Hiser Usability Presentation Victoria Online Seminar 19 Oct 2009
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Hiser Usability Presentation Victoria Online Seminar 19 Oct 2009

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From here to Usability is a presentation by Greg Ralph, Principal, Hiser Group, 19 October 2009 to the Victoria Online Seminar series.

From here to Usability is a presentation by Greg Ralph, Principal, Hiser Group, 19 October 2009 to the Victoria Online Seminar series.

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Hiser Usability Presentation Victoria Online Seminar 19 Oct 2009 Hiser Usability Presentation Victoria Online Seminar 19 Oct 2009 Document Transcript

  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation From Here to Usability Greg Ralph Principal 19 October 2009 Overview About The Hiser Group Bad designs General introduction to “usability” – What is it? – Why should you care? – How do you get it? Usability strategy – How much does my project need? 90 mins – A few words about “institutionalising” usability (c) The Hiser Group 2009 1
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Who is The Hiser Group? Leaders in user-centred design & education (since 1991) • Usability & customer experience – Over 5,000 sessions for more than 1,800 projects • Breadth of expertise – Across technologies • Websites, intranets, web/desktop applications, kiosks, forms, processes… – Across industries • Public, private & NFP sectors – Around the world • e.g. United Nations, Singapore Polytechnic (c) The Hiser Group 2009 2
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Teaching the industry For more than 15 years Information Architecture – Designing with users 2 days Designing intuitive menus 1 day Learn to design intuitive interfaces collaboratively with users to achieve a Effective menu design to enable your usable system. users to navigate easily and achieve what they came to do. Effective layout and design Writing for the web Usability evaluation 1 day 1 day 2 days Practical techniques to create user-friendly Effectively convey messages Learn quick and inexpensive page and screen designs. to your users – by writing in a methods to test whether your style that suits the online site or application meets the environment. needs of its users. (c) The Hiser Group 2009 3
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation You’ll know when it’s not usable World Usability Day (2006) (c) The Hiser Group 2009 4
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Hallmarks of poor usability (not designed for use in the real world) • Poor task model – What’s the real workflow? – Who’s in control of the interaction? • Clumsy navigation – Can’t find things – Poor orientation • Unclear labels or layout – Confusing, missing or excessive instructions – Not my language • Inconsistent behaviour • Poor feedback or error handling Microsoft standard A more idiosyncratic design warning message (and less predictable to the user) “Yes” saves the document “Yes” loses the document (c) The Hiser Group 2009 5
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation “I just wanted to make the text larger so that the older voters could read it easily” Wikipedia Commons http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Butterfly_Voters_View.jpg (c) The Hiser Group 2009 6
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Atlanta Olympics bomb threat (July 1996) • Call made to 911 “There is a bomb in Centennial Park – you have 30 minutes” • Dispatchers – Couldn’t dispatch till they had an address – Were unable to find Centennial Park’s street address • How many N’s in “Centennial”? • Do I need to add “Park”? • Can the phone number give me the address? • It took 10 minutes to find the address (by ringing the phone number & asking for the address) • Bomb went off 22 minutes after call – 1 killed + dozens injured www.it.bton.ac.uk/staff/lp22/CP303/case/atlanta.html Good interfaces are “invisible” Learnable “walk up and use” Efficient to use “don’t waste my time” Prevent errors & help you recover “don’t lead me into dumb mistakes” User empowerment “make me smart at my job (without slowing me down)” User acceptance & confidence “I’ll be back” (c) The Hiser Group 2009 7
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Why does bad design happen? We will fix it in the next release... Theoretical, untested assumptions Pheasant’s fundamental fallacies (1986) • An ‘average’ user & task structure – Failing to support workflow – Poor allocation of function – “It works for me” – “I think they will want…” • Assumptions of user adaptability – Memory overload – Inconsistency of design Other reasons • Project pressures • Unthinking-ness (c) The Hiser Group 2009 8
