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MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides
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MSU Strategic Doing Detroit Workshop Slides

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Introductory slides to a Strategic Doing workshop at Michigan State designed to get tighter alignment and leverage from the university's Detroit-based initiatives.

Introductory slides to a Strategic Doing workshop at Michigan State designed to get tighter alignment and leverage from the university's Detroit-based initiatives.

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  • In this first section we recognize that our world––our economy, our communities––are really composed of networks. This is a bit of a departure from old ways of thinking. Learning about networks is a little like putting on a new set of glasses. It takes some getting used to. But after a while we learn that we can see more clearly.
  • In our old approach strategy––strategic planning––a small group of leaders did all the thinking, while the rest of us did all the doing. This approach may work well in a hierarchical organization, like a large corporation, where there are clear lines of authority. It does not work well on our communities and regions. Our communities and regions are made up of networks. In networks, there is no hierarchy. No one can tell anybody else what to do. As a consequence, we need to come up with a new approach in order to design and implement strategy in today's economy. There’s one other problem. Nobody has enough time. So we would be better off if we could figure out a way to design and implement our strategies to collaborate that did not take too much time.
  • What is the grand vision for the Foundation’s future? How can it better support the University? In this day and age, UWM does not expect to build the critical infrastructure to become a world-class research university the way it was done in Madison. It cannot rely almost exclusively on the State to grow its academic and research enterprise. At UWM we need to create a public/private infrastructure that leverages the best of both worlds. At the Foundation, we have an opportunity to: [read slide] This is a bold vision. It is different from what we have done in the past. It will not be easy, but it is possible. And it is the only way the campus will realistically be able to reach its goals in the long term.
  • In this first section we recognize that our world––our economy, our communities––are really composed of networks. This is a bit of a departure from old ways of thinking. Learning about networks is a little like putting on a new set of glasses. It takes some getting used to. But after a while we learn that we can see more clearly.
  • In this first section we recognize that our world––our economy, our communities––are really composed of networks. This is a bit of a departure from old ways of thinking. Learning about networks is a little like putting on a new set of glasses. It takes some getting used to. But after a while we learn that we can see more clearly.
  • Strategic Doing involves asking and answering four questions. These questions seem him on the surface, to be very simple. In reality, the questions encourage us to think much more deeply about where we're going and how we will get there. These four questions guide deeper, focused conversations. We will look at each of these questions in more depth. The important point is that Strategic Doing involves answering all four questions every time we meet. It is a cycle that we repeat. As we learn more, we become more skilled at answering these questions. The process goes faster each time we go through it.
  • The first question of Strategic Doing is “What could we do together?” to answer this question we need to learn from each other what we are willing to share. In other words, we need to start with our assets. These assets can be tangible––such things as physical locations, our contacts or money––or they can be intangible: things we care about, our experience. In this first step we need to learn to interview each other and ask questions. We need to listen and look for patterns and possible connections. In other words, it is not enough simply to list our assets. We need to look for connections. As we look for these connections and find them, we define some new opportunities. So, for example, we may find that the librarian is interested and willing to help the workforce development professional provide guidance for recently laid-off workers. In this way the resources of the library can be made available to the public workforce system more easily. The point is, we will not find opportunities until we learn from each other what we have to share. That is the first step in Strategic Doing.
  • The second step in Strategic Doing involves converting at least one opportunity into a very clear, shared outcome. This step requires us to think much more concretely about the outcome that we would like to see. We need to describe this outcome in very clear terms, in order 1) to agree on what success looks like and 2) to motivate people to follow us. Remember, we cannot “command and control” people into action. They will only move in a direction, if they can emotionally engage with where we are going. We need to describe our destination in very practical and clear terms. The people we are trying to motivate are very practical. They will only move in a new direction, if they can see the outcome clearly in their minds. In addition, by describing our outcome clearly, we find ways to measure it. Indeed, chances are that if we come up with a description that we cannot measure, it is probably too vague to motivate people. Chances are, we have not come to a clear agreement on what success looks like.
  • Next, we need to define a project and an action plan. In other words, we need to define how we're going to get to our outcome. We have an understandable tendency to come up with good ideas for other people to do. This is one of the reasons why strategies are so difficult to implement. If we have a lot of people telling only a handful of people what to do, chances are nothing gets done. On the other hand, if we all take small steps in the same direction, we can collectively take big steps. So the third question of Strategic Doing, “What will we do together?”, Is designed to develop a clear project and an action plan in which people share a commitment to get something done.
