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IB PYP School Community Pres

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  • Kids doing research projects at learn quickly that real research means a lot more than just doing a search on Google or Ask Jeeves. They discover that the best way to find things out often means consulting a variety of different media and using a number of different approaches. They also learn that electronic resources vary widely in quality and that many sources available for free on the web aren't suitable material on which to base one's research. We help them out by providing PRIVATE DATABASE LIBRARIES , excellent electronic collections that students can use both in our facility and from home to safely and reliably research both academic topics and subjects they're interested in personally. Our parents love them 'cause their kids can work on research projects using their home computers and access a body of information that's not only 100% reliable, but is also 100% free from pop-up-ads and pornography.  In the library, kids are taught to use these potent tools as part of their total information toolkit when they do research projects.   Kids are learning how to… recognize a need for information identify and locate appropriate information sources know how to gain access to the information contained in those sources evaluate the quality of information obtained organize the information use the information effectively
  • Aramco offered a fully funded professional dev. Program in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to examine Saudi education, culture, history, and global relations through site visits, panel discussions, and cultural activities in the cities of Dhahran, Riyadh, and Jeddah. From being an insular society, Saudi Arabia is increasingly opening its doors. Saudi Arabia has always taken a leading role in Islamic and Middle Eastern Affairs but now there is a genuine desire to be understood by the wider world and for people to have a better appreciation of Arab life, art and culture. Understanding each other: It is important that they grow up understanding that other countries are not just pictures in books and a list of facts and figures. They must appreciate, above all, that a country such as Saudi Arabia is made up of people and families just like their own. They should learn to develop a mutual trust and understanding of each other’s beliefs and lifestyles. We are not trying to change or influence these beliefs; just the reverse, in fact. You’ll have to abandon many of your basic assumptions to understand it; must look at the people, culture, history with fresh eyes.
  • CULTURAL PATTERNS: (on continuum) Emphasis on worth and fulfillment of individual Secular-religion compartmentalized and not part of everyday life Egalitarian(by belief but this may be a myth in actuality) Gender integrated-fewer norms and formal rules about roles and relationships among men and women. Independence is valued. Beliefs are questioned. Most values and beliefs and values are open to question Time is perceived as rigid and moving in a straight line; time is attributed with economic value.
  • From being an insular society, Saudi Arabia is increasingly opening its doors. Saudi Arabia has always taken a leading role in Islamic and Middle Eastern Affairs but now there is a genuine desire to be understood by the wider world and for people to have a better appreciation of Arab life, art and culture. What slowly evolved in Europe over several centuries has taken merely decades in Saudi. It has brought many advantages to Saudi society, but has required careful thought and management by the Kingdom’s leaders because Saudi is not just another developing country, but is also the keeper of the two holy mosques at Medinah and Makkah. Progress has to be balanced against the country’s important religious role, in this respect. The government aims to maintain a balance between progress and a cultural heritage that has its roots in Islam. While technology and scientific developments have arrived in Saudi Arabia with great speed, it takes time for people to come to terms with new ways of doing things, and time to question and debate the rights and wrongs of different systems and lifestyles. Saudi Arabia is an evolving nation of great contrast, where some of the most modern cityscapes in the world mix with ancient crafts and tribal traditions. For anyone to make a balanced judgment on the Kingdom today, they must take into account the speed at which the country has been thrust into the 21st century, and the delicate cultural balancing act that the Kingdom’s rulers must follow in their role as chief spiritual and moral custodian of the Muslim faith worldwide
  • HOSPITALITY!
