So You're Ready to Star on YouTube. Now What?
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A Presentation on Government and Social Media. Presented at the Wisconsin Digital Government Summit, December 1 2009

A Presentation on Government and Social Media. Presented at the Wisconsin Digital Government Summit, December 1 2009

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  • Hi there, <br /> <br /> I&#x2019;m Dan Chapman, Director of Creative Services at RI.gov, the official portal of the State of Rhode Island. RI.gov is maintained by the company I work for, RI Interactive, which is a subsidiary of NIC USA, which provides eGovernment solutions in 23 states.
  • As Dave has just detailed, there are many challenges when looking at social media and it&#x2019;s role in Government.
  • Yet with that, we still have some great opportunities. In many cases, social media sites and services are very eager to get into the Government space. We&#x2019;ve been talking to the team at slideshare for a little while now, and they have been very amenable to changing their TOS in situations where they need to. <br /> <br /> Socrata, a new social data networking site, recently went through an extensive accessibility audit by the GSA to be approved for federal use.
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • Now we have this at our disposal, what do we build? (add animated logos)
  • What often happens, is what I call &#x2018;Man on the Moon&#x2019; syndrome. We step out into a social media space, establish our site there, and say we&#x2019;ve landed, with a great deal of pride.
  • While that&#x2019;s all well and good, it&#x2019;s often of little consequence.
  • What I&#x2019;d like to talk about today, is how we can go beyond good intentions. Being on YouTube because your boss wants you to be on there is great, but do you even have content that works as video?
  • We can be smarter and savvier, fit our content to specific needs. We can use these services to be more open, more transparent, and be focused on content, and on people. <br /> We can do more than just start a Facebook page-- we can really engage our citizens with what we have to offer.
  • I&#x2019;d like to show you three ways you can avoid this (man on the moon syndrome) and instead create effective social media content. <br /> (Perhaps the biggest excuse or concern I come across when helping agencies think about using this technology, is &#x201C;how are we going to have time to do all this?&#x201D; I have a couple of quick examples from the tiny state of Rhode Island that will hopefully show how you can easily create effective social media content) <br /> <br /> Starting some I have a couple of quick examples from the tiny state of Rhode Island that answers the question &#x201C;how are we going to have time?
  • I&#x2019;d like to start with the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. They&#x2019;ve done a fantastic job of using a variety of tools to create an online platform for themselves, using Twitter, RSS, YouTube, Facebook, Myspace and WordPress.
  • The Arts Council needed a way to reach it&#x2019;s audience &#x2013; artists and supports of the arts Why not meet them where they already are? They&#x2019;re already on MySpace, and Facebook promoting what they do.
  • Using social media, the arts council is able to reach constituents where they are, on their terms. <br /> Over 750 &#x201C;fans&#x201D; on Facebook, with no promotion at all.
  • and again, by placing .... content on YouTube, they&#x2019;ve received over 1000 video views with no promotion at all
  • Another agency I&#x2019;ve helped to implement a social media platform is RI DOT. They use social media to reach interested constituents, members of the media, and other invested users with content targeted to fit the medium.
  • DOT on Facebook
  • DOT on Blogger
  • DOT on YouTube
  • How do these state agencies they have time for all of this while still managing their existing workload?
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • - DOT (ALREADY) sends out email alerts for traffic, construction, delays and road closures to an email distribution list (this includes local media outlets). <br /> - Using a free twitter service called TwitterMail, DOT was able to simply add an email address to their email distribution list that then automatically tweeted these same updates <br /> Then Using the RSS feed from Twitter, DOT was able to embed this same data directly on the DOT Web site. <br /> Fitting into an existing workflow, new distribution channels were quickly added
  • Here are those traffic alerts on Twitter.
  • From there, DOT was able to quickly and easily embed that same content on their Web site.
  • (so now instead of the traffic alerts going to their limited email list, updates are available on Twitter for anyone who wants to subscribe to them, and instantly updated on their web site for the public) not doing any more work they are easily and effectively reaches many more constituents)
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • Leveraging the RSS feed generated by their WordPress blog, the Arts council was able to send this RSS feed to a free service called &#x201C;Twitterfeed&#x201D; that would then automatically &#x201C;tweet&#x201D; the RSS feed headlines (on Twitter), complete with a link to the full article hourly. <br /> <br /> Now, content generated from one source could be quickly published in two.
  • One of their primary methods for getting content onto their site is a blog powered by WordPress.
  • Here is that same content, served up on Twitter. <br /> The Arts Council now reaches constituents by Web, RSS and Twitter. <br /> Again, users have choices in how they want to consume this content.
  • Here is that same content, served up on Twitter. <br /> The Arts Council now reaches constituents by Web, RSS and Twitter. <br /> Again, users have choices in how they want to consume this content.
  • I&#x2019;d like to talk a little bit about another social media tool, Flickr which we use at the state portal RI.gov.