  • The last step of Strategic Doing is easy to miss, but it is vitally important. We need to commit to come back together again to revise our strategy and figure out what works. In addition, we can spot new opportunities and make decisions to move in a new direction, if that makes sense. In other words, by committing to come back together again, we are committing to learn together. We are opening the opportunity that we can be flexible and adapt to new circumstances. This commitment, though seemingly simple, is vitally important to designing and implementing a strategy. In our world, change is constant, but progress is not a given. In order to progress, we need to share what we are learning with each other and continue down the road toward a more prosperous future. In other words, our progress depends on our commitment to each other.
  • Transcript

    • 1. MSU Workshop Detroit Detroit <ul><li>Ed Morrison </li></ul><ul><li>Purdue Center for Regional Development </li></ul><ul><li>April 14, 2011 </li></ul>
    • 2. The material is copyright, 2011, Ed Morrison. It is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 unported license. You are free to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt this material with the understanding that that you attribute the source as follows: &quot;Source: Ed Morrison&quot; For any reuse or distribution, you must make clear to others the license terms of this work. The best way to do this is with a link to this web page: http://http :// http://crea tivecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
    • 3. <ul><li>Our Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Framing the Detroit’s transformation </li></ul><ul><li>Doing Strategic Doing </li></ul>
    • 4. Our challenges: Link and leverage resources across organizational and political boundaries Develop coherence to explain how MSU engages with Detroit Build sophisticated collaborations quickly
    • 5. Our outcomes for today: Promising collaborations among MSU initiatives A new narrative to explain how MSU engages with Detroit New skills in building collaborations with Strategic Doing
    • 6. Why Strategic Doing? We live in a world of networks.
    • 7. But we grew up in a world of hierarchies and boundaries... Counties Cities and Towns Federal Agencies State Agencies K-12 Schools Higher Education Institutions Workforce Boards Social Service Organizations Chambers of Commerce Economic Development Organizations Foundations Regional Planning Organizations
    • 8. We need a fast, strategic way to build collaborations across invisible fences...
    • 9. As networks get thicker, opportunities expand...
    • 10. Link and leverage strategies produce “swarm innovation”
    • 11. Purdue and its partners redesigned a regional workforce system using this approach to achieve major productivity gains Completed Training Degrees and Certificates Awarded
    • 12. © 2008, Brian D. Thompson, UWM Research Foundation 10/6/08 Funding Agencies Academic Institutions Private Sector Public Sector Milwaukee 7 Water Cluster Opportunities Funds Fluid Transport/ Civil & Ind. Engr. Detection Materials Bioscience Pumps/ Valves/ Components Analysis/ Measuring/ Control Water User Consumer Products Treatment/ Processing/ Softening Utilities DOE EPA NSF USDA DoD NOAA/DOC Interior World Bank Foundations International Partners NIH Greater Milwaukee Foundation UWM Marquette UW-Madison WATER Inst. Chem & Biosci School of Freshwater Science CEAS Physics MSOE Fluid Power Rapid Proto Center M7/GMC MMSD City of Milwaukee DNR UNDP Federal Government Municipalities Water Council Pentair <ul><li>Filtering & purification </li></ul>GE Badger Meter <ul><li>Water meters </li></ul><ul><li>Meter reading systems </li></ul>Procorp <ul><li>Water reuse & softening </li></ul><ul><li>Phosphate & radium removal </li></ul>AO Smith <ul><li>Water heaters </li></ul>Kohler <ul><li>Faucets </li></ul><ul><li>Materials, coatings, plating </li></ul><ul><li>Casting technology </li></ul>Miller Coors <ul><li>Intake quality, output quality </li></ul><ul><li>Energy consumption </li></ul>AquaSensors Thermo Fisher Scientific Fall River Great Lakes Water <ul><li>Water treatment equipment </li></ul>Advanced Chemical Systems <ul><li>Ind. wastewater treatment </li></ul>CH2MHILL <ul><li>Engineering services </li></ul>ITT Sanitarie <ul><li>Wastewater treatment design </li></ul>Flygt <ul><li>pumps </li></ul>Siemens Joy Bucyrus Veolia <ul><li>Water utilities </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental </li></ul><ul><li>Algae control (& exploitation) </li></ul><ul><li>Removal of PCBs from lakes & rivers </li></ul><ul><li>Storm water containment, </li></ul><ul><li>Road salt </li></ul><ul><li>Ship’s ballast – policy/enforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Aquaculture </li></ul><ul><li>Lake Michigan contamination </li></ul><ul><li>Policy issues – metering/incentives </li></ul><ul><li>Energy/Efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Ethanol production efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Tar sands water treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Elimination of boiler scaling </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing brewing efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Increased efficiency of water heating </li></ul><ul><li>Speeding treatment for