be  ready   are   a  toothpick,   rubberband,   2011  PRTESOL  President..............  3   eraser,   gum,   chocolate   kiss,   bandaid,   pencil,   and  a  tea  bag.  You  may   ask,   “Why?”    Cheap  (and  free!)  Technology  That   Let  me  explain. Makes  Oral  Produc9on  Fun               by  Andrea  Dabbs..........................5     Toothpick:  This  will  remind  you  to  dig  deep  to  find    Time  to  Turn  the  Table                                             the  hidden  talents  others  have.     by  John  Corcoran..........................8    Tes9ng  the  Ice:    A  family  Legacy         Rubber  bands:  To  remind  you  to  be  flexible  because   by  Sharon  Robinson......................8   people  and  things  aren’t  always  the  way  you  want    TEACHING  TIPS:  Random  words                 them  to  be.   Prof.  Carmelo  Arbona,  Editor.......  9   Band  aid:  To  help  you  cure  those    Conference  Calendar...................9   hurt  feelings,  yours  or  of  others.    Focusing  on  the  Academic  Needs   of  La9no  Students                                                                     by  Manuel  Hernandez  Carmona..10   Pencil:  To  jot  down  every  day  all  the  blessings  you   receive.    Reducing  Avoidable  Errors           by  Hazel  Davidson........................12     Eraser:  To    remember  that  we  all  make  mistakes    To  Publish  Or  Not  To  Publish:  An   and  nothing  happens.   Ethical  Dilemma  For  Ac9on   Research  Teachers                                                         by  Petra  E.  Avillan-­‐Leon..............14   Bubble  gum:  To  remind  you  to  s3ck  to  every  thing   that  takes  effort.  Persevere.   Coping  with  Coinages:  New  arrivals       in  the  English  Language             by  Dr.  Alicia  Pousada...................16 A  chocolate  Kiss:  This  reminds  you  that    Phone9c  Reading,  Or  Sight   everyone  needs  a  kiss  and  a  hug  daily.   Reading? by  Vivian  Mayol  Kauffmann.........20 Finally,  the  tea  bag:  What   for?    To  take  some  3me…  to    Using  Emergent  Classroom   relax  and  make  a  list  of  all  the  nice  things  you   Situa2ons  as  Strategic  Learning   have.   Opportuni2es  while  Engaging   Students  in  Meaningful  Research   Remember:  to  the  world  you  maybe  only   Milagros  Marinez  ScheZni,  Ed.D.  &   somebody,     Richard  Román  Spicer,  Ed.D.........22 but  to  somebody  you  may  be  the  world.    ! PAGE 2
  3. 3. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 PRTESOL  President’s  Message This   coming   semester   we   will   have   three   more   chapter   conferences,   in   August,   Northern   Chapter,   in   September,   Eastern   Chapter   and   Southern   Chapter   in   October.   Then   our   most       We   are  glad   that   we   can   provide   you   with   important   event   will   be   our   38th   Annual   the   second   issue  of   the   PRTESOLGRAM   before   the   Conven9on   on   November   18-­‐19   at   the   beau9ful   beginning   of   the   new   semester.  Hopefully,  you  will   and   spacious   Puerto   Rico   Conven9on   Center.   The   have   more   3me   to   read   this   issue.   It   has   many   expecta3ons  for   our  Conven3on  are  great.    We  have   interes3ng  ar3cles  about  ethics,  ac3on  research,  the   three   outstanding   plenary   speakers;   Sharon   most  recent  developments  in  the   English   language,     Robinson   (daughter   of   Jackie   Robinson)   educator   educa3onal  technology,  among  others. and  author,   Dr.  Paul   Begley,    from  Canada,   Director   The  PRTESOL   Board  has   been  working  hard   of   the   Interna3onal   Center   for   the   Study   of   these   past   six   months   organizing   professional   Leadership   and   Ethics,   and   Dr.   Martha   Burns   an   development   ac3vi3es   for   our   membership.     The   expert  in  the  field  of  neuroscience  and  learning.    We   first   ac3vity   was   the   Southern   Chapter   Spring   will   also   have   60   concurrent   sessions   offered   by   Ins3tute   in   April;   a   great   success   in   terms   of   presenters  from  Puerto  Rico,  the  United   States,  the   organiza3on,   quality   of   workshops   and   recrui3ng   Virgin   islands   and   the  Dominican   Republic.     Many   new   members.   Then   we  had  the   Western  Chapter   exhibitors   with   the   most   up   to   date   educa3onal   conference  at  the  end  April  and  the  Metro  Chapter   materials  will  be  there.   We   invite  you  to  stay  at  the   conference   in   May,   both   events   were   also   very   new   Sheraton   Hotel   and   Casino   next   to   the   successful.   Our   last   ac3vity   of   this   period   was   the   Conven3on   Center.   Our   conference   par3cipants   Summer  Ins9tute   which  focused  on  technology  and   have   been   given   the   excep3onally   special   rate   of   was  held   at  UPR   Aguadilla.     This   ac3vity   gave   the   $139  plus  taxes  per  night  per  room.   par3cipants  the   opportunity   to   have   five   hours   of   Please   join   us   for   this   extraordinary   intensive  training  in  the  effec3ve   use   of  technology   professional   development   event   for   English   tools   for   their   teaching.     