  • The modernization process, which lasted for centuries in the West, has been compressed into decades, putting great stress on traditional societies Oil – the black gold: When most people think about Saudi Arabia, they think of oil. Unevenly distributed around the world, about 50% of all known global reserves are found in the Middle East. Oil discovered in 1938. Standard Oil of CA= ARAMCO; 1973 25% ownership; 60% 1974; 1980 100%. First CEO took over in 1984. Has brought enormous opportunities for development. Saudis live tax-free and are guaranteed free health care and education to university level. Of all the Arab countries, Saudi Arabia holds the largest reserves, some 25% of the global total. By exporting this oil, Saudi Arabia has been able to generate huge wealth that has enabled the country to embark upon a dramatically rapid period of development, transforming the Kingdom in less than 70 years from a rural economy to a modern, vibrant and predominantly urban one, with four-lane highways, universities and some of the most impressive, hi-tech buildings in the world. In 1970, it was estimated that half of the country’s population lived in rural areas. Today, it is less than 10%, as people have left the desert and moved to the rapidly-growing towns and cities. Gov’t trying to diversify the economy to develop other industries (construction, The media frequently remind us just how important Saudi Arabian oil is to the world, but little attention has been paid to the impact that this discovery has had on the people who live there. During this period of rapid, oil-funded evolution, the government has worked hard to ensure that Saudi culture is not lost amidst the arrival of McDonalds, and other western influences. n 1950, the capital city of Riyadh was a sleepy, mud-bricked oasis town, home to 60,000 people. Today, utility companies cannot keep pace with the new housing developments as the city sprawls across the desert. With a population estimated to be around 4.5 million, it is the Kingdom’s largest urban centre. If London had undergone a similar pattern of growth over the last 60 years it would be home to a mind-boggling 57 million people, rather than the 7.2 million it is today. These statistics make the Kingdom one of the most rapidly-growing countries in the world today. There are a number of factors behind this. Fertility rates amongst Saudi women are very high – the average woman bears more than six children in her lifetime. Rapidly improving healthcare has seen life expectancy increase, with a corresponding decrease in infant mortality. These factors combine to give an annual growth rate of 3.5% Water? aquifers, or water-bearing layers of sedimentary rock, constitute the country's major source of water, known as groundwater. Water has accumulated in these areas over a period of 40,000 years, and the. has been the largest and most important for many years, but in current climate conditions is considered non-renewable, and under severe threat through increasing population and agriculture. An increasingly important source of water is from the sea. Saudi Arabia is now the world's largest producer of desalinated water, producing 30% of the global total, and over 80% of all that is produced in the Middle East. Every day, the country's 30 desalination plants pump almost 600 million gallons of water through nearly 2,000 miles of pipeline, meeting 70 per cent of the Kingdom's needs for drinking water. More such plants are planned to cope with the increasing demand. Another expanding source of water is treated urban wastewater. It is estimated that approximately 40 per cent of the water used for domestic purposes in urban areas could be recycled. The Ministry of Agriculture and Water has constructed a recycling plant in Riyadh that provides more than seven million cubic feet of treated wastewater.
  • INDUSTRY: Oil & Modernization: It would be impossible to exaggerate the impact of discovery of oil on the Arabian peninsula. It has created cities out of nowhere. Since its’ discovery in 1938, roads have been built linking its major cities. 1000 miles of roads in 1960, 91,000 in 1997. Thousands of schools have been built, increasing the literacy rate dramatically (men 84.7%, women 7o.8%). Hospitals, airports, and apartment buildings have been built, health and other services provided by the government. Billions have been spent to create more of its scarcest resource—water; desalination plants have been constructed to remove salt from sea water making it usable for drinking and irrigation. With all of this rapid modernization, change is inevitable, Attempting to create a balance between change and tradition, looking for ways to modernize the nation, using the latest technologies while holding to its traditional valuesand preserving its heritage and culture. Saudi Arabia has become a predominantly urban society with many people moving to the cities. The capital city of Riyadh (see Riyadh in Cities factfiles) was as recently as 1960 a remote, oasis-based mud-bricked community of less than 60,000 people. Today, less than 50 years later, it is home to over four million people, and must rank as one of the fastest-growing urban areas in the world. Saudi Arabia has become a predominantly urban society with many people moving to the cities. The capital city of Riyadh (see Riyadh in Cities factfiles) was as recently as 1960 a remote, oasis-based mud-bricked community of less than 60,000 people. Today, less than 50 years later, it is home to over four million people, and must rank as one of the fastest-growing urban areas in the world. Before the oil boom years of the 1960s, much of Arabia remained a distinctly rural, desert-based economy. Cities were small communities with mud-bricked palaces surrounded by high clay walls. Roads were almost non-existent. It is almost impossible to believe the impact that the discovery of oil has had on Saudi Arabia, and there can be few countries in the world that have developed and grown so quickly. Arabia as a whole has seen more change in the last six decades than it has witnessed in the last ten centuries. Arabia’s fast growing population (22 million people today, compared to 12 million 20 years ago) have witnessed these changes within their own lifetime. Standards of living have improved dramatically as a result of comprehensive development programmes supported by the enormous oil wealth. Employment: As these large numbers of young people seek to enter the workplace, they provide the government with a significant challenge – create enough jobs to avoid high levels of unemployment. Each year it is estimated that nearly 300,000 young people enter the workforce in an environment that provides less than 200,000 jobs. This challenge has been approached in two ways, firstly through diversification and expansion of the economy creating more jobs, and secondly, through the process of ‘Saudisation’ which involves the replacement of large numbers of foreign workers in the country with Saudi people. Fully one quarter of the country’s workforce is made up of foreign nationals. (Westerns and TCN’s) During the oil boom years of the 1960s and 1970s countries throughout the gulf region sought large numbers of expatriate workers to provide the skills and manpower to enable them to embark on huge oil funded construction and development projects. Hospitals, housing, universities, schools, airports and roads appeared at an extraordinary rate, with large numbers of the construction workers originating from less-developed nations in Asia, and most of the white collar engineers and managers bringing their skills from the western nations. Such was the magnitude of this influx that today there are about six million expatriate workers in the Kingdom, mostly male, making up a substantial proportion of the workforce. This situation is slowly changing as Saudis acquire the vocational and technical skills to manage their own development.
