Introduction to Bonsai
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Introduction to Bonsai

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    Introduction to Bonsai Introduction to Bonsai Presentation Transcript

    • Tennessee ValleyBonsai SocietyAn Introductionto Bonsai
    • Bonsai “Bone-sigh” A tree in a tray A plant in a pot A perspective Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Bonsai Historical origins Characteristics Species Size Style Desirable elements Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Bonsai Historical origins China Japan Western world Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • China Pre-1100 First evidence on paintings Landscapes Individual plants Collected Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Japan 1185–1333 Zen Buddhism Originally collected from wild Singular trees Later cultivated Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Western World First observed with opening of Japan Emperor gift to President Lincoln Popularized at Chicago Exposition in 1898 and Paris world exhibition in 1900 Not so popular during WWII Now very popular Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Species Evergreen Deciduous Tropical Any plant with a woody trunk Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Sizes of TreeMame (one hand): up to 6”Chumono (two hands): up to 24”Dai (four hands): up to 48” Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Styles of Tree Formal upright Informal upright Slanting Semi-cascade Cascade Broom Literati Windswept Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Formal Upright The formal upright style has a straight, erect trunk from base to apex. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Informal Upright The informal upright style has a curved trunk with the apex over the base. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Slanting The slanting style has either a straight or curved trunk leaning to the left or to the right with the apex generally above the rim of the container. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Semi-cascade The semi-cascade style has a trunk which grows up and out at a considerable angle, with the tip of the cascade between the rim and the feet of the container. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Cascade The cascade style bonsai has a trunk which bends sharply down, and the tip of the cascade is below the feet of the container. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • BroomThe broom style hasa straight, short trunklooking like an upsidedown broom. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Literati The literati style looks like the stylized trees in some Chinese paintings or Japanese woodblock prints.They have slender and strangely bent trunks with sparse foliage. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Windswept The windswept bonsai style has most of its limbs slanting in the same direction. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Formal Upright Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Informal Upright Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Slanted Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Semi-cascade Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Cascade Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Broom Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Literati Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Windswept Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Desirable Elements Roots Branches Trunk Leaf structure Longevity Container Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Bonsai An art form Michelangelo: Look for the statue within the stone, and remove that which is extraneous. Bonsaist: Look for the tree within the tree, and remove that which is extraneous. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)
    • Let us begin. Tennessee Valley Bonsai Society (3/2011)