I   a7ended   the   higher   educators,   the   38th   Annual   PRTESOL   Conven9on   educa3on  workshop  offered  by   Dr.  Leonardo  Flores   on  November  18-­‐19.    Preregister  so   you  can   get  the   which  was  indeed  excep3onal  and  engaging.     best  rates   and    have  the  opportunity  to  par9cipate   One   of   my   goals  for   this   year   has   been   to   in  a   raffle  for   a   free  night  at  the    Sheraton  Hotel.   make   PRTESOL   more   visible   and   known   by   all   See   the   conven3on   centerfold   for   all   the   English  educators,  poli3cians,  and  society  in  general.   informa3on   and   forms   and   visit   our   website   for   We   have   been   distribu3ng   PRTESOL   promo3onal   more  details.  www.puertoricotesol.org material  which  has  helped  us  make   new  contacts  in   May  God  bless  you. different  places  and   ins3tu3ons.     At  the  beginning   of  this  month  we  went  to   the  legislature  where  we     Dr.  Josué  Alejandro, distributed   the   PRTESOL   brochure   and   conven3on   poster   and   spoke   to   several   key   people.     We  s3ll   2011  PRTESOL  President have  a  lot  of  work  to  do  in  order  to  make  PRTESOL  a   more  visible  and  respected  organiza3on  .  Please  join   us  in  this  effort.! PAGE 3
  4. 4. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 TESOLGRAM is a periodical service to English language educators and administrators published by Puerto Rico TESOL, P. O. Box 366828, San Juan, PR 00936 -6828. Newsletter Staff Editor: Carmelo Arbona Circulation: 1,000. Articles on English- language teaching, theory, and education in general are welcomed. Submissions must be in MSWord format, double-spaced, no longer than five pages, and should follow APA or TESOL Quarterly style. All entries are subject to editing for style, space, and other professional considerations. Copyright Notice Articles may be reproduced for classroom use. Quotations up to twenty-five (25) words are permitted if credit to the author and the TESOLGRAM are included. In other situations, written permission is required. Dr. Josué Alejandro, President PRTESOL  2011  Summer  Ins3tute,  UPR  Aguadilla Electrify  your  Teaching:  Technology  in  the  Classroom alejandroprtesol@gmail.com Carmelo Arbona, Editor   The  Ins3tute  was  a  great  success!!!  Forty-­‐two  PRTESOL  members  aIended  this   tesolgrameditor@gmail.com excellent  professional  experience  of  hands-­‐on  technology  workshops.! PAGE 4
  5. 5. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 Cheap  (and  free!)    Technology   between   the   real   world   and   the   That  Makes  Oral  ProducAon  Fun classroom. Andrea  Dabbs PowerPoint  NarraAon. ESL  Instructor/Trainer   Using  a  headset  with   a  microphone   www.writewiseconsul3ng.com built-­‐in   (approximately   $15.00),   you   can   create  listening  and   speaking  assessments     Looking   for   ways   to   increase   for   your  class.  Pair  it   up  with   Jing,  a   screen   authen3c   speaking   opportuni3es   for   your   capture  soSware  from  Techsmith.com students?     With   a   video   camera,   free   (hIp://www.techsmith.com/download/ soSware,  and  a  set  of   headphones   with  a   jing),   and  you   have  the   capacity   to   record   microphone,   you   can   set   up   a   classroom   non-­‐readers  because  the   students  are   able   rich   in   authen3c   oral   assessment   that   is   to  listen  and  repeat. fun  and  easy  to  manage.    When  anxiety  is   The   set-­‐up   is   fairly   simple.     Create   a   low   and   excitement   is   high,   your   ESL   PowerPoint   slide   show   with   words,   assessments  won’t  feel  like  assessments   at   sentences   or   reading   passages.     You   can   all.   design  it  to  your  liking.    ASer  it  is  created,     With   a  small  amount  of  prepara3on   using   the   microphone,   record   whatever   you  can, oral  components   you  wish.    Dummies.com   • Lower  students’  affec3ve  filter, has   a  great  online  video   that  explains   the   • Use   dynamic,   not   sta3c,   tools   to   h o w -­‐ t o   a t   h I p : / / y o u t u . b e / create  forma3ve  assessments QZp3jumnWUg.   • Provide   a   real,   authen)c   audience   for  students   How  to   use  this  in   classroom?     The   • Collect   data   for   oral   produc3on   possibili3es  are  endless.     skills   Students   can   listen   and   read   aloud   with   the   text  or  simply   listen   and   repeat.       Why  these  two  tools?    Not  only   are   For   reading   prac3ce,   students   can   record   they  cheap,  but  they  are  also  immediately   themselves   reading   what   the   instructor   important   to   students   of   all   ages.   has   wriIen   on   the   slides.     They   simply     PowerPoint  is  the  industry  standard  in  the   save   the   narra3on   and   the  instructor   can   business  world.   Medical,  business   and  law   listen  back  to  it  later.  As  students  advance,   offices   world-­‐wide   use   MicrosoS   Office   they   can   create   their   own   sentences   or   products.     Addi3onally,   many   students-­‐-­‐ stories   and  record  their   own  narra3ons   as   especially  adults-­‐-­‐   are  using  video  cameras   well. with   their   families.     It   is   a   perfect   meld  ! PAGE 5
