Mapping the Project<br />
Mapping the Process<br />Organize Tasks and Activities<br />Multiple projects may be required<br />Learning journals might...
Group Dynamics<br />
Why Use Groups?<br /><ul><li>Committed to it based on research and observation*
Simulates the “real world” - use of teams
High motivation when actively involved
Learn more fully and with less effort
Learn in context</li></ul>*Springer, Stanne, & Donovan. 1999. Review of Educational <br />Research 69:21-52.<br />
Suggestions for Getting Started<br /><ul><li>In your class...
Explain to students why learning in groups is a good strategy.
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Mapping the project

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Transcript of "Mapping the project"

  1. 1. Mapping the Project<br />
  2. 2. Mapping the Process<br />Organize Tasks and Activities<br />Multiple projects may be required<br />Learning journals might be used<br />Decide Project Launch<br />Determine Group Dynamics – (Task Roles, Roleplay Roles, <br />Gather Resources<br />Draw a Storyboard- <br />Launch<br />Sequence of activities<br />Draft dates and Due dates<br />Scaffold Lessons<br />Check for HW assignments<br />Check for reflection and review<br />
  3. 3. Group Dynamics<br />
  4. 4. Why Use Groups?<br /><ul><li>Committed to it based on research and observation*
  5. 5. Simulates the “real world” - use of teams
  6. 6. High motivation when actively involved
  7. 7. Learn more fully and with less effort
  8. 8. Learn in context</li></ul>*Springer, Stanne, & Donovan. 1999. Review of Educational <br />Research 69:21-52.<br />
  9. 9. Suggestions for Getting Started<br /><ul><li>In your class...
  10. 10. Explain to students why learning in groups is a good strategy.
  11. 11. Ask students to report on past experiences (good and bad!).
  12. 12. Talk about the group as a support mechanism.
  13. 13. Use group warm-up activities.</li></li></ul><li>Suggestions When Forming Student Teams<br />Instructor-selected vs. Student-selected teams?<br />Strive for heterogeneity across<br />Gender<br />Ability level<br />Skills<br />Avoid the “fifth wheel” syndrome<br />
  14. 14. Interesting Activities to Do with Groups<br /><ul><li>Use your imagination!
  15. 15. Consider methods for forming and reforming groups
  16. 16. What roles can students play within their groups? Should these be rotated?
  17. 17. Technology can enable new opportunities, including cross-class and virtual teams</li></li></ul><li>Rotating Roles<br /><ul><li>Discussion Leader</li></ul>Keeps group on track; maintains full participation<br /><ul><li>Recorder</li></ul>Records assignments, strategies, unresolved issues, <br />data; convenes group outside of class<br /><ul><li>Reporter</li></ul>Reports out during whole class discussion; writes<br />up final draft of assignments<br /><ul><li>Accuracy Coach</li></ul>Checks group understanding; finds resources<br />
  18. 18. Role Categories<br /><ul><li>Task Based
  19. 19. Content or Interest Based
  20. 20. Role Based</li></li></ul><li>Jigsaw Group Scheme<br />1 2<br />3 4<br />1 2<br />3 4<br />1 1<br />1 1<br />2 2<br />2 2<br />Rejoin<br />home groups<br />1 2<br />3 4<br />1 2<br />3 4<br />3 3<br />3 3<br />4 4<br />4 4<br />4 home groups,<br />with 4 members each<br />4 new expertgroups, with one representative from each home group<br />(Aronson et al. 1978. The Jigsaw Classroom. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.)<br />

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