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Acep research talk 2012 builds

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David Feinstein Talk support

David Feinstein Talk support

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  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • Fifty adolescents who had been orphaned and traumatized twelve years earlier by the ethnic cleansing and warfare in Rwanda still exhibited symptoms of PTSD. Most were well above the cutoff for PTSD on two standardized measures, one a self-report inventory and the other an inventory completed by one of their caretakers at the orphanage. After a single imaginal exposure/acupoint session of 20 to 60 minutes combined with approximately six minutes learning two relaxation techniques, the average scores on both measures were substantially below the PTSD cutoff ( p < .0001 on each). On the caretaker inventory, only 6% of the adolescents scored within the PTSD range after treatment vs. 100% prior to treatment ( p < .0001). Interviews with the adolescents and their caretakers indicated dramatic reductions of symptoms such as flashbacks, nightmares, bedwetting, depression, withdrawal, isolation, difficulty concentrating, jumpiness, and aggression. Post-tests and follow-up interviews one year later showed that the improvements persisted. Sakai, C.S., Connolly, S. M., & Oas, P. (in press). Treatment of PTSD in Rwandan child genocide survivors using Thought Field Therapy. International Journal of Emergency Mental Health.
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT with 16 abused male adolescents in Peru, which like the Rwanda study used only a single exposure/acupoint session, 100% in the treatment group ( n = 8) went from above to below PTSD thresholds thirty days after treatment while none in the wait list control group ( n = 8) showed significant change. Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009, October). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 - 19, 2009. Retrieved October 27, 2009, from http:// soulmedicineinstitute.org/children.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • In an RCT completed in 2010, 42 military veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to a treatment group or a wait-list control group. Thirty-two of the initial participants completed the study, including 19 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Pre- and post-treatment assessments included two standardized self-report inventories: (a) the military version of the Post-Traumatic Stress Checklist, a self-inventory that correlates well with clinician-rated assessments of PTSD, and (b) the Symptom Assessment 45. Six hour-long sessions using an exposure/tapping protocol were administered to each participant in the treatment group. The initial mean PCL-M score was 60.5 for the treatment group and 63.5 for the wait-list group. The PTSD cutoff is 50. The mean score after six treatment sessions had decreased to 36.8, substantially below the PTSD cutoff, while it was essentially unchanged (61.4) for the wait-list group a month after the initial testing ( p < .001). The breadth of psychological distress as measured by the SA-45 had also diminished significantly at the end of treatment ( p < .001), as had the severity ( p < .001). Both measures remained stable for the control group. Church, D., Hawk, C., Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., & Stein, P. (2010, April). Psychological trauma in veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A randomized controlled trial. Poster session at the 31st Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, April 7-10, 2010. Retrieved April 20, 2010, from www.stressproject.org/documents/ptsdfinal1.pdf
  • Transcript

    • 1. Energy Psychology Research Overview David Feinstein, Ph.D. Innersource © 2012
    • 2. How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping
    • 3. Throwing Down the GauntletHow the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping
    • 4. Throwing Down the GauntletHow the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping February 1985
    • 5. Throwing Down the GauntletHow the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping
    • 6. Throwing Down the GauntletHow the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping February 1985
    • 7. Throwing Down the GauntletHow the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping
    • 8. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990s
    • 9. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990sTFT with 714 Patients
    • 10. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990sTFT with 714 PatientsAverage of 2.2 Sessions
    • 11. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990sTFT with 714 PatientsAverage of 2.2 Sessions31 Conditions or Diagnostic Categories
    • 12. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990sTFT with 714 PatientsAverage of 2.2 Sessions31 Conditions or Diagnostic Categories Improvement at .001 in 28 Categories
    • 13. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint Tapping1990sTFT with 714 PatientsAverage of 2.2 Sessions31 Conditions or Diagnostic Categories Improvement at .001 in 28 Categories Improvement at .05 in the Other 3
    • 14. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSouth America
    • 15. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSouth America11 Allied Clinics
    • 16. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSouth America11 Allied Clinics31,400 Patients Tapping
    • 17. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSouth America11 Allied Clinics31,400 Patients Tapping1989  2003
    • 18. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSouth America11 Allied Clinics31,400 Patients Tapping1989  200336 Clinicians (23 MDs, 2 RNs, 11 MAs)
    • 19. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients
    • 20. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients CBT Group TappingPositiveClinicalResponseCompletefreedom fromsymptoms
    • 21. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients CBT Group TappingPositiveClinical 63%ResponseCompletefreedom fromsymptoms
    • 22. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients CBT Group TappingPositiveClinical 63% 90%ResponseCompletefreedom fromsymptoms