  6. 6. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011   Listening,   speaking   and   recording   teachers   can  use   a  variety   of  techniques   themselves   takes   the   pressure   off   of   to   encourage   students   to   speak   in   students   to   perform   in   a   more   anxiety-­‐ English.   Digital   cameras   come   with   a   filled  seeng,  such  as  in   front  of  the   class.     video   op3on   for   short   clips   and   digital   For   some   students,   even   having   the   video   cameras   can   be   purchased   for   as   instructor   in   the   background   can   be   liIle  as  $60.00. cause   for  concern.    Headphones   provide     Monitoring   oral  produc3on  for  ESL   a  sense  of  privacy  for  many  students  and,   students   can   be   tricky.    When   students’   thus,  reduce  any  extra  stress. perform   speeches,   public   speaking   anxiety   can   nega3vely   influence   their     Students   who   need   oral   prac3ce   English   produc3on.  There   is   less   anxiety   but   cannot   read   can   s3ll   use   the   tool.     when   performing   in   front   of   a   video   The   instructor   records   the  narra3on   and   camera,   as   opposed   to   these   more   the  student  listen  and   repeats.    Need   to   tradi3onal   “speeches”   in   class.     For   ESL   grade   it?     Pair   this   up   with   screen   students,   you   are   more   likely   to   get   an   capture   soSware   to   listen   to   their   authen3c   assessment   of   their   fluency   responses.   Several   students   can   do   this   and  grammar  skills.   in  a  40-­‐minute  class  period.     An   easy   way   to   get   started     with   ESL   students   of   any   level   is   to   film     Do   you   want   pronuncia3on   students   reading   their   wri3ng   or   prac3ce?     Add   a   web   camera   to   the   answering   a   ques3on.   These   projects   computer,   and   students   can   prac3ce   require   virtually   no   edi3ng,   and   cheap   ar3cula3on   points   on   their   own.     No   and   easy   soSware   such   as   Windows   “remembering  what   was   said”   needs   to   Movie   Maker   make   it   into   a   movie   in   happen—it   is   right   there   on   the   minutes.     computer  to   listen   back   to.     Also,  it  can     Beginning   and   Intermediate   ESL   be   graded   outside   of   class,  freeing  class   students   can   begin   videos   with   learning   3me  for  instruc3on.  Saving  students   oral   and   reci3ng   nursery   rhymes.     This   produc3on   provides   a   quick   and   easy   provides   prac3ce   with   rhyming   words,   digital   porkolio   of   oral   produc3on.   Data   word   endings,   past   tense   verbs,   collec3on   for   individual   students   as   well   ques3ons   and   tag   ques3ons.     Tongue   as   the   en3re   class   can   be   done   quickly   twisters   provide   pronuncia3on   prac3ce   and  accurately. with   voiced   &   unvoiced   sounds   and   other   commonly   confused   beginnings   Video  Cameras. and  endings.   V i d e o   c a m e ra s   p r o v i d e   a n     As   students   advance,   so   can   the   u n l i m i t e d   re s o u rc e   fo r   c re a 3 n g   projects.    How-­‐to  projects,  informa3onal   assessments.    With   very   liIle   “training”,   v i d e o s   a n d   p u b l i c   s e r v i c e  ! PAGE 6
  7. 7. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 announcements   will   give   students   the   Name   your   equipment.     People   take   opportunity   to   not   only   speak,  but   also   care  of  pets,  not  things. write  and  read  in  English.       All   technology   in   my   classroom   is     Grading   is   much   easier   and   named  and  introduced  as  a  pet.     We  talk   convenient.     As   opposed   to   tradi3onal   about  each   item  and  what   it  needs  to   be   speaking   assessments,   you   have   the   safe,  healthy   and   happy.     Introduce   the   opportunity   to   use   the   videos   in   two   idea  of   personifica3on.     They   name   the   ways.    First,  grade  what  you  are  seeking.     items  and  check  them  daily  to  make  sure   Second,   collect   data   that  will   drive   your   they   are   s3ll   “healthy.”   Students   would   next   set   of   lessons.   For   example,   if   the   never  drop  a  puppy  on   the  ground;   they   target   language   for   an   assignment   is   to   should   carry   a   video   camera   or   laptop   listen   to   students   ask   each   other   about   computer   with  the  same  deference.    It’s   their   favorite   food,   you   can  listen   to   the   a  liIle  “cutsey”  but  it  works! ques3ons   and   answers.     In   those   answers,   you   will   catch   any   grammar,   Teach  nego6a6on  language  and  require   syntax   or   pronuncia3on   mistakes   that   them  to  use  it. you  need   to   address   with  your  students.       Inevitably,   you   will   come   across   These   mistakes   may   not   have   been   groups  of  students   who  do  not  work   well   caught   “in   the   moment’   with   more   together.     The   older   the   students,   the   tradi3onal  oral  assessments.   more   cri3cal   it  is   to   teach   them   how   to   nego3ate.     Adults   in   the   “real   world”   Classroom  management  Aps: must   work   together   on   projects.   