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Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project
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Tredyffrin Township - Sidewalk Project

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Tredyffrin Township is in the process of installing sidewalks. Residents have become outraged by the lack of planning, the abuse of stimulus funds, the destruction of 80-100 year old trees and overall …

Tredyffrin Township is in the process of installing sidewalks. Residents have become outraged by the lack of planning, the abuse of stimulus funds, the destruction of 80-100 year old trees and overall impact on the community.

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  • 1. YARDSidewalk ProjectYARD FOR A Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road October 1, 2007 BOS Presentation
  • 2. The following letter was presented to the BoS 10/07 along with a petition singed by the residents As  a  resident  on  the  South  side  of  Old  Lancaster  Road  (between  Daylesford  Sta:on  and  Conestoga  Road),  I’m  forwarding   this  to  you  as  a  request  that  you  implement  the  YARD  FOR  A  YARD  proposal.   Background:  We  realize  that  TE  has  every  inten:on  of  implemen:ng  the  sidewalk  project.  Of  course  those  most  vocal  in   support  are  not  those  on  the  South  side  who  have  just  learned  how  the  plan  impacts  their  property.  We  recognize   that  we  are  absolutely  at  the  mercy  of  the  BOS.  While  we  have  brought  up  concerns  at  the  public  mee:ngs,  the   responses  have  con:nuously  been  that  we  are  not  to  worry,  that  this  is  a  planning  phase  and  that  the  studies  and   surveying  were  for  exploratory  purposes  only.  Further,  we  were  promised  to  be  kept  up  to  date  regarding  the  layout   (reference  final  ques:on  from  June  Q&A:  hTp://www.tredyffrin.org/pdf/community/Q&A%20from%206-­‐6-­‐07%20STAP%20Mee:ng.pdf).   You  may  find  it  unfair  that  this  is  your  first  formal  no:ce  that  residents  are  reques:ng  a  YARD  FOR  A  YARD.  We   understand  that.  We  too  find  it  unfair  that  last  week  was  the  first  :me  we  were  provided  a  diagram  that  illustrates   the  actual  impact  to  our  proper:es  and  the  fact  that  this  isn’t  “exploratory”  –  that  the  engineer  expects  to  be  able  to   send  the  final  plan  to  the  DOT  in  by  mid-­‐month.  Un:l  last  week,  the  only  thing  we’ve  seen  is  the  map  that  iden:fies   where  we  have  sidewalks  today  and  where  the  township  proposes  to  add  them.    Proposal:  YARD  FOR  A  YARD  is  a  proposal  (personal  request)  made  by  the  residents  on  the  South  side  of  Old  Lancaster.   We  believe  that  it  will  help  alleviate  what  is  otherwise,  an  unfair  burden  placed  on  us.  Under  a  YARD  FOR  A  YARD,   we  ask  for  the  following:  Shid  the  current  design  by  3’  towards  the  North  side  of  Old  Lancaster.   For  the  South  side  residents:   Saves  a  significant  por:on  of  mature  landscaping  &  placement  of  fences;   Area  of  easement  u:lized  is  reduced  from  the  planned  22’  down  to  19’;   Significantly  reduces  the  loss  of  exis:ng  driveway  space;   Provides  approximately  90%  of  the  residents  the  opportunity  to  save  what  is  currently  “yard  space”  –  placing  the   construc:on  primarily  along  the  current  shoulder;     And  shows  us  that  you  listen  and  respond  to  tax-­‐payers  when  they  offer  a  compromise.  
  • 3. Continued… For  the  North  side  residents:   Minimal  impact  to  property  (approximately  14’  of  the  25’  easement);   Ability  to  enjoy  sidewalk  without  having  any  responsibility  towards  it;   And,  promotes  a  “neighborly”  culture  (leaves  the  S.  side  less  defensive).   For  pedestrians:   A  3’  shid  to  the  North  does  not  impact  them  one  way  or  another  –  if  anything,  more  shade  to  walk  in.   For  the  Township:   Support:  of  tax-­‐payers/voters  to  move  on  to  Phase  II;   Tax  dollars:  While  property  value  will  s:ll  be  impacted  (prospec:ve  buyers  recognize  they  have  sidewalk  responsibili:es,   no  parking  for  guests,  minimal  front-­‐footage),  the  impact  is  reduced  to  an  extent  by  virtue  of  the  fact  that  there   remains  mature  landscaping  and  the  sidewalks  are  that  much  further  from  front  doors,  3’  of  driveway  saved,   reduced  incen:ve  to  put  homes  on  the  market;   And  apprecia4on  of  residents  and  voters  that  recognize  that  you  listened  and  reacted  on  our  behalf.  We  have  no  power   –  you  serve  as  our  voice.   Conclusion:  As  a  :ghtly  knit  neighborhood,  we  will  do  our  best  to  work  together  helping  our  elderly  neighbors  with  their   sidewalks  responsibility  and,  also  maintain  our  own.  We  will  do  our  best  to  take  care  of  the  landscaping   responsibili:es  that  accompany  the  bump-­‐outs.  We  will  try  to  keep  the  neighborhood  safe  and  friendly  and  work   together  to  find  common  ground  when  it  comes  to  the  further  complicated  parking  situa:on.     What  we  ask  that  you  do  in  return  is  to  shid  the  design  by  three  feet  (a  yard)  to  save  our  yards!  The  YARD  FOR  A  YARD   proposal  requests  that  tax-­‐payers  (not  budgets)  be  the  driver  for  the  final  design.   Respecmully,   Residents  of  the  South  side  of  Old  Lancaster  Road  