  • The single most important thing to know about Saudi Arabia is that is sacred territory. As the birthplace of Islam, the land itself is revered by Muslims around the world. Westerners may tend to view S.A. as a big empty desert with lots of oil under it. If you think of the country as one big shrine, you’ll be closer to the way a large part of humanity views it. For the world’s one billion Muslims, Saudi Arabia embodies the purest and most authentic ideals of their faith. It contains Islam’s holiest sites, and millions of pilgrims around the world travel there every year. Occupies special place in Islamic world as birthplace and heartland of Islam. Islam defines S.A. identity. Shari’a or Islamic Law is the basis for the nation’s constitution, legal system, business affairs, and public policies. Public practice of any other religion is illegal. E.coast are Shiite Muslims. Sexes are strictly segregated in public although educational and job opportunities for women are increasing. Islam requires its believers to perform 5 basic religious duties called the 5 Pillars of Islam. One of these is prayer (Salah). Muslims required to pray 5 times a day-dawn, noon, afternoon, sunset, and evening. Times vary depending on time of sunrise and sunset. Call to prayer summons faithful at the proper time. While prayers are done in mosques, they don’t have to be.; may pray at home, work, or in public. Important to pray at right time and bowing in direction of Mecca. Prayer times are published in newspapers, and schedules are available.Everything grinds to a halt during those hours for about 30 minutes. Friday is the Muslim holy day, and a weekly sermon is offered at most mosques after the noon prayer. Offices and shops have a series of 2 to 3 hour windows between prayer times. Only Muslims may enter holy cities.
  • With all of this rapid modernization, change is inevitable, Attempting to create a balance between change and tradition, looking for ways to modernize the nation, using the latest technologies while holding to its traditional values and preserving its heritage and culture.
  • Women: It covers the body, reflecting Islamic ideals of modesty. Islamic law requires a woman to dress modestly. People have different interpretations of modesty. Variety of headscarves reflects varying degrees of modesty. (Scarf covering only the hair, veil that shows only the eyes, a veil that covers the face completely. Abaya=loose fitting cloak, normally black, is worn over women’s other clothing. Most conservative will cover hands with gloves. In privacy of own home, may wear loose-fitting brightly colored traditional dress with jewelry or high-fashion western style clothes.Only friends and family will see. Covered with abaya always in public. Accompanied by male relative when leaving the house; Everything has separate facilites for men and women or is open only for single sex use (banks, schools, waiting rooms, restaurants, buses) Discriminatory practices not only prevalent, but required by Islamic Shari’a law. A women’s testimony does not carry the same weight as that of a man. Testimony of one man equals that of 2 women. According to religious law, and social custom, women have the right to own property and are entitled to financial support from their husbands and male relatives. Few social and political rights, not treated as equal members of society. Women who breach strict dress code face arrest by religious police. Daughters receive half the inheritance awarded to their brothers. Women’s freedom of movement is severely restricted. May not legally drive. Dependent on men for any transportation. May not travel abroad without the written consent of male relative. Despite limited opportunities, some female citizens are able to study abroad and return to work in professions such as architecture, law and journalism.
  • REFORM: Women’s role in society is expanding. Developments in women’s participation in business—open by Saudi Arabian Investment Authority of all female investment center in Riyadh to facilitate investment in local businesses by citizen and foreign women. Jeddah Economic forum devoted time to discussing role of women in domestic and international business. Increased attention in press to women’s issues. Issues: gender discrimination, health, employment, driving, legal problems women face doing business. Hospitals are now required to report any suspicious injuries to authorities. Islam: The single most important thing to know about Saudi Arabia is that is sacred territory. As the birthplace of Islam, the land itself is revered by Muslims around the world. Westerners may tend to view S.A. as a big empty desert with lots of oil under it. If you think of the country as one big shrine, you’ll be closer to the way a large part of humanity views it. For the world’s one billion Muslims, Saudi Arabia embodies the purest and most authentic ideals of their faith. It contains Islam’s holiest sites, and millions of pilgrims around the world travel there every year. Occupies special place in Islamic world as birthplace and heartland of Islam. Islam defines S.A. identity. Shari’a or Islamic Law is the basis for the nation’s constitution, legal system, business affairs, and public policies. Public practice of any other religion is illegal. ecoast are Shiite Muslims. Sexes are strictly segregated in public although educational and job opportunities for women are increasing. Islam requires its believers to perform 5 basic religious duties called the 5 Pillars of Islam. One of these is prayer (Salah). Muslims required to pray 5 times a day-dawn, noon, afternoon, sunset, and evening. Times vary depending on time of sunrise and sunset. Call to prayer summons faithful at the proper time. While prayers are done in mosques, they don’t have to be.; may pray at home, work, or in public. Important to pray at right time and bowing in direction of Mecca. Prayer times are published in newspapers, and schedules are available.Everything grinds to a halt during those hours for about 30 minutes. Friday is the Muslim holy day, and a weekly sermon is offered at most mosques after the noon prayer. Offices and shops have a series of 2 to 3 hour windows between prayer times. Only Muslims may enter holy cities.