Let   students   do   a   small   project   before   Nego3a3on   in  English  requires  advanced   you  do  much  instruc6on.   social   language   and,   in   many   cases,     Students  are  ready   and  oSen  think   understanding   the   subtle   subtext   of   themselves   able   to   use   technology   on   language.     their  own.     Un3l  they  have  had  a  chance     Technology  projects   should  not   be   to   get   their   hands   on   the   equipment,   frivolous,  extra  ac3vi3es.    They   can,  and   they  are  not  doing  much  listening.    ASer   should,   be   language-­‐rich   and   authen3c.   the   fact,  the   instruc3on   can   be   tailored   Keeping   the   language   forms   and   to   fit   what   students   don’t   know.     It   func3ons   available   for   students   at   all   provides   students  with   some   confidence   3mes   will   keep   them   on   task   and   make   in   themselves   and   authen3c   learning.     any   project—video,   digital   or   on   the   Plus,   there  may  be  students   with  a  great   computer—connected   to   your   TESOL   deal   of   knowledge   that   can   act   as   standards   and   provide   students   with   mentors  during  these  projects. invaluable  learning  tools.! PAGE 7
  8. 8. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 Time  to  Turn  the  Table by  John  Corcoran Some  of  you  may  think  I  am  old. I  did  not  learn  to  read  as  a  lad  of  eight. But,  in  my  mind  I  don’t  think  I  am  old. I  learned  to  read  as  a  man,  of  forty-­‐eight, When  it  comes  to  reading  I  am  bold, And  I  have  to  say  that  was  great. Or  so  I  have  been  told. But,  don’t  you  think  a  man  that  learned  at  forty-­‐ And  perhaps  I  am  bold,   eight Because  I  know  my  people  need  to  be  told. Could  have,  should  have  learned  at  eight. And  wouldn’t  that  have  been  great. It’s  true  a  teacher  can  never  really  succeed, Without  teaching  their  students  to  read. I  was  glad  and  not  mad. A  student  can  never  ever  really  succeed, But  I  must  admit  I  am  sad. Un3l  a  student  knows  how  to  read They  s3ll  call  us  learning  disable. A  fact  no  one  should  ever  concede, But  we  can  learn;  we  are  able. That  we  can  and  need  to  learn  to  read. Perhaps  is  3me  to  turn  the  table.   Call  it  what  it  is,  teaching  disable.   Street  smarts  and  an  observing  eye  may  get  you  by, But  inside  we  know  most  of  it  is  a  lie. Forget  about  the  shame  and  stop  the  blame. Without  out  a  full  deck  I  played  a  good  game. Cut  the  cards,  it`s  a  new  game,   But  in  the  game  of  life  I  always  felt  lame.   We  know  we  are  learning-­‐able You  need  the  full  deck  to  play  your  very  best, It’s  3me  to  STOP  using  the  lable  “Learning-­‐Disable”. Reading  the  printed  page  is  your  best  bet  to  pass   It’s  up  to  you  ;  it’s  your  deal.  Are  you  able? the  test. Speech Title/Synopsis - Testing the Ice: A family Legacy by Sharon Robinson From midwife to author and educator, Sharon Robinson learned the delicate art of risk taking from her famous parents, Jackie and Rachel Robinson. In 1947, Jackie Robinson shattered Major League Baseball’s color barrier. Today, he still holds the record for number of times he stole home during his famed ten years with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Building on this legacy of courage, Ms. Robinson partnered with Major League Baseball and Scholastic to develop Breaking Barriers: In Sports, In Life, a national character education program. Now in its 15th year, Breaking Barriers has reached over 19 million children. Using America’s sport, baseball, as a metaphor for life, the curriculum is based on the values associated with Jackie Robinson’s success on and off the field: Determination, Commitment, Persistence, Integrity, Justice, Courage, Teamwork, Citizenship, and Excellence. The heart of the program is the Breaking Barriers essay contest. The 2011 contest received nearly 10,000 essays from children across the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada who described their efforts to overcome personal barriers. In her talk, Sharon Robinson will share her family’s inspirational story using art and family photos along with reflections on lessons learned from children who have beaten the odds.! PAGE 8
  9. 9. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 TEACHING  TIPS:                             CONFERENCE  CALENDAR Random  Words                               Mark  your  calendar  now!   Prof.  Carmelo  Arbona,  Editor Don’t  miss  any  of  these  great  events  en  2011! AUGUST  13 When  introducing   parts  of   speech,   Vieques  Outreach which   can   be  so   tedious  to  some   students,  I  will    Vieques add  an  element  of  surprise:  randomness.   Eastern  Chapter   Ater   introducing   let’s   say   nouns   by   defining  what  they  are,  giving  examples  of   some   August  20 characteris3cs   of   nouns  (plurals,   proper   nouns,   Northern  Chapter collec3ve,   etc)   I’ll   write   on   the   board   the   numbers  from  1  to  10  or  1  to  15.  Then  I’ll  ask  the   Enjoying  What  We  Do students  to  call  out  random  nouns.     While  the  students  call  out,  I’ll  write  the   SEPTEMBER  10 words  on   the   board.     