large volumes </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing treatment efficiency </li></ul>Processing/Treatment <ul><li>Municipal wastewater treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Storm water treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced use of chemicals </li></ul><ul><li>Industrial wastewater treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Farm manure, food processing waste, metals </li></ul><ul><li>Utilizing sewer sludge </li></ul><ul><li>Residential Water Treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Residential water treatment, home filtration </li></ul><ul><li>Residential Water softening without salt </li></ul><ul><li>Reverse Osmosis </li></ul><ul><li>Softening </li></ul><ul><li>Ships ballast - treatment </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment targets </li></ul><ul><li>PCBs in sewer pieps </li></ul><ul><li>Desalinzation </li></ul><ul><li>Radium in ground water </li></ul><ul><li>Pharmaceuticals </li></ul><ul><li>Phosphate </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring/Detection </li></ul><ul><li>Water security </li></ul><ul><li>Real time monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>User detection systems </li></ul><ul><li>Real time sensing for life forms </li></ul><ul><li>Pharmaceuticals </li></ul><ul><li>Joe Aldstadt – analytical methods </li></ul><ul><li>Peter Geissinger – detection </li></ul><ul><li>Alan Schwabacher– pharmaceuticals in water </li></ul><ul><li>Carmen Aguilar – microbiology </li></ul><ul><li>David Petering –metal metabolism </li></ul><ul><li>Val Klump </li></ul><ul><li>Rohatgi, Pradeep – adv. castings, lightweight, lead-free </li></ul><ul><li>Aita, Carolyn – advanced coatings </li></ul><ul><li>Gong, Sarah – polymer materials </li></ul><ul><li>Chen, Junhong – nano materials, sensors </li></ul><ul><li>Li, Jin – pollutant transport modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Bravo, Hector – hydraulic modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Christensen, Erik – pollutants in water </li></ul><ul><li>Amano, Ryoichi - CFD </li></ul><ul><li>Pillia, Krisna – porous media modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Kevin Renken- mass transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Sobolvev – biproducts utilization </li></ul><ul><li>Doug Cherkauer – groundwater hydrology </li></ul><ul><li>Jim Waples – water aging </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Consi – aquatic robots </li></ul><ul><li>Tom Grundle - harbors </li></ul><ul><li>Tim Ehlinger – aquatic systems </li></ul><ul><li>Burlage – PCR environmental test </li></ul><ul><li>Shangping Xu – safe drinking water </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships </li></ul><ul><li>Sponsored Research Proj. </li></ul><ul><li>Shared equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Graduates </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce training </li></ul><ul><li>Subcontractor/supplier </li></ul><ul><li>Extramural grant support </li></ul><ul><li>Philanthropic support </li></ul><ul><li>Cluster Effects </li></ul><ul><li>Shared resources/equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative grants </li></ul><ul><li>Improved competitiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Translational science </li></ul>
    • 13. Civic leaders all over the country are recognizing the value of thinking differently about strategy
    • 14. <ul><li>Our Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Framing the Detroit’s transformation </li></ul><ul><li>Doing Strategic Doing </li></ul>
    • 15. Detroit’s challenge and the Great Lakes Nation “ ...schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.”
    • 16. Our grandfathers created wealth by building large, globally competitive, hierarchical organizations capable of moving a lot of stuff... Hulett ore unloaders, Cleveland Automobile assembly line, Detroit Early Westinghouse assembly line, Pittsburgh
    • 17. Here’s what’s happening...Our Grandfather’s economy hit the top of its S-Curve in the 1970s
    • 18. Beginning in the 1980’s a new S-Curve began to form, based on networked business models
    • 19. We are now in the midst of this fundamental shift and it’s continuing to gain momentum...
    • 20. Transforming economies involves connecting assets for our Grandfather’s economy to opportunities in our Grandchildren’s economy...
    • 21. Transformation in Detroit and the Great Lakes will emerge from networks in five different areas....
    • 22. <ul><li>Our Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Framing the Detroit’s transformation </li></ul><ul><li>Doing Strategic Doing </li></ul>
    • 23. Strategy is not longer “Set it and forget it”.... Strategy is now a dynamic process of adaptation, like paddling a kayak in the ocean
    • 24. Adaptive strategy requires continuous, fast assessments and re-alignments
    • 25.  
    • 26. Strategic Doing involves answering four simple, but not easy questions...
    • 27. Opportunities emerge when we connect our assets...
    • 28. Next, we convert opportunities into a measurable outcome…What “success” looks like
    • 29. We need to define what we will do together...What is one project that will move us to our shared outcome?
    • 30. Finally, we need to define the details for getting back together
    • 31.  