    • 23. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients CBT Group TappingPositiveClinical 63% 90%ResponseCompletefreedom from 51%symptoms
    • 24. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study One – 5000 Patients CBT Group TappingPositiveClinical 63% 90%ResponseCompletefreedom from 51% 63%symptoms
    • 25. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients
    • 26. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients No CBT Group Tapping Symptoms Number of SessionsMean Number of Sessions
    • 27. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients No CBT Group Tapping Symptoms Number of 9 - 20 SessionsMean Number of Sessions
    • 28. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients No CBT Group Tapping Symptoms Number of 9 - 20 1-7 SessionsMean Number of Sessions
    • 29. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients No CBT Group Tapping Symptoms Number of 9 - 20 1-7 SessionsMean Number 15 of Sessions
    • 30. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Two – 190 Patients No CBT Group Tapping Symptoms Number of 9 - 20 1-7 SessionsMean Number 15 3 of Sessions
    • 31. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Three – 78 Patients
    • 32. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Three – 78 Patients Panic Tapping Needles (38) Disorder (40) Positive Response
    • 33. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Three – 78 Patients Panic Tapping Needles (38) Disorder (40) Positive 77.5% Response
    • 34. Throwing Down the Gauntlet How the Mental Health Community Learned about Acupoint TappingSub-Study Three – 78 Patients Panic Tapping Needles (38) Disorder (40) Positive 77.5% 50% Response
    • 35. Throwing Down the GauntletCarl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and OtherAreas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural Disasters
    • 36. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified Resolved
    • 37. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified ResolvedKosovo 189 187 547 545
    • 38. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified ResolvedKosovo 189 187 547 545SouthAfrica 97 97 315 315(Zulus)
    • 39. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified ResolvedKosovo 189 187 547 545SouthAfrica 97 97 315 315(Zulus)Rwanda 22 22 73 73
    • 40. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified ResolvedKosovo 189 187 547 545SouthAfrica 97 97 315 315(Zulus)Rwanda 22 22 73 73The Congo 29 28 78 77
    • 41. Throwing Down the Gauntlet Carl Johnson’s Statistics After Visits to Kosovo and Other Areas of Ethnic Cleansing, Warfare, and Natural DisastersCountry: # of Clients # Treated # of Traumas # Completely Successfully Identified ResolvedKosovo 189 187 547 545SouthAfrica 97 97 315 315(Zulus)Rwanda 22 22 73 73The Congo 29 28 78 77TOTALS 337 334 1016 1013
    • 42. Throwing Down the Gauntlet 5 Minute-Phobia Cure
    • 43. Throwing Down the Gauntlet 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients
    • 44. Throwing Down the Gauntlet 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients 31,400 South America Patients
    • 45. Throwing Down the Gauntlet 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients 31,400 South America Patients 334 Traumatized Survivors
    • 46. Throwing Down the Gauntlet# of Peer-Reviewed RCTs in 2002 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients 31,400 South America Patients 334 Traumatized Survivors
    • 47. Throwing Down the Gauntlet# of Peer-Reviewed RCTs in 2002 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients 31,400 South America Patients 334 Traumatized Survivors
    • 48. Throwing Down the Gauntlet X# of Peer-Reviewed RCTs in 2002 5 Minute-Phobia Cure 714 Kaiser Patients 31,400 South America Patients 334 Traumatized Survivors
    • 49. A Decade Later – 2012
    • 50. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports
    • 51. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of Report
    • 52. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7
    • 53. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8
    • 54. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14
    • 55. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22
    • 56. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22 18 Were Randomized (RCTs)
    • 57. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22 18 Were Randomized (RCTs) ~ 10 of 18 reached .001 level of significance
    • 58. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22 18 Were Randomized (RCTs) ~ 10 of 18 reached .001 level of significance Remaining 8 reached .05 level
    • 59. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22 18 Were Randomized (RCTs) ~ 10 of 18 reached .001 level of significance Remaining 8 reached .05 level ~ Strong effect sizes across studies
    • 60. A Decade Later – 2012Literature Search of Peer-Reviewed Energy Psychology Outcome Reports Type of ReportCase Study: 7Systematic Observation: 8Uncontrolled Outcome Study: 14Controlled Outcome Study 22 18 Were Randomized (RCTs) ~ 10 of 18 reached .001 level of significance Remaining 8 reached .05 level ~ Strong effect sizes across studies Review of General Psychology (in press)
    • 61. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 min
    • 62. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD
    • 63. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- RatingCare-Giver Rating
    • 64. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72%Care-Giver Rating
    • 65. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18%Care-Giver Rating
    • 66. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18%Care-Giver 100% Rating
    • 67. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18%Care-Giver 100% 6% Rating
    • 68. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18% 16%Care-Giver 100% 6% Rating
    • 69. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18% 16%Care-Giver 100% 6% 8% Rating
    • 70. 50 Teens – Rwanda Orphanage -- 1 TFT Session of 20-60 minPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After 1-Year Treatment Treatment Follow-up Self- Rating 72% 18% 16%Care-Giver 100% 6% 8% RatingInternational Journal of Emergency Mental Health, 2010
    • 71. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCT
    • 72. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuse
    • 73. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores
    • 74. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on PTSD Scales
    • 75. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on PTSD 36 Scales
    • 76. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on PTSD 36 3 Scales
    • 77. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on PTSD 36 3 Scales p < .0001
    • 78. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on 32 Before PTSD 36 3 Scales p < .0001
    • 79. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on 32 Before PTSD 36 3 31 After Scales p < .0001
    • 80. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on 32 Before PTSD 36 3 31 After Scales p < .0001
    • 81. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on 32 Before PTSD 36 3 31 After Scales p < .0001 Large Effect Size
    • 82. 16 Adolescents – 1 EFT Session -- RCTPeru, males, ages 12 – 17, with a history of abuseChanges in PTSDScores Before After Control Treatment Treatment GroupScore on 32 Before PTSD 36 3 31 After Scales p < .0001 Large Effect Size Church et al., Traumatology, 2011
    • 83. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide
    • 84. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide(Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT)
    • 85. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide(Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores
    • 86. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT group74 assigned to wait-list group
    • 87. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT 45.0 group74 assigned to wait-list group
    • 88. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT 45.0 26.9 group74 assigned to wait-list group
    • 89. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT 45.0 26.9 group74 assigned to wait-list groupPre-/Post p < .001
    • 90. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT 45.0 26.9 group74 assigned to wait-list 44.6 groupPre-/Post p < .001
    • 91. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned to TFT 45.0 26.9 group74 assigned to wait-list 44.6 40.7 groupPre-/Post p < .001
    • 92. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned 72%  to TFT 45.0 26.9 39% group74 assigned to wait-list 44.6 40.7 groupPre-/Post p < .001
    • 93. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned 72%  to TFT 45.0 26.9 39% group Moderate to Large Effect74 assigned Sizes to wait-list 44.6 40.7 groupPre-/Post p < .001
    • 94. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned 72%  to TFT 45.0 26.9 39% group Moderate to Large Effect74 assigned Sizes to wait-list 44.6 40.7 Gains Held on group 2-Yr Follow-UpPre-/Post p < .001
    • 95. 145 Adult Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide (Presenting with PTSD Symptoms – 1 TFT Session – RCT) Severity of Symptoms Scores Pre- Post- In PTSDParticipants Treatment Wait or Tx Range Scores Scores71 assigned 72%  to TFT 45.0 26.9 39% group Moderate to Large Effect74 assigned Sizes to wait-list 44.6 40.7 Gains Held on group 2-Yr Follow-UpPre-/Post p < .001 Sakai & Connolly, 2012
    • 96. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT
    • 97. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores
    • 98. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-MPTSD Cutoff = 50
    • 99. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-MPTSD Cutoff 61.4 = 50
    • 100. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-MPTSD Cutoff 61.4 34.6 = 50
    • 101. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-MPTSD Cutoff 61.4 34.6 = 50 p < .0001
    • 102. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-M 61.4 34.6 66.6 BeforePTSD Cutoff = 50 p < .0001
    • 103. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-M 61.4 34.6 66.6 BeforePTSD Cutoff = 50 65.3 After p < .0001
    • 104. 59 Vets with PTSD Symptoms – 6 EFT Sessions – RCT Changes in PTSD Scores Before After Control Treatment Treatment Group PCL-M 61.4 34.6 66.6 BeforePTSD Cutoff = 50 65.3 After p < .0001Church et al., in press, Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease
    • 105. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions
    • 106. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat Veterans
    • 107. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat VeteransPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD
    • 108. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat VeteransPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement
    • 109. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat VeteransPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement 100%
    • 110. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat VeteransPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement 100% 60%
    • 111. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat VeteransPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement 100% 60% 50%
    • 112. 12 CBT/Exposure Sessions 24 Combat Veterans Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement 100% 60% 50%“This trial provides some of the most encouraging results of PTSD treatment for veterans with chronic PTSD.” – Monson et al., J Consulting and Clinical Psychology
    • 113. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies
    • 114. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT StudiesPercent Meeting Criteria for PTSD
    • 115. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 12 CBT Sessions (24 Veterans)
    • 116. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 12 CBT Sessions (24 Veterans)
    • 117. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 12 CBT Sessions 100% (24 Veterans)
    • 118. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 14% 12 CBT Sessions 100% (24 Veterans)
    • 119. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 14% 12 CBT Sessions 100% 60% (24 Veterans)
    • 120. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 14% 0% 12 CBT Sessions 100% 60% (24 Veterans)
    • 121. Loose Comparison of Major CBT and EFT Studies Percent Meeting Criteria for PTSD Before After No Treatment Treatment Improvement6 EFT Sessions (49 Veterans) 100% 14% 0% 12 CBT Sessions 100% 60% 50% (24 Veterans)
    • 122. Does Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?