Also   I’ll  try   to  make   sure   Eastern  Conference that  we   get   an   appropriate   balance   of   persons,   places,   things,   and   ideas.     Students   paricipate   Character  Values  for  an  Effec3ve  Learning ac3vely   as   they   call   out.   Some3mes   a   student   may  call  out  a  word   that’s  not   a  noun   but   does   have  a   noun   form.   For   example,  a   student   may   OCTOBER  15 say  beauFful.  Ater  clarifying   that  the  word  is  not   Southern  Fall  Conference a  noun  but  an  adjec3ve,  we’ll  explore  the  term   to  determine  if  it  has  a  noun  form,  beauty.  Then    Pon3ficia  Universidad  Catolica, we’ll  add  it  to  the  list. Ponce  Campus   Once   the   list   is   complete,   I’ll   invite   the   students  to   write  a  paragraph   or  a  story  using  all   the  listed  nouns.  At  first,  they  students   think  it’s   NOVEMBER  18-­‐19 too   difficult,   but   as   they   begin   the   task,   they   soon  discover   they  can  do   it.  They  will  come  up    38TH  ANNUAL  CONVENTION  AND     with  such  a  wide  variety  of  stories.  It  becomes  an   EXHIBIT excellent  3me  for  sharing  their  wri3ng   with  their   Integra3ng  Ethics,  Values  and  Life  Skills   partners  or  to  read  aloud  to  the  class. in  the  Teaching  of  English   For   students   who   are   really   just   Puerto  Rico  Conven3on  Center beginning,   wri3ng   sentences   would   be   a   sufficient  task.  The  teacher  may  request  that  the   and  the  Sheraton  Hotel noun   be   exclusively   used   as   subject   of   the   sentence  or  object.     A   varia3on   of  this  then  would   be  to  use   other  parts  of  speech:  adjec3ves,  verbs,  adverbs,   or  pronouns.     For  homework   have   students  revise  and   rewrite   the   stories   at   home  to   turn   in   for   final   assessment.  Stories  can  be  added   to  their  wri3ng   porvolios.   S e n d   u s   y o u r   T e a c h i n g   T i p s   t o   tesolgrameditor@gmail.com  ! PAGE 9
  10. 10. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 Focusing  on  the  Academic  Needs   La3nos   25   and   over   had   earned   a   of  LaAno  Students bachelor’s   degree   or   higher.   In   by  Manuel  Hernandez  Carmona                   contrast,  32  percent  of  Whites   and  19   percent   of   African-­‐Americans   25   and   over   had   a   bachelor’s   degree   or   Focusing   on   the   needs   of   higher   (Digest   of   Educa3on   Sta3s3cs,   La3no   students   should   not   only   be   a   2007,  NCES,  2008,  Table).  La3nos   are   statement   made   by   President   Barack   i m p r o v i n g   i n   e d u c a 3 o n a l   Obama   but   a   top   priority   translated   achievement   but   not   as   rapidly   as   into  real  academic  policies.    There   are   other  groups.    What  happened  to  the   some   very   significant   sta3s3cs   dozens   of   thousands   of   La3nos   that   reve a l e d   i n   t h e   p re s e nta 3 o n ,   did  not  graduate  from  college?  Why  is   “Educa3onal   Equity   and   the   La3no   the   La3no   high   school   dropout   rate   Popula3on   of   the   United   States”   by   on  the   increase  again?  Despite  the  No   Francisco   L.  Rivera-­‐Ba3z,  presented   at   Child   LeS  Behind  Act  of  2001,  La3nos   Teachers  College,  Columbia  University   c o n 3 n u e   t o   q u i t   s c h o o l   a n d   on  February  21,  2008  on  the   status  of   inadvertently   fall   behind   in   their   La3no  educa3on.  About  20  percent  of   quest   of   the   so-­‐called   American   all   school   age   students   between   the   Dream.   What   academic   policies  is  the   ages   of   5   and   17   are   La3no   but   only   present   administra3on   crea3ng   as   a   13   percent   obtain   college   degrees.   result   of   the   already   shocking   Data   obtained   from   Rivera-­‐Ba3z’   sta3s3cs?   research   depicts   the   La3no   high   school  dropout  at  close   to  30   percent.     In   33   or   more   American   Because  the   La3no   school  popula3on   states,   standardized   exams   and   the   con3nues   to   surge   at   a   fast   and   S.A.T.’s   are   the   gateway   to   higher   furious   rate,   the   needs   of   La3no   educa3on,  but   without   a   high   school   students   must   be   met   with   a   clear   diploma,   what   kind   of   social,   present   vision   in   terms   of  what  to  do   economic   and   academic   horizons   can   and   how   to   tackle   their   academic   La3no   dropouts   count   on?   How   will   needs.     they   able   to   compete   in   America’s   demanding  workforce?   When   will   the   T h e   a c a d e m i c   n e e d s   U n i t e d   S ta t e s   D e p a r t m e n t   o f   represented  in  numbers  and  sta3s3cs   Educa3on   make   a  serious   recogni3on   are   alarming   and   reveal   a   huge   of   culturally   competencies   and   their   difference   between   La3nos,   their   ability   to   construct   bridges   to   make   White   counterparts   and   African-­‐ predic3ons   and   outcomes   about   a   Americans.   In   2007,   13   percent   of   poem,   a   story,   an   essay   or   a   drama  ! PAGE 10