  • RI.gov had in the past used a custom built, in house solution, but found it to be time intensive to maintain, host and support. Every month photos would be judged with an in-house voting system, then the winners were notified and sent approval forms for those pictures to be posted to the portal.
  • Why reinvent the wheel when it&#x2019;s already been done? <br /> Key point here, you can reach users passionate about images and photography where they are already congregating.
  • Here are the Flickr photos as seen on RI.gov. Flickr&#x2019;s tools enable us to embed that content in a couple really nice ways
  • At the top, we have a flash-based slideshow
  • Underneath that, image thumbnails provided through the Flickr RSS feed.
  • Here is how those photos appear on the RI.gov Flickr photo page.
  • Some benefits of going with a solution like Flickr: <br /> A legitimate solution already in use by thousands of users worldwide.
  • Other agencies and officials using Flickr in Rhode Island include the Lt. Governor&#x2019;s Office
  • Next up, I&#x2019;d like to talk a little bit about what in means to create an invested audience.
  • Flickr has been embraced by photographers of all kinds that truly care about photography.
  • So, Approvals. <br /> <br /> WIth many of these tools, this (the approval process) is a relatively easy process to set up. With our Flickr group for example, we&#x2019;re able to set up a very quick approval process for all the photos submitted.
  • So, Approvals. <br /> <br /> All photos are approved by hand by an administrator - nothing gets through automatically. <br /> <br /> Any photos can be retroactively removed immediately.
  • Here&#x2019;s a screenshot of the approval process.
  • Reason being, an invested community...
  • With twitter, and many other tools, what people say can be effectively controlled through workflows. In addition, as people are seeking you out in these content areas, they are already by definition interested in what you have to say, and less likely to need constraint.
  • What are the ways we can effectively implement these in a way that gets our message out there as state agencies, and encourages users to become part of the conversation? How does my platform fit my strategy?
  • Our treasury office has done a great job of using a wide range of tools, each targeted for a specific use. In each of these cases, the tool is used only when there is content to warrant its use.
  • Case in point: Treasury &#x2018;tweets&#x2019; the cash flow numbers for the State of Rhode Island every day. Now, anyone already using twitter can keep tabs on the general fund in real time.
  • Here is a treasury blog entry. You can see here it&apos;s used to repost a news article, and allow for comments.
  • Use the right tools for the right job.
  • Empower your citizens to become invested. Small wins like that general fund example give people a window into what&#x2019;s going on in Government in a way that is timely and understandable.
  • SeeClickFix, enables citizens to help each other out in their community. In this example, you can see some bad smelling water was an issue in Connecticut. In this actual example, many other citizens responded about the same issue, and one of them was able to inform the other concerned citizens that the problem was being solved, as he had already spoken to city hall. <br /> <br /> SeeClickFix, is an example of enabling citizens to spread your message for you. In this case, social media empowers them to become part of the solution, part of your eyes and ears on the ground.
  • Two way dialogue creates a more invested citizenry, and a more open, engaged government process.
  • Many companies are using two way communication to great effect on Twitter. Listening to what users are already saying about them, and responding to direct, individual requests. This is a question my wife posed to our local Whole Foods super market about gluten free pie crusts for her father.
  • Less than 24 hours later, a helpful reply came. Personal, to the point, helping create fantastic customer service and loyalty.
  • Other Examples of companies doing the same thing: Jet Blue
  • H and R Block actually offers free tax advice over Twitter.
  • One last example I&#x2019;d like to talk about is UserVoice. For those of you who might not have run across it yet, UserVoice is a great tool for soliciting and ranking ideas. Essentially, you can submit an idea to make something better, then other users can vote on that idea and increase it&#x2019;s ranking. The best ideas bubble up to the top.
  • Again, the General Treasurer is expanding their platform further with a UserVoice powered site called &#x201C;Plan for Rhode Island&#x201D; to solicit ideas to improve Rhode Island&#x2019;s economy - which now has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. <br /> <br /> It&#x2019;s been a huge hit already. In the two weeks since launch, it has received over 2,500 visits, with over 222 voters and 71 active ideas (121 submitted).
  • UserVoice is being embraced by many Government entities, from FEMA
  • to the City of Santa Cruz who actually used it to solicit feedback on their upcoming budget.
  • Two-way dialogue makes for very happy customers. While the citizen to government relationship is different from the traditional business / customer relationship, I think there are many tricks that work in the business sector that can be applied to Government. In both cases, it&#x2019;s really ultimately about people.
  • Social Media Strategy. We have to create services that are fair to those with the burden of maintaining this content, that fits within existing policies, and is flexible enough to change and change rapidly.
  • Strategy to policy. Here is a sample social media policy from Mashable.com. This policy, from an actual company has some great examples of how we can and I think should engage people online.