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Why should you care? IT value Predicts User understanding & satisfaction Task quality Predicts High ease of use Improved uptake / sales Improved productivity Allianz intranet UCD approach typically increases Over 85% of staff rated it as user productivity by 25% Very Good or Excellent The Gartner Group (1992) (up from 10%) Amex bank authorisation system Wizard, Westpac & GSR websites Task time fell from 17 to 4 minutes Online sales doubled Telstra intranet Productivity targets in 3 months (not 9) Less support needed Melbourne Water approvals Usability principles typically reduces Task time fell from <30 days to 1 day training costs by 25% Landauer (1995) Redesign of insurance system Improved performance Help desk calls dropped by 2/3 NY Stock Exchange Redesign of Macquarie intranet primary trading systems Error rates fell by a factor of 10 Usage Approval Average clicks (despite doubled workloads) Very low 3% 12 Staples.com Very high 96% 3 72% drop in registration drop-outs (c) The Hiser Group 2009 9
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Usage has business implications I haven’t enjoyed trying to find what I wanted to find on this website. It’s just annoying me. I’d probably just go to the next site and have a look at that one – and come back to this one only if I had to. A customer trying to select health insurance Sites lose approx. • 50% potential sales – people can't find what they want • 40% repeat visits – first one was negative experience Repeat customers can spend almost twice as much as new users of an e-commerce site 2006 study confirmed that consumers stop dealings when they have a negative service experience • 80% US • 65% UK Usage has business implications In 2003, an Internet booking cost an airline 50 cents (but $6 through a travel agent or phone operator) Gartner Group estimate: Average call cost is >20 times more expensive than a web self-service enquiry The Net’s supposed to be quick, accessible and very simple – that wasn’t and I was getting grumpy with it. Sooner or later, I would actually stop all this, close it down and ring them up. If customers make one call, they are 90% more likely to make repeat calls This often becomes part of the corporate cost structure (eating away at profit) Over the long term, this is a no-win strategy Mauro (2001) (c) The Hiser Group 2009 10
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation More credible websites It’s usable when it’s “fit for purpose” Donald Norman “The Design of Everyday Things” (c) The Hiser Group 2009 11
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation usable useful engaging effective efficient Users achieve their goals without the tools getting in the way Businesses achieve their desired outcomes Broadening our focus User Experience Honeycomb These approaches are being applied to other things – New technologies – Customer experience – Service design – Process design Peter Morville www.semanticstudios.com/publications/semantics/000029.php (c) The Hiser Group 2009 12
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Some aspects are easier to design • Terminology – “Use my language” • Predictability – Consistent appearance & behaviour – Feedback • Orientation – “Where am I?” – “What can I do here?” • Readable & clear layout Some aspects are harder • Obvious, efficient structure and navigation – Match workflow • Support different user types/needs – Match expectations – Understand their motivation • User control • Subjective user satisfaction – “The user experience” (c) The Hiser Group 2009 13
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation How do you “do” Usability? You are not your user Don’t assume people: • Work like you work • Think like you think • Talk like you talk • Like what you like • Understand the technology • Understand your organisation (c) The Hiser Group 2009 14
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Usability through user-centred design (UCD) • Users’ needs predominantly drive the design – Creates better products – Focus on usage & context – Developers & designers are not suitable user representatives • Empirical and cyclic (iterative) Collaboration & Context Involve Usability as early as possible 80% of software costs occur No . after release (maintenance) es Po ng Al ssi • 80% of that work is due to ha te bl rn e fC unmet / unforeseen at De to ive s user requirements s ig s Co n Requirements Development Deployment Phase Phase Phase $1 $6 – $10 $80 – $100 (c) The Hiser Group 2009 15
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Potential activities Stakeholder workshops Field studies Focus groups Card sorting Scenarios Mock-ups Collaborative design Usability testing Usability goals Set the focus (c) The Hiser Group 2009 16
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Visual design Buttons ‘look like’ buttons Effective & clean layout Users Visual appeal & Branding (fonts, colours, icons, etc.) Business Information design Interaction design Structure of information Navigation & Flow & controls (“information architecture”) Style of ‘conversation’ (“the experience”) Orientation & Feedback Language & Style (labelling; online reading) Creative Commons Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales Call centre system design Not just about the agent Customer Business Agent (c) The Hiser Group 2009 17