  11. 11. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 read   in   the   English   classroom?   The   Obama   administra3on   must   set   an   U n i t e d   S ta t e s   D e p a r t m e n t   o f   example   of   the   change   in   curriculum   Educa3on   reading   program   is   in   dire   so   desperately   needed   in   schools   need   of   a   curriculum   change.   throughout   America.   Even   city,   state   President  Barak  Obama’s   past  poli3cal   and   na3onal   standardized   exams   campaign   focused   on   the   term,   should   include   a   more   varied   list   of   change.   Why   not   get   serious   about   authors.  How   can  you  engage  interest   changing   our   academic   policies   to   in   a  La3no   adolescent   by  reading  one   help  improve   the   quality   of  educa3on   poem   from   a   La3no   author   during   that   La3nos   and   other   Americans   Hispanic   Heritage   Month?     That’s   deserve  as  well? preposterous!   I   am   sure   Mar3n   Luther   King   was   envisioning   Barak   Scien3fically   based   research   Obama’s   swearing   in   as   President   of   has  validated  culturally  based  literature   the  United  States  in   2009.   That  was  a   as  key   in  the  early  stages  of   “learning  to   dream   come   true   for   billions   of   read”.   Prior   knowledge   helps   students   Americans,   but   La3nos   dream   today   to   build   bridges   to   make   predic3ons   of  a  beIer  and  quality  educa3on   that   and   outcomes   about   the   poem,   story,   can   really   make   a   difference   in   their   essay   or   drama   read   in   the   English   lives.  This   is   the  3me   to   focus   on   the   classroom.   Reading   for   pleasure   and   educa3on  of  La3nos  in  America! iden3ty   encourages   the   recently   (The   author   is   an   associate   at   arrived   student   to   make   personal   Souder,   Betances   &   Associates,   an   connec3ons.   In   a   “learning   to   read”   English   Staff   Development   Specialist  in   environment,   pleasure   and   enjoyment   Puerto   Rico   and   author/editor   of   the   form   the   ini3al   jump-­‐off   point   for   textbook,   La3no/a   Literature   in   the   further   literary   development.   When   English   Classroom,   Editorial   Plaza   students   construct   meaning   from   a   Mayor,  2003). personal   standpoint,  engagement   with   reading   develops   smoothly,   and   academic  success  is  just  a  step  away. The   US-­‐DE   reading   program   must   make   a   transi3on  from  its   hard-­‐ core  tradi3onalist  approach  to  a  more   integrated   reading  experience.  States   have   the   authority   to   design   their   own   literature   ini3a3ves,   but   the  ! PAGE 11
  12. 12. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 Reducing  Avoidable  Errors ques3ons   and   prac3se   the   spelling   and   by  Hazel  Davidson pronuncia3on  of  / /  and   are  confronted  a   ESL   teacher   from   Australia,   teaching   few   minutes   later   by   almost   every   English   to   adult   immigrants   (many   of   Slavonic   speaker   in   the   class   happily   whom   are   refugees)   from   S.   &   Central   wri3ng   wen   and   whit.     Or   we   list  words   America,  the  Pacific  islands,   SE  Asia,  the   with   the   digraph   au   and   see   because   Middle   East,   Europe   and   Africa.     Hazel   spelt   with   the   vowels   randomly   has   wriIen   with   her   colleague   Dorothy   rearranged  yet  again. Court   a   number   of   reading   and   spelling   Oh,  for  a  way  to  reduce  these  elementary   packages  for  very  low  level  classes  where   avoidable  errors! most   students   have   had   no   prior   schooling   and   are   illiterate,   not   only   in   Overview  of  idea:     English,  but  also  in  their  first  language.   ASer   years   of   tearing   my   hair   out   trying   to   find   some   solu3on   to   these   The  students:   sorts   of   problems,   I   aIended   a   session     The   students   for   whom   the   en3tled   Structured   monitoring   of   second   technique  below  can  be  applied   are  level   order   errors   presented   by   Eugene   3  or  level  4  in   the  Australian  system      At   Mogilevski   of   Monash   Univ.   at   the   level   3   students   are   expected   to   write  a   AFMLTA   Conference   in   Canberra,   July   report,  a   formal   leIer   and   a  discussion,   2001,   where   he   outlined   a   strategy   he   each  of  approximately  250  words   and   at   had   used   successfully   with   his   second   level   4   of   500   words,   with   reasonably   year   university   French   students.     He   accurate   grammar   and   spelling.     The   reported   a  40%   reduc3on   in   the   sorts   of   technique  is  not  appropriate  for  students   errors   I   had   been   trying   to   eliminate   in   at  lower  levels  than  this. my   students.     This   inspired   me  to   try   to   follow   his   example   and   to   modify   his   The  background:     LOTE   (Languages   other   than   English)     Like   most   ESL   teachers,   I   have   technique  to  suit  ESL  students. been   frustrated   on   numerous   occasions   by   elementary   errors,   which   students   Procedure:     repeat  over   and   over   again.     We   revise     As   recommended   by   Mogilevski,   I   the  simple  past  and  leave   it  on  the  board   spend   a  short   3me   (less   than   one   hour)   –   affirma3ve,   nega3ve   and   interroga3ve   discussing   with   the   students   the   effects   –   and   then   set   the   students   to   write   a   of  their  errors  of  na3ve-­‐English  readers:   recount,   only   to   find   their   wri3ng   • that   errors   which   are   more   or   less   liberally   splaIered  with  I  was  went,  they   inconspicuous   in   speech   are   quite   going,  he  go…    Or   we  go  through  the  wh  ! PAGE 12
