ISSUES IN MUSEUMS  AS CONSIDERED IN 2003 <ul><ul><ul><li>This was written as a teaching power point to aid discussion for ...
Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A movement to place museums within a framework of social responsibility and to assert a...
In the area of exhibition  PRESENTATION,  the following issues have taken prominence. Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A...
CONTENT: Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A beginning look at the issue of timeliness. </li></ul><ul><li>The use of mult...
ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT: Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A much broader range of acceptable sources of income. </...
RESEARCH Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A reduction in research funding but an understanding that some forms of resear...
Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 COLLECTIONS <ul><li>A broadened definition of “real” objects to include photos, movies, reprodu...
FACILITIES Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>The most coveted architectural contract. </li></ul><ul><li>World-class archi...
MUSEOLOGY Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>Broader interest in learning theory and its applicability. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Education – in addition to class visits Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>Inclusion of charter schools as part of museum ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Museum Ideas Of The Last Decade

3,425

Published on

Written in 2003 and reedited for this website, Museum Ideas is a power point created to generate discussion about the direction museums might be going and available options. It has been used as a starter discussion with museum students and practicioners.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,425
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
127
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Museum Ideas Of The Last Decade

  1. 1. ISSUES IN MUSEUMS AS CONSIDERED IN 2003 <ul><ul><ul><li>This was written as a teaching power point to aid discussion for a classroom of practitioners and/or museology students. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>While still applicable, there may be issues you would like to amend or add to. Feel free to do so. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Anyone is welcome to use this for their own purposes. I would appreciate credit whenever you use it. I would love to see your amendments as well. Thanks. Elaine Heumann Gurian </li></ul></ul></ul>Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003
  2. 2. Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A movement to place museums within a framework of social responsibility and to assert a place in the creation of local civil society. The words “meeting ground,” “forum,” “gateway” and “crossroads” are to be found in mission statements. </li></ul><ul><li>There is an overt interest in the novice learner, the child, the social unit of the family rather than only the adult and the expert visitor. </li></ul><ul><li>Acceptance that museums are positive factors in the tourist and economic mix of revitalization. </li></ul>In the critical area of DIRECTION, VISION AND MISSION: There has been --
  3. 3. In the area of exhibition PRESENTATION, the following issues have taken prominence. Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A broadened palette of interpretive exhibition techniques which include many elements of shop window display, attraction gizmo’s, simulations, and object theatre. </li></ul><ul><li>A heightened sense of permissible drama rather than only an air of contemplative study </li></ul><ul><li>An increased reliance on technology and a willingness to explore new edges of technology invention including hand-helds, wireless, animation, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>A broadened definition of “real” objects to include photos, movies, reproductions, multiples, etc as authentic. </li></ul>
  4. 4. CONTENT: Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A beginning look at the issue of timeliness. </li></ul><ul><li>The use of multiplicity of voices to reduce the necessity of the single authoritative voice. </li></ul><ul><li>The acknowledgement of an institutional point of view rather than assumed objectivity. </li></ul><ul><li>A broadened acknowledgement of other world knowledge systems as valid in addition to scientific thought. </li></ul><ul><li>The inclusion of spirituality and emotion as valid forms of interpretation. </li></ul><ul><li>Experimentation with process as aids to content rather than only verbal explanation. </li></ul><ul><li>Layering of information available for the various levels of learners. </li></ul><ul><li>A tension between celebratory and mea culpa presentations. </li></ul><ul><li>The recognition of contextualization in all forms of museums including art museums. </li></ul>
  5. 5. ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT: Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A much broader range of acceptable sources of income. </li></ul><ul><li>Reliance on private sector funding. </li></ul><ul><li>Project management and accountability. </li></ul><ul><li>Business-like financial administration. </li></ul><ul><li>More competitive salaries and less reliance on class-based volunteerism. </li></ul><ul><li>A changing profile of director to include business people and educators. </li></ul><ul><li>Review of charges and entrance fees. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased interest in front-of-house and customer service as a part of the interpretation mix. </li></ul>
  6. 6. RESEARCH Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>A reduction in research funding but an understanding that some forms of research (i.e. taxonomy of natural history specimens) might be a unique museum-form of research. </li></ul><ul><li>Native knowledge gains some research acceptability. </li></ul><ul><li>An inclusion in the potential economic importance of research in budget planning and the willingness to sell services. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 COLLECTIONS <ul><li>A broadened definition of “real” objects to include photos, movies, reproductions, multiples, etc as authentic objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Technologically based record keeping and the access to information by a much broader public. </li></ul><ul><li>A broadening of acceptable levels of HVAC and other collections standards. </li></ul><ul><li>An inclusion of more natural and more traditional conservation methods. </li></ul><ul><li>An agreement to use collections as participatory objects for ceremonies – the museum as lending library. </li></ul><ul><li>An acceptance of the ceremonial care for objects. </li></ul><ul><li>Repatriation of objects that are grave goods, secret or sacred. </li></ul><ul><li>Changed notions of ownership and authority especially for native material. </li></ul>
  8. 8. FACILITIES Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>The most coveted architectural contract. </li></ul><ul><li>World-class architects and buildings. </li></ul><ul><li>A beginning understanding of the need for contemplative space in the mix. </li></ul><ul><li>The inclusiong of mixed-use space and the broadened associated programs, i.e. cafes. </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion of social, ambulatory and observation spaces. </li></ul><ul><li>Compliance with handicapped accessibility. </li></ul>
  9. 9. MUSEOLOGY Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>Broader interest in learning theory and its applicability. </li></ul><ul><li>For someone rather than about something.* </li></ul><ul><li>“ Steve Weil” wrote some version of this. </li></ul><ul><li>Wider use of audience research and responsiveness. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Education – in addition to class visits Elaine Heumann Gurian 2003 <ul><li>Inclusion of charter schools as part of museum offerings. </li></ul><ul><li>Greater interrelationship with home-schoolers. </li></ul><ul><li>Offering of overnight programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Inclusion as a relevant location for after-school enrichment. </li></ul><ul><li>A wider interest in the novice learner and the family. </li></ul><ul><li>Special pre-school spaces. </li></ul><ul><li>A wider interest in social interaction rather than fact acquisition. </li></ul>
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×