    • 123. 91 Earthquake Survivors in China with PTSDDoes Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?
    • 124. 91 Earthquake Survivors in China with PTSDDoes Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?Cognitive Behavior Therapy  Significant Improvement
    • 125. 91 Earthquake Survivors in China with PTSDDoes Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?Cognitive Behavior Therapy  Significant ImprovementCBT + Acupoint Stimulation  Greater Improvement
    • 126. 91 Earthquake Survivors in China with PTSDDoes Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?Cognitive Behavior Therapy  Significant ImprovementCBT + Acupoint Stimulation  Greater ImprovementCBT + Acupoint Stimulation Exceeded CBT at p < .01
    • 127. 91 Earthquake Survivors in China with PTSDDoes Acupoint Stimulation Improve CBT Outcomes?Cognitive Behavior Therapy  Significant ImprovementCBT + Acupoint Stimulation  Greater ImprovementCBT + Acupoint Stimulation Exceeded CBT at p < .01 Adding acupoint stimulation led to significantly stronger results than cognitive-behavior therapy used alone. – Zhang et al. (2011) Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine
    • 128. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI
    • 129. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions Wait List
    • 130. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 Wait List
    • 131. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 Wait List BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 132. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 6.1 Wait List BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 133. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 6.1 Wait List BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 134. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 6.1 Wait List 20.3 BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 135. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 6.1 Wait List 20.3 18.0 BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 136. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Stats Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Sessions 23.4 6.1 Wait List 20.3 18.0 BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 137. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Stats Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Significance Sessions 23.4 6.1 P < .001 Wait List 20.3 18.0 BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 138. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Stats Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Significance Sessions 23.4 6.1 P < .001 Cohen’s d: 2.28 Wait List 20.3 18.0 = Large Effect Size BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression 10 – 18 = Mild Depression 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 139. 18 College Students Scoring in the Moderate to Severe Depression Range on the BDI Before After Stats Treatment Treatment 4 90-Min EFT Significance Sessions 23.4 6.1 P < .001 Cohen’s d: 2.28 Wait List 20.3 18.0 = Large Effect Size BDI Scores: < 10 = No Depression Church et al. (in press). 10 – 18 = Mild Depression Depression Research and 19 – 29 = Moderate Depression Treatment. > 29 = Severe Depression
    • 140. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:
    • 141. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions
    • 142. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal acces
    • 143. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal access• Precise changes in neural pathways
    • 144. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal access• Precise changes in neural pathways• Reduced cortisol levels
    • 145. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal access• Precise changes in neural pathways• Reduced cortisol levels• Increased production of serotonin, opiods, and other neurotransmitters associated with pleasure.
    • 146. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal access• Precise changes in neural pathways• Reduced cortisol levels• Increased production of serotonin, opiods, and other neurotransmitters associated with pleasure.• Stress-reducing genes are activated
    • 147. Observed or hypothesizedbiochemical effects of acupointtapping while a problem is mentallyactivated:• Reduced limbic threat reactions• Greater hippocampus and prefrontal access• Precise changes in neural pathways• Reduced cortisol levels• Increased production of serotonin, opiods, and other neurotransmitters associated with pleasure.• Stress-reducing genes are activated• Aberrant brain wave patterns are normalized
    • 148. Conclusions of EP Research Surveypublished in Review of GeneralPsychology :
    • 149. Conclusions of EP Research Surveypublished in Review of GeneralPsychology :• A review of current evidence revealed that the use of acupoint stimulation in treating psychological disorders has been examined in a number of studies that met accepted scientific standards.
    • 150. Conclusions of EP Research Surveypublished in Review of GeneralPsychology :• A review of current evidence revealed that the use of acupoint stimulation in treating psychological disorders has been examined in a number of studies that met accepted scientific standards.• These studies have consistently demonstrated strong effect sizes and other positive statistical results that far exceed chance after relatively few treatment sessions.
    • 151. Conclusions of EP Research Surveypublished in Review of GeneralPsychology :• A review of current evidence revealed that the use of acupoint stimulation in treating psychological disorders has been examined in a number of studies that met accepted scientific standards.• These studies have consistently demonstrated strong effect sizes and other positive statistical results that far exceed chance after relatively few treatment sessions.• Investigations in more than a dozen countries by independent research teams have all produced similar results.

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