  13. 13. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 confron3ng   to   a   na3ve   speaker   when   wrong  in   each  case.    The  very  elementary   they  appear  in  wri3ng;   errors  generally  drop  out  very  rapidly.   • that   the   students   therefore   make     I   repeat   this   procedure   with   each   themselves   appear   stupid   in   the   eyes   p i e c e   o f   w r i 3 n g   t h e y   c o m p l e t e   of  their  readers;   throughout  the  term   (10  weeks)  and   find   • that,  since   they  were  not  stupid,   they   they   take   a   very   ac3ve   interest   in   the   would   not   want   to   make   themselves   progress   of   their   own   scores   and,   in   a   appear  to  be  stupid.     n u m b e r   o f   ca s e s ,   b e co m e   q u i te     I  then  go  on  to  explain  to  them  the   compe33ve  about   their   results.     I  tell  the   procedures   I   intend   to   follow   in   an   class   who   has   scored   the   lowest   aIempt  to  help  them  reduce  their  errors.     propor3on   of   errors   each   3me.     In   my   This   consists   primarily   in   making   them   marking,   I   emphasise   the   improvements   conscious  of   their   frequent  problems   and   each   student   has   achieved   and   give   a   recording   their   progress   in   elimina3ng   chocolate   frog   (or   dried   apricot   because   the  avoidable  errors;    that  is,  those  errors   we   oSen  have  diabe3cs  in  our  classes)  as   where  they   actually   know  the  rules   quite   a  reward  to  each  student  who  halves  his/ well   and   which   they   nevertheless   repeat   her   error   rate.     I   also   point   out   that   frequently   through   carelessness   or   students   who   achieved   zero   or   almost   inaIen3on. zero   errors   on   one   piece   of   work   can     The  first  piece  of  wri3ng,  they  do  in   expect  occasional   reversals,  since  no-­‐one   their   usual   manner.     At   the   end   they   can  remain  perfect   all   the   3me.    I  do  this   count   the   number   of   words   they   have   because   I   am   aware   of   the   danger   of   wriIen   (including   ar3cles,   preposi3ons   pessimism   creeping   in   for   some   very   etc).    When  I  mark  the  work,  I  count  their   h i g h l y   m o 3 v a t e d   s t u d e n t s   i f   avoidable  errors,  the  errors  where   I  know   improvement  is  not  absolutely  consistent. they   are   well   aware   of   the   gramma3cal   rules,  and   the   spelling  errors   in   common   Conclusion: words   they   have   seen   and   used   many   By   the   end   of   the   term,   I   normally   find   3mes   before.     I   convert   this   error  count   every   student   has   improved   very   into   a  percentage  of   their  word  count  and   s i g n i fi c a n t l y.   T h e   m o s t   d r a m a 3 c   record   that   figure   in   my   notes   and   on   improvements   occur  in  the  first  two  weeks   their  marked  work  in  red  pen. and   aSer   that   the   vast   majority   of   the     When  I  return  their   work,  I   project   students   maintain   consistently   low   error   onto   the   white   board   a   list   of   avoidable   rates.   The   students   and   I   are   always   errors   they   have   collec3vely   made   and   delighted.   All   student   feedback   on   the   the   students   take   turns   around   the   class   technique  has  consistently  been  extremely   to   correct   the   errors   and   explain   what  is   posi3ve.! PAGE 13
  14. 14. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 To  Publish  Or  Not  To  Publish:   classroom-­‐   ac3on  research,  Dr  Julia   Reyes,   An  Ethical  Dilemma  For  AcAon  Research   t h e   d i r e c t o r   o f   t h e   C e n t r o   d e   Teachers   Inves)gaciones   e  Innovaciones   Educa)vas   y   Etnogra=cas   (CIIEE)   of   the   Department   Petra  E.  Avillan-­‐Leon,    M.Ed.  ESL,   of   Educa3on   of   Puerto   Rico   (DEPR)     who   Ac3on  Research  Mentor would   constantly   tell   us   to   publish.   The   teachers   who   par3cipated   in   the   Ac3on   Research   Workshops   offered   by   the   CIIEE                     In  today’s  globalized  world  more  and   from  the  year  2002  to   2006,  were  ini3ated   more   we   are   invited   to   publish   through   in   ac3on   research    with   the   texts   by   Julia   the  ever-­‐  growing  technological  media.  We   Blández  and  Antonio  Latorre  and    we  were   read   people’s   opinions   about   everything   mentored   by   educators   such   as,   Dr.   that  happens   both   locally   and   globally   on   AnneIe   López  de   Mendez   and   Dr.  Yanira   blogs,  in  wiki’s  and  through  emails,  among   Raices,     among   other   educators   from   the   others.   