  • Some parting thoughts -- I think it&#x2019;s important to try small experiments. Start small, perhaps even with a personal account, before going for the big show-stopping social media platform. Build slowly, and build a good audience for your content, and see where it takes you.
  • Ultimately, you should use social media to reach people on more than just a web site. We have the tools at our disposal to reach audiences in ways that didn&#x2019;t exist just a few years ago. <br /> <br /> With the right strategy, we can make our online presence more about a Web site and make social media about one thing: people.

So You're Ready to Star on YouTube. Now What? Presentation Transcript

  • 1. You’re Ready to Star on YouTube Now What? Dan Chapman, Director of Creative Services, RI.gov / NIC USA
  • 2. Challenges • In-house security concerns • User privacy • Appropriate use? • Reliability? • Commercial Sites?
  • 3. Yet, Opportunities Terms of Service can be changed, adapted for Government use. Internal Policies can be adapted.
  • 4. So you’re Ready. Now What?
  • 5. Now What? What to we do with all this stuff?
  • 6. Now What? What to we do with all this stuff?
  • 7. Good intentions. Little consequence.
  • 8. Letʼs think beyond good intentions.
  • 9. No More ‘Man on the Moon’ • Target content to fit an information need. • Open, transparent, two-way conversations. • Focus on content & people.
  • 10. But I Don’t Have time! Workflow Examples from the tiny State of Rhode Island 1
  • 11. RI State Arts Council • Twitter • RSS • YouTube • Facebook • MySpace • WordPress
  • 12. RI Department of Transportation
  • 13. Workflow (Why you have time)
  • 14. RI Department of Transportation
  • 15. RI Department of Transportation
  • 16. RI Department of Transportation
  • 17. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 18. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 19. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 20. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 21. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 22. RI Department of Transportation Twitter
  • 23. RI State Council on the Arts
  • 24. RI State Council on the Arts RSS
  • 25. RI State Council on the Arts RSS
  • 26. RI State Council on the Arts RSS Twitterfeed
  • 27. RI State Council on the Arts RSS Twitterfeed
  • 28. RI State Council on the Arts RSS Twitterfeed Twitter
  • 29. RI State Council on the Arts RSS Twitterfeed Twitter
  • 30. RI State Council on the Arts RSS Twitterfeed Twitter
  • 31. Photography Workflow at RI.gov
  • 32. In-house Workflow • In-house photo contest application • Custom built, hosted and maintained by portal staff • Very Time-intensive
  • 33. Enter Flickr • Huge collective user value • 3 billion photos, 30 million visitors per month • Conversational, real-time
  • 34. Enter Flickr • RI.gov Flickr Photo Pool • www.ri.gov/photos/ • Launched Summer 2008 • Over 1,200 fantastic photos submitted & approved
  • 35. Benefits • Legitimacy from a trusted destination • Pre-built approval process • API • Web-based • Hosting • Invested community
  • 36. Cultivating an 2 Invested Audience
  • 37. What People say on Flickr • Embraced by photographers, professional and amateur worldwide • A trusted destination for people that care about photography
  • 38. What about Moderation? Arenʼt you afraid of what people will say?
  • 39. Approval Process • All photos approved by an account administrator • Any photos can be retroactively removed • Over 1,200 fantastic photos submitted & approved
  • 40. Invested Community The total number of photos rejected due to objectionable content: 0 Why? An Invested community.
  • 41. Other Examples Twitter Replies are only seen by default by users that subscribe to both the account being replied to, and the person sending the reply. (Conversation loop) Blogs Fantastic moderation tools are built-in to all major blogging tools.
  • 42. Social Media Strategy 3
  • 43. Case Study: RI Treasury • WordPress for blog content • Flickr for photos of events • RSS for news / blog entries • YouTube for video announcements • Twitter for General Fund Expenditures
  • 44. Use the right tools where appropriate.
  • 45. Empower your Citizens to become invested.
  • 46. Create two-way dialogue That is productive, open and respectful.
  • 47. UserVoice Two-way communication in action
  • 48. Social Media Strategy • Fits with your existing policies • Uses the right tool for the job • Creates two-way dialogue • Sustainable & Flexible
  • 49. Strategy to Policy • You have the power to: • Engage customers in conversations where they are happening. Youʼre representing us and weʼre trusting you. Act Accordingly. • Word of mouth is extremely important to us. If you can make the experience better than expected, do it. • Above all, our communications with people should be honest and fair. Never post anything you would be afraid for your mom to see. Source: http://mashable.com/2009/06/02/social-media-policy-musts/
  • 50. Start Small Create small experiments
  • 51. Social Media is about people.
  • 52. Thank you. Questions? dchapman@nicusa.com @dannychapman www.ri.gov/about/staff.php Credits http://www.flickr.com/photos/78364563@N00/34575328/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/3746737855/ Special Thanks Ulana Chapman Hillary Hartley Kellie Benoit