  • 4. Conestoga Students Heading to Their Cars Ample shoulder – currently used (safely … and without sidewalks) Note: Students park up to 20 cars per day along Old Lancaster (Daylesford section). These students “walking” to their parked cars were included in the survey TE conducted to validate the need for sidewalks. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 5. Historic Homes Are Those Most Impacted Most homes on the North side were built after 1950. Most homes on the South side were built before 1950. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 6. 1135 Old Lancaster Road – built in 1929 Sidewalk edge (current plan) vs. edge if “A Yard” was added Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 7. 1149 Old Lancaster Road – built in 1929 Properties were constructed with safe & ample room for walking as shown in this photo. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 8. 1145 Old Lancaster – built in 1929 ___ (red line) depicts the planned edge of the sidewalk. Shifting road 3’ to the North (left) saves the trees, bushes and 3’ of current driveway. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 9. 1131 Old Lancaster – Built in 1929 Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 10. North Side of Old Lancaster Facing East North Side of Old Lanc facing West (showing 10’ between white line and utility pole. We’re merely requesting that 3’ of it be utilized - that the existing white line be pushed 3’  this direction. Shifting the plan 3’  this direction (and there’s ample room) saves a “yard”  this side of the road even though this side still takes on the sidewalk. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 11. #1111 (built in 1926) and 1117 Old Lancaster Planned sidewalk edge Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 12. 1111 and 1101 Old Lancaster – both built in 1926 The hedge and tree shown in this photo could be spared if you gave them “a yard.” Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 13. 1085 Old Lancaster – built in 1900 Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 14. The Dannaker’s Property Water main in path of sidewalk (blue portion of measuring tape = proposed edge of sidewalk). 3’ saves the yard from being dug-up, save current walkway, hedge and driveway. Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 15. 1201 Old Lancaster This tree will cut down unless you give it ‘a yard.’ Planned edge of sidewalk Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 16. 1217 Old Lancaster Old Lancaster Road October 1, 2007 Daylesford Station thru Conestoga Road BOS Presentation
  • 17. So What Did the Township Do? Before & After Photos Sidewalk Project South-side of Old Lancaster Road
  • 18. Before and After 1135 Old Lancaster Road Before After Equally drastic is the change in view looking “out” our windows. Full-disclosure: the township is replacing the trees… the replacements have (wait for it…) 2” trunks. Gee, thanks
  • 19. Before and After Before After It’s almost unrecognizable.
  • 20. Before and After Before After •  Exposed much?
  • 21. Before and After •  In front of one of TE’s oldest houses Before After
  • 22. 2 Examples of the Trunk Size 42” trunk 36” trunk These majestic trees will be replaced with trees that have between 1.5” and 2” trunks
  • 23. Before and After Before After •  So much for privacy
  • 24. TE Has Spoken •  You will give up your land like it or not. In fact, we’re taking 15’ deep x property width (> 2,000 s/f ) •  You will have a 5’ sidewalk, a 5’ sidewalk extension and a 2’ shoulder. While the SCHOOL doesn’t even have this overkill, you will because you are on a State owned road. •  We will continue to tax your property as if it were the original parcel. It doesn’t matter that 2,000 s/f of it has been converted to public property. •  We will take your trees and landscaping. Sucks for you that our replacement trees won’t be worth 1/10th of the cost we can get for selling your trees as firewood. •  We will take the coveted parking that you depended on when you bought your house. It is of no concern to us that contractors, public safety, friends & family will have no where to park. •  You will maintain the sidewalk -like it or not. In fact, if you don’t, you will be fined $600/day. •  You will be responsible for daily watering and care of the new grass and trees plantings. Not our problem if you don’t have time (work/travel) and the new plantings die. •  If a driver hits the curb and doesn’t own-up to it, you (the homeowner) will be made financially responsible even if the damage was the results of a Pa DOT plow or a drunk driver. •  You will be responsible for the safety of pedestrians. If someone trips or slips in front of your house, it’s you that they must take to court. The township is making you legally responsible. •  You will figure out how to shovel 750 s/f +/-. It doesn’t matter that NONE of you have a garage (room for a snow blower) and therefore, will need to shovel by hand or pay someone. We will not help you get rid of snow. We will not reduce your property tax to accommodate the loss of land. We’ll take & take. We’re giving you ‘nothing.’ We won’t even consider a split in the share of maintenance and repair. While we “could” have budgeted a couple hundred dollars for tree replacement along the State owned sections (significant land-loss & tree age), we won’t. We’ll give you 1.5”-2” tree trunks because really, 4” tree trunks is asking too much.
