Let's Hit the Road! Lesson Design for Connected Learning
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Let's Hit the Road! Lesson Design for Connected Learning

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Let's Hit the Road! Lesson Design for Connected Learning

Let's Hit the Road! Lesson Design for Connected Learning

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  • 1. Design for Connected Learning Elizabeth H. Eastman Let’s Hit the Road! ★ Training Site link: bit.ly/intrepidchrome
  • 2. Under Construction 1. Significant Content 2. Guiding Questions 3. Inquiry 4. Critique & Revision 5. Public Audience Reference: http://bie.org/about/what_pbl
  • 3. First Project? ● 1 curriculum area (integrated with literacy standards) ● limited student product types Cross-Curricular Project! (down the road) Widen Scope to ... ● 2 weeks + ● multiple subjects (integrated with literacy standards) ● more complex product and technology options ● community outreach & presentation to more public audience Getting Started Limit Scope to ...
  • 4. To begin, consider... Which instructional standard(s) do I want to transform? ● What engaging, relevant, problem or challenge could students attempt that is related to key concepts and skills? ● How might students be asked to work collaboratively as part of this study?
  • 5. Inquiry ...students are able to work without relying on teacher too much, take initiative, stay on task, find resources, learn from each other, and solve problems + Independence ...students engaged in process of asking questions, investigating answers from range of sources and developing answers to share.
  • 6. Define the assignment with its intended outcome. This may sound like you’re working backwards … you are. Map out the end result before students begin the assignment.
  • 7. Time frame? ➔ Curriculum maps & pacing guides ➔ Time allocations for subject areas Core content knowledge, priority standards? ★ 1-3 standards from academic content area ★ Map curriculum to prioritize content for assignments/projects ★ Unpack standards in curriculum guides to design project lessons, products, and assessments closely aligned with standards Scope
  • 8. (20) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the influences of science and technology on contemporary societies. The student is expected to: (A) give examples of scientific discoveries and technological innovations, including the roles of scientists and inventors, that have transcended the boundaries of societies and have shaped the world; (B) explain how resources, belief systems, economic factors, and political decisions have affected the use of technology; and (C) make predictions about future social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental impacts that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations. (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts; (C) record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes; (D) identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and (E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources. 25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) compiles important information from multiple sources; 7th Science TX-TEKS 7th ELA TX-TEKS
  • 9. Essential Question ...focus for project work and captures task students are engaged with in broad open-ended form.
  • 10. ❏ Broadly encompass a hierarchical structure of guiding questions. ❏ Frame to promote higher level thinking. ❏ Link and anchor concepts together. Writing an Essential Question ...As an umbrella for guiding questions.
  • 11. Essential Questions ❏ Frame unit of study & Connect what is learned to real world ❏ Require critical thinking to answer ❏ Allow students to form original ideas instead of pre-determined answers. ❏ Point students toward key ideas & main concepts we want them to understand ❏ Asked & re-asked
  • 12. Weather & Natural Disasters
  • 13. Ecosystems
  • 14. Break down Essential Question * Link key ideas & sub-topics to essential question. ★ What caused this? ★ Who is involved? ★ Why did this happen? ★ How does this affect you personally? ★ How does this affect your community? ★ How are relationships formed and made? ★ How does this affect other aspects that are linked to this topic? Guiding Questions
  • 15. (20) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the influences of science and technology on contemporary societies. The student is expected to: (A) give examples of scientific discoveries and technological innovations, including the roles of scientists and inventors, that have transcended the boundaries of societies and have shaped the world; (B) explain how resources, belief systems, economic factors, and political decisions have affected the use of technology; and (C) make predictions about future social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental impacts that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations. (23) Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to: (A) follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts; (C) record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes; (D) identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and (E) differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources. 25) Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that: (A) compiles important information from multiple sources; 7th Science TX-TEKS 7th ELA TX-TEKS
  • 16. Assessment Evidence of learning? a. Product? - students ‘create’ b. Performance? - students ‘do’ Alignment c. assess content knowledge and understanding separate from other skills i. web -notes- draft
  • 17. Rubrics ★ Provide criteria to students ★ Creators - Rubistar & PBL Checklists ■ Better option--build with students a set of criteria ■ Show them examples of evidence in student work. ■ Have them apply criteria to examples at different levels of quality
  • 18. Using Google Forms for Grading Rubrics (Google Guru)
  • 19. 1. Developing habits of digital citizenship & collaboration. 2. Modeling appropriate use of technology tools for learning purposes. 3. Guiding steps in research process, citing sources, and how to avoid plagiarism. Reality Check...
  • 20. Revision & Reflection ...students have processes for giving/receiving feedback and to think about how and what they are learning. Revision leads to higher quality work.
  • 21. ...students present their work to audiences beyond their classmates and teacher(s) Audience
  • 22. -- > Higher Quality Work! Fuel for Critique and Revision
  • 23. Models of digital citizenship and appropriate use of technology tools for learning purposes.
  • 24. Give the writer a compliment. * I like how you wrote about... Make a connection to the writer. Add new information or ideas to what the student has shared. * This reminds me of... Ask the writer at least one question. * (I wonder...) (Why...?) (How...?) Commenting Guidelines: Always go back and re-read your comment to edit or revise your writing
  • 25. ❏ Short but complete enough to make sense. ❏ Written in your own words. ❏ Use phrases instead of complete sentences. ❏ Connect to your questions & focus on important ideas. ❏ Useful, meaningful, and easy to read. NOTES are…
  • 26. Citing Sources
  • 27. Roles & Products * Options for product creation * Both individual and team products to show what was learned * Real- world Roles-- > Real-world Products ★ Engineer -- Plan, drawings, or model or design of system or structure with explanation, ★ Scientist -- design for experiment, written/oral report of research findings, informational video, website, slides etc ★ Business Person -- business plan, written report for investors or supervisors