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Agent Goals Issues Provide good customer service Cognitive load in high-pressure environment Meet targets for performance Unclear or rigid workflows Design strategies Build workflow into design (support) Provide workflow flexibility Use consistent language In-built coaching Business Goals Issues Reduce cost by 30% Calls take too long to complete Reduce training: 3 weeks to 2 days Agents need significant systems training Capture customer intelligence System doesn’t encourage data capture Design strategies Reduce task time (support workflow & reduce errors) More intuitive screens with in-built coaching Support easy information capture (c) The Hiser Group 2009 18
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Customer Goals Issues Personalised experience “I’ve already explained this!” (remember me) “I’m not being treated like Have confidence in organisation a valued customer” (you know what you’re doing) Call does not flow naturally Design strategies Customer snapshot Flexible workflows Customer-centric view of the world (e.g. time & location) Interaction design to support flow (e-commerce website) (c) The Hiser Group 2009 19
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Activity scenarios Provide the vision for the user experience (and why it’s like that) Card sorting Helps to identify a user-centred information structure (c) The Hiser Group 2009 20
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Information architecture Lateral relationships (structure) (between topics) Commentary & rationale (e.g. changed labels, new content identified by users) © The Hiser Group 2009 Mock-ups (a.k.a. “wireframes”) Make the design “real” (early & cheaply) (c) The Hiser Group 2009 21
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Make sure it works for its intended audience Collaborative design Usability testing Example Hiser style guide © The Hiser Group 2009 (c) The Hiser Group 2009 22
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Example Hiser style guide Select screen controls based on the user’s task © The Hiser Group 2009 Visual design Lead the user through each window or page • Reading & chunking – Group boxes & separators • Placement & spacing – Alignment & designing with grids – Assists with layout – Aids readability • Visual weight (c) The Hiser Group 2009 23
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation How much usability do I need? Do you need lots & lots? (c) The Hiser Group 2009 24
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Not necessarily… Usability will need more attention, the more that… • The system matters to your business • Interactions are complex or new • The user audience is large and/or diverse • Users are outside your organisation Should it be the same for all projects? (c) The Hiser Group 2009 25
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Prioritise projects for Usability input • Apply your resources where you have the greatest need • Integrated & planned for – As early as possible – At key points (based on project need) – Budget set aside • Everyone does at least something – “Some Usability is better than no Usability” – If you can do more, even better! Low-effort usability Medium-effort usability High-effort usability Somewhat important Quite important Mission-critical to the organisation to the organisation Fewer users Lots of users OR Used relatively often OR Less frequently used Very frequently used Some (indirect?) use by Only used by staff Targeted at external users people external to the (who’ll receive training & support) (affects the credibility) organisation (c) The Hiser Group 2009 26
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Low Medium High Planning Analyst Analyst Analyst Analysis Analyst Usability Analyst Usability Analyst Design Developer Usability Usability Construction Testing Developer Usability Usability Deployment Analyst Usability Integration (c) The Hiser Group 2009 27
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation Usability should be strategic (not happenstance) Beware the “Usability police” syndrome! • Usability needs to be seen as helping – Create successful systems – A focus on adoption & outcomes • Facilitators & supporters (with a mandate) – Not the “cop with a truncheon” who beats you up at the gates… (c) The Hiser Group 2009 28
  • From Here to Usability: Victorian Government presentation The Hiser Group 18 / 535 Bourke Street Melbourne Vic 3000 www.hiser.com.au Greg Ralph Jeremy Lewison Principal Consulting Manager (03) 9648 4335 (03) 9648 4323 gregr@hiser.com.au jeremyl@hiser.com.au (c) The Hiser Group 2009 29