  • 25. Tree Facts Large trees are great stormwater control. At maturity, they intercept, over 1,000 gallons of rainwater each year. Their foliage and bark reduce runoff by intercepting rainfall, and their broad–leaf canopies also reduce the force of rain hitting the soil, reducing erosion. Source: Monthly Stormwater Planner for Residents of Chester and Delaware Counties •  Trees renew our air supply by absorbing carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. •  The amount of oxygen produced by an acre of trees per year equals the amount consumed by 18 people annually. One tree produces nearly 260 pounds of oxygen each year. •  One acre of trees removes up to 2.6 tons of carbon dioxide each year. •  Shade trees can make buildings up to 20 degrees cooler in the summer. •  Trees lower air temperature by evaporating water in their leaves. •  Tree roots stabilize soil and prevent erosion. •  Trees improve water quality by slowing and filtering rain water, as well as protecting aquifers and watersheds. •  The cottonwood tree seed is the seed that stays in flight the longest. The tiny seed is surrounded by ultra-light, white fluff hairs that can carry it on the air for several days. Source: http://www.treesaregood.com/funfacts/Environment.aspx
  • 26. This one block alone lost 7 trees (shown in red) X X X X X X X
  • 27. Value* Before and After These 7 trees alone ‘earned’ an estimated $1,645/year…and of course there are many additional benefits (wind-protection, privacy, history, aesthetics…) that add personal value. Trunk size of 30” = $235/ Trunk size of 2” = $6/ tree tree “Many people don’t realize, however, that plants have a dollar value of their own that can be measured by competent plant appraisers. If your trees or shrubs are damaged or destroyed, you may be able to recapture your loss through an insurance claim or as a deduction from your federal income tax. “ Hmmm… wonder if that applies when the federal government funded the ‘loss’… *Source: treesaregood.com
  • 28. FYI: Sidewalk Repair Costs http://www.costhelper.com/cost/home-garden/sidewalk-repair.html •  Although sidewalks are usually built on a public right-of-way on the edge of a property, in many areas the property owner is financially responsible for installing and maintaining the sidewalk and replacing it if it becomes cracked or damaged. Some cities have 50-50 programs where either city staff or a hired contractor does the work, then the city bills the homeowner for half the cost of the new sidewalk. In other places, especially in new developments built in the last few decades, homeowners are responsible for all the costs, and may hire their own contractor to build a sidewalk or replace a damaged one. Typical costs: •  Hiring a contractor to pour a concrete sidewalk runs around $5 -$9 a square foot, or $1,500 -$2,250 for a sidewalk 5 feet wide and 50 feet long. Depending on the type of finish used, costs can be as high as $10 - $18 or more a square foot, or $2,500 -$4,500 for a 5-by-50-foot sidewalk. •  Materials and rental tools for a DIY project run about $3 -$4 a square foot, or $750 -$1,000 for a 5-by-50- foot sidewalk. •  Most sidewalks are repaired by removing and replacing the old concrete, but if the damage is minimal (short cracks only 1/4 to 1/2 inch wide or if a portion of the sidewalk is raised no more than 1 to 1-1/2 inches) repairs may be possible. For small cracks you can patch the concrete with ready-mix concrete patch, concrete grout or caulk. For a slightly raised edge you can grind it down. Do-it-yourself materials will cost $10 -$50, depending on materials used and whether you need to rent a masonry grinder. •  Hiring a handyman or concrete worker to do simple patching or grinding runs about $50 -$200, depending on the amount of work needed (and most contractors won't handle jobs this small). Some cities will do minor patching work then bill the homeowner, and grinding down a raised portion might be done by city employees at no charge. However, patching or grinding a sidewalk is often considered a temporary fix, and eventually it may be necessary to remove and re-pour the concrete. (And some cities require replacement rather than repair.) Tredyffrin is installing “best management practice” sidewalks. The costs will obviously be much higher than the estimates above. Homeowners are responsible for sidewalks AND bump-outs. PennDOT isn’t likely to be sensitive to that when they take their oversized plows down Old Lancaster, so I asked TE to comment (BoS Meeting) on what estimated repair costs would be for homeowners. They ignored my request.
  • 29. 50/50 Sidewalk Program I brought the following examples to the BoS, Steve Burgo & the sidewalk committee to see if TE would be willing to consider a similar plan. They ignored the request. •  City of St. Louis http://stlcin.missouri.org/FAQs/displaytopicdetail.cfm?TopicID=567 Sidewalk repair and maintenance is legally the responsibility of the property owner. Likewise, owners must maintain a path on their sidewalk that is free from snow and ice. The City does, however, offer a program called the 50/50 Sidewalk Program in which the City covers 1/2 the costs of replacing sidewalks, and bills the owner for the rest of the cost. To qualify for the 50/50 sidewalk program your property must be single-family, 2-family, or 4-family, and owner-occupied. •  City of Evanston http://www.cityofevanston.org/departments/publicworks/transportation/sidewalk.shtml •  Beleville, IL http://belleville.wliinc2.com/city/departments/50-50SidewalkApplication.pdf

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