  • CULTURE: Dress Saudi clothing is always respectful of Islamic values – modesty is important at all times for both sexes. Modest dress: traditional clothing for both men and women is long, loose and flowing, head coverings to protect from hot sun; climate and custom. Men cover head, and body from wrist to ankles to follow Islamic code of modest dress. Men=ankle length robe called a thobe. Buttons to neck and has sleeve cuffs. Headcloth is ghutra, red and white checked or pure white. Double ring of black cords or rope that encircles the ghutra and hold it in place (agal). Underneath, skullcap. The loose, flowing garments are still the most practical clothes for wearing in the heat. Both men and women cover their heads when outdoors, both as protection from the burning sun and also for religious reasons. Many women in Saudi Arabia today wear western-style clothing such as jeans and T-shirts. However, Islamic values of modesty are always observed and this means covering the limbs and the head – sleeves or trousers are long and necklines not too low. Outside the home many women wear an abaya, a long, usually black garment which covers them from neck to floor. A Saudi woman will always cover her head when going outside with a scarf. Women may also choose to wear the traditional thobe , like men, or a fustan, which is a long-sleeved, ankle-length, loose dress made of silk or cotton.
  • EDUCATION: Curriculum dominated by Arabic studies (language, history, and literature) and religious studies, geography, math, and science. At university, women have segregated classes taugh only by women. Progress made—literacy from near 0 in 50’s to near around 75% for adults. Yet Saudi education remains geared to rote memorization and religious indoctrination rather than independent thinking. Little exposure to other cultural traditions. Many learn English, but can’t take courses on Italian literature for example.
  • Education in Saudi Arabia is segregated by sex and divided into three separately administered systems: general education for boys, education for girls and traditional Islamic education (for boys). The Ministry of Education, established in 1952, presides over general education for boys, and education for girls comes under the jurisdiction of the General Presidency for Girls' Education. Both sexes follow the same curriculum and take the same annual examinations.

Transcript

  • 1. Research Specialist & Program of Inquiry
    • Assist our students in becoming active and effective users of information and ideas.
      • Instruct them in using strategies to access, evaluate and use information.
      • Help to develop habits of independent research in our students.
      • Collaborate with teachers to encourage students to become information literate, independent in their learning, and socially responsible in their use of information and technology.
    • Help to provide the resources needed to support our school's academic goals.
    • Assist teachers with the support they need to develop information literate students
  • 2. Educators to Saudi Arabia Program
  • 3.
    • Saudi Cultural Patterns
    • Emphasis is on the group.
    • Religious—everything has a spiritual dimension or aspect.
    • Hierarchical and male-dominated.
    • Gender separated-strong norms and formal rules about male and female roles and relationships.
    • Interdependence is valued.
    • Traditional ways or beliefs are unquestioned or unchallenged.
    • Relationship to time is fluid and functional. Things are done when appropriate, not by the clock.
  • 4.  
  • 5. Hospitality
  • 6. By exporting oil, Saudi Arabia has been able to generate huge wealth that has enabled the country to undergo a rapid period of development, transforming the Kingdom in less than 70 years from a rural economy to a modern, predominantly urban one .
  • 7. A Modern Nation & Ancient Culture Saudi Arabia’s people have witnessed incredible changes within their own lifetimes.
  • 8. Birthplace and Heartland of Islam Islam defines Saudi Arabia’s identity and is the basis for the nation’s constitution, legal system, business affairs, and public policies.
  • 9. Globalization and the attempt to create a balance between change and tradition.
  • 10. Role of Women in Saudi Society
  • 11. Reform
  • 12. Importance of Modesty
  • 13. Education Curriculum is dominated by Arabic studies (language, history, and literature) and religious studies, geography, math, and science.
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16.