But   we   hardly   read   teachers’   most   pres3gious   local   universi3es.   As   we   opinions   on   issues   related   to   educa3onal   ventured   into   the   wonderful   world   of   policies,  teaching  strategies   that  really   do   ac3on  research,  we  learned  about  how  we   work,   reflec3ons   on   their   role   in   society,   could  influence   educa3onal  policy,  change   standardized   tes3ng   or   classroom   or   enrich   curriculum,   improve   our   situa3ons.   The   local   educa3onal   agency   teaching   prac3ces   and   con3nue   our   (LEA)   readily   and   recurrently   issues   development  as  educators.  We   discovered   comments   that  indicate  how  teachers   are   that  we   had   “exper3se”,  a  quality   usually   working  towards  the   country’s  educa3onal   adjudicated   to   external   educa3onal   goals   and   what   parents,   students   and   researchers,   to   university   professors   or   society  expect  from  them.  When  teachers   experts   in   other   fields.   One   major   meet   at   workshops,   training   sessions   or   difference   was   constantly   clear,   to   be   con3nued   educa3on   classes   a   catharsis   considered   experts  we   needed   to   publish.   occurs.  They  share   their  ideas,  frustra3ons   It   was   in   this   aspect   of   research   that   we   and   concerns;  oSen   3me   concluding   that   confronted  our  ethical  dilemma;  to   publish   the   system   does   not  understand   them,  is   or  not  to  publish. unfair   in   its   evalua3on   or   is   poli3cally   inclined   towards   a   posi3on   that   usually                    But,  what  is  an  ethical  dilemma?   At   affects   adversely   the  public  opinion  about   present   we   are   very   much   aware   of   the   teachers. importance   of   ethics.   It   has   become   the   badge   that   poli3cians,   educators,   and                    As   a   teacher,  I   have   par3cipated  of   business   people   wear   on   a   daily   basis.   these   events   but   with   one   difference,   I   There   are   campaigns   on   the   values   that   always  think  of  the  words  of   my   mentor  in   create   character   and   there   are   na3onal  ! PAGE 14
  15. 15. P R T E S O L - G R A M! AUGUST 2011 and   local   ini3a3ves   to   develop   ethics   in   where  are   the   results   published?    How   the  workplace  and  in  our  society.  It  is  an   can  the  educa3onal  community  benefit   issue   that   moves   governments   and   from   their  findings?   How  can   our   best   marks   ci3zens.   Consequently,   teachers   prac3ces   be   considered  and  eventually   are   not   exempt   of   its   effects.   Ac3on   influence   curriculum   choices   and   research   teachers   when   deciding   on   educa3onal  policy?  To  publish  or  not  to   conduc3ng  research   about  their   prac3ce   publish  is  in  fact  an  ethical  dilemma.   find   themselves   confronted   with   two   profeavillan@msn.com     alterna3ves:   “Should   I   publish   my   hIp:// findings   and  put  myself  in   the  eye  of  the   areyouac3onresearcheducators.yolasite. observer     and   expose   myself   to   com   cri3cism?”  or,  “Should  I   keep  my  findings   to   myself   and   learn   from   my   errors   or                                                 successes?”  Moreover,  many  teachers  on   References   a  daily  basis   do  small  scale  inves3ga3ons   Blandez,   J.   (2000).   La   Inves3gación-­‐ of   their   teaching   prac3ces   or   students’   acción:  Un  reto  para  el  profesorado.  Guia   development   without   the   rigors   of   an   prác3ca   para   grupos   de   trabajo,   ac3on   research   project;   oSen   3mes   seminarios   y   equipos   de   inves3gacion.   because   they   have   not   been   instructed   Barcelona:INDE. on   the   ac3on   research   process.   Consequently,   when   we   think   of   the   Bausela,   E.  (2005).   La   docencia   a   través   ethics   of   the   researcher   we   must   also   de   la   inves3gación-­‐acción.   Retrieved   in   consider  this   dilemma.  Do  teachers  avoid   May   2006  from   hIp://www.une.edu.ve/ publishing   their   best  prac3ces   or   ac3on   uneweb2005/servicio_comunitario/ research   findings   because   they   are   inves3gacion-­‐accion.pdf unsure   of   the   process   and   its   ethical   COPE   CommiIee   on   Publica3on   Ethics.   consequences?   Are   teachers   aware   that   (2011).  Retrieved  in  June  2011  from         they   should   publish   when   they   have                    hIp://www.publica3onethics.org/       done   an   ac3on   research   project?   Is   the   LEA   complying   with   the   requirement   of   E t h i c s   i n   E d u c a 3 o n a l   R e s e a r c h   teaching   the   ac3on   research   process   to   (annotated   bibliography).   Retrieved   in   teachers   if   they   expect   them   to   do   June  2011  from         classroom  research?                      hIp://www.aare.edu.au/ethics/         The   DEPR   in   its   Curricular   aareethc.htm Framework   published   in   2003,   states   that  teachers   do  ac3on   research.  I  ask   myself,   if   teachers   do   ac3on   research,  ! PAGE 15

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