    • 32. Master Strategic Doing Pack: Michigan State 2 The first step in a Strategic Doing workshop involves capturing the names and contact information of all the people involved in building a new network. Please pass around this Master Pack, so that everyone can sign their name. Ed Morrison at the Purdue Center for Regional Development prepared this Strategic Doing Pack for a workshop at Michigan State University in East Lansing on April 14, 2011. Please contact Peggy Hosea at Purdue for more information: [email_address] . Focus area.-- Our conversation is focused on: This Master Pack is completed by: Name Organization e-mail
    • 33. Strategic Doing Question 1: What could we do together? Identify the assets you are willing to share...Then connect them to define new opportunities What assets are we willing to share to help each other in our work in Detroit? Assets can be tangible (places to meet, money, Internet resources, and so on) or intangible (knowledge, experience, networks, passions). Here, you want to focus your conversation on what you are doing in Detroit and what you can possibly share. Listen carefully for how we might build connections among these assets. Focus your comments to make sure there is enough time. Examples: Bill K -- Focus on at-risk youth. Jane S -- Deep understanding of literacy. Susan D. -- Specialist in early child care.
    • 34. Strategic Doing Question 1: What could we do together? Identify the assets you are willing to share...Then connect them to define new opportunities Now it is time to explore how we could uncover some new opportunities when we connect our assets. Here we create new opportunities by connecting our assets. As we connect more assets to an opportunity, the opportunity becomes clearer, more focused and stronger. In the spaces below, outline some opportunities where you can “link and leverage” the assets around the table. Be quick. Just jot down your ideas. Example of an opportunity connecting these assets: Examples: Bill K -- Focus on at-risk youth. Jane S -- Deep understanding of literacy. Susan D. -- Specialist in early child care. Opportunity: “Develop a ‘cradle-to-career’ youth support network similar to Strive in Cincinnati.” Opportunity 1: Opportunity 2: Opportunity 3:
    • 35. Strategic Doing Question 2: What should we do together? Convert opportunities into outcomes with specific characteristics Our Opportunity: What metrics could you use to measure your success? Characteristic 1: Metric 1 Characteristic 2: Metric 2 Characteristic 3: Metric 3 The first step in converting an opportunity into an outcome is to describe what success might look like. We are trying to describe a complex future, so there will be a number of characteristics. One way to get at this is to ask yourself, “If we are successful, what will people experience that is different?” To illustrate, we will continue our example of a youth support network. Our Opportunity: Create a ‘cradle-to-career’ youth support network similar to Strive in Cincinnati. What metrics could you use to measure your success? Hint: If you cannot figure out how to measure your characteristic, it is too vague to be useful. Characteristic 1: A site visit to Cincinnati followed by representative coming to Detroit Metric 1: Report of site visit Characteristic 2: Regional asset map of youth support activities (version 1.0) Metric 2: Number of nodes Characteristic 3: An semi-annual gathering to develop and guide new network Metric 3: Strategy from gathering
    • 36. Strategic Doing Question 3: What will we do together? Move toward your outcome with at least one project Name one project that will start moving you toward your outcome. What could you start doing tomorrow? Our project is: Conducting research on urban gardening and conducing a forum at MSU on strategies You can give your project more credibility with some milestones Milestone 1: By July, we will complete our site visit Milestone 2: By August, we will pool our information to complete initial asset map Milestone 3: By September, we will organize an initial gathering for October Name one project that will start moving you toward your outcome. What could you start doing tomorrow? Our project is: Mark your path forward with some milestones Milestone 1: By ____________________, we will ____________________________________________________ Milestone 2: By ____________________, we will ____________________________________________________ Milestone 3: By ____________________, we will ____________________________________________________
    • 37. Strategic Doing Question 3: What will we do together? Draft a quick action plan Draft a quick action plan in which everyone commits to taking one step to move the project along: Who Action Step By When Bill K Develop on-site location to pool information June 15 Susan D Organize initial core team meeting June 15 Our Action Plan Who Action Step By When
    • 38. Strategic Doing Question 4: When will we get back together? Make a commitment to reconnect and revise Maintaining alignments and connections is a dynamic process requiring continuous (but not constant) attention. Small amounts of time (1-2 hours per month) can be devoted to revising our strategy. The point is to come back together share what we have learned, re-align ourselves, and figure out our next steps. Follow-up Meeting Date June 1 Time 2:00PM Place Conference call: Susan will arrange Internet Details How will you use the Internet to stay connected? We’ll use e-mail for now. Might focus on a group blog. Bill will explore. Follow-up Meeting Date Time Place Internet Details How will you use the Internet to stay connected?
    • 39.  

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