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The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
The ROI of User Experience
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The ROI of User Experience

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In "The ROI of User Experience: From Strategy and Conception to Development and Execution," …

In "The ROI of User Experience: From Strategy and Conception to Development and Execution,"
EffectiveUI President Anthony Franco demonstrates why companies need to invest in user experience and user experience research, and how to optimize and measure UX ROI.

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  • 1. #effec%veuiThe ROI of User Experience From Strategy and Conception to Development and ExecutionAnthony Franco twitter.com/anthonyfrancoPresident, EffectiveUI anthonyfranco.wordpress.com
  • 2. question:what do these 3 very successful products have in common?
  • 3. answer:they all found aHUGE female audience
  • 4. answer:they all found aHUGE female audience accidentally
  • 5. Investing in userexperience gives you the opportunity togain wide adoption... deliberately!
  • 6. INVEST INGOOD USEREXPERIENCE
  • 7. There is only one true measure for successfuluser experiences...
  • 8. ROI
  • 9. The mainingredient forsolution ROI...
  • 10. User Adoption
  • 11. user adoption = ROI customer self service x user adoption = ROI employee data entry x user adoption = ROI content participation x user adoption = ROIuser generated content x user adoption = ROI process automation x user adoption = ROI
  • 12. investing in a Good User Experience is simply hyper focusing onUser Adoption
  • 13. IBM “Cost-Justifying Ease of Use” “Every $1 invested in usability returnsbetween $10 and $100”
  • 14. IBM’s Lotus Notes
  • 15. most technology solutions produce these results
  • 16. what if we re-defined success by delighting users?
  • 17. HOW? (the laws of creatingeffective user experiences)
  • 18. what was common about the successes?
  • 19. Law:FOCUS ON THE USER FIRST
  • 20. ✓focus on the end user first by: understanding user goals and needs before deciding on the user flow
  • 21. stakeholders defined this user flow PICK HOW YOU OPEN AN STORE CREDIT CLICK EMAIL SHIP WILL PAY CARD INFORMATION WAIT FOR EMAIL TO CONFIRM ACCOUNT Now? I just want to ship something. LOGIN PACKAGE, CHOOSE CHECK PRICE/ DETAILED TO & FROM CONFIRM TRACK SERVICE PAY DESCRIPTIONI don’t know how What doesto answer that. each cost?
  • 22. what theirUSERS WANT THIS: customers actually needed: PACKAGE, COST VS. CONFIRM SHIP TO & FROM TIME DECISION PAY & TRACK this is what users wanted
  • 23. ✓focus on the end user first by: conducting good research and iterating with prototypes
  • 24. avoid: building large user research documents
  • 25. fewer research interpretations are betterquality of user research number of interpretations the fidelity of research deliverables
  • 26. Law:I.T. PROBABLY DOES NOT UNDERSTAND YOUR CUSTOMERS
  • 27. baduigallery.comhow did this happen?
  • 28. “Software today isdesigned for the people who are building it”
  • 29. this is typically how I.T. sees your customers
  • 30. ABC CORP SYSTEMARCHITECTURETRANSACTION CITIZEN DATA SERVER LEGACY BPM AUTOMATION CMS FRAMEWORK project teams minimize the user 3rd PARTY 3rd PARTY WORKFLOW CONTENT in almost every process SOA SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION UI and this is where they put them
  • 31. avoid:allowing I.T. to make uninformed userexperience decisions
  • 32. avoid: Allowing I.T. to offshore your interface design or architecture
  • 33. Law:USERS DON’T KNOW HOW TO BUILD REQUIREMENTS
  • 34. You need to interpretwhat your users ask for
  • 35. - Henry Ford If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses.’
  • 36. “where’s the refresh button?” joe user
  • 37. Law:VALUE GOOD DESIGN
  • 38. Give me 5 features that made you upgrade youroperating system
  • 39. Adobe Watson Express
  • 40. avoid: Asking for the “big pitch”
  • 41. Law: PLAY CHESSNOT CHECKERS
  • 42. does anyone here think this is possible? “In less than 8 weeks we created a game-changing customer experience”
  • 43. UX
  • 44. Revolution Innovation organizational Evolution technology ecosystem Mobile delivery Web channel DesktopUX Device
  • 45. business cultural trends economic markets connectivity legal language localityUX accessibility technology
  • 46. say socialize collaborate behaviors make do want need see touch sensesUX feel hear
  • 47. IBM “Cost-Justifying Ease of Use” “Every $1 invested in usability returnsbetween $10 and $100”
  • 48. most companies are spending money fixinginnovation user adoption issues rather than doing the less costly work of strategically forecasting user needs 20% 80% maintenance Pressman, 1992 80% of development are maintenance costs
  • 49. ✓play chess by: Taking the time for strategic research combined with iterative validation
  • 50. Law: DO NOT TRYTO DESIGN FOR EVERYONE
  • 51. If you attempt todesign for everybody, you wind up building for nobody
  • 52. this is the result of building for everyone
  • 53. ✓do not build for everyone: Contextualize how you think about your users by defining a small set of user types (a maximum of 3 is best)
  • 54. avoid: “Fewer features”
  • 55. from: Joel Spolsky’s topic, It’s Not That Hard”an example of “feature” thinking
  • 56. from: Joel Spolsky’s topic, It’s Not That Hard”an example of “end user” thinking
  • 57. Law:RIGID PLANS ARE PLANS TO FAIL
  • 58. “Software projects arepredictably unpredictable”
  • 59. process diagrams are a dime a dozen
  • 60. avoid: you can’t schedule innovation like this
  • 61. On Time On Budget No Hard Conversations(who cares if anyone is using it)rigid plans attempt to produce these results
  • 62. ✓projects are unpredictable because: SCOPE = PRODUCT
  • 63. Law:EVERY PRODUCTNEEDS A SINGLE VISION
  • 64. ProductExecutive Designer Developer Manager
  • 65. ProductExecutive Designer Developer Manager
  • 66. define success and build consensus
  • 67. understandthe end user
  • 68. contextual research
  • 69. Context Scenarios Logs in to the console Monitors network feeds Sets advanced lters Establishes rules Receives an alert Drills down to problem area Discovers and attack Quarantines a ected area James Woo Context Scenarios Logs in to the consolePower User Primary Persona Reviews Network Activity Sets New RulesJames is an IT administrator for an internal network of a 3000 employee corporation. He ison call 24-7 and is responsible for maintaining a very complex, multi-tiered environment,from high-pro le servers to employee computers.Being able to put his nger to the “pulse of the network”, maintain ne-grain control oftra c and maintain a high level of security is what James relies on. There are gigabits ofactivity happening every hour that he must be able to respond to at a moments notice. Marian PhillipsWhen James logs in to the application he is able to maintain an overview of his network. Novice User Secondary PersonaHe knows the network inside and out and has customized his “workspace” to cater to the Context Scenarios Logs in to the consolemost critical areas. Glances at Dashboard Marian is IT support for a 200 employee company. She monitors the network, but also Evaluates network “saves” helps with employee hardware and software. The rst order of business for Marian is checking email, voice messages and the current status of the network. She receives an email stating that employees are no longer allowed to browse YouTube.com. In addition to monitoring the network, Marian can perform a couple easy steps to creating a rule to block employees from browsing to YouTube.com. Sure, Marian can view every Clark McCarthy network activity, but her primary concern is responding to the immediate demands of enforcing company policies. Executive User Secondary Persona Context Scenarios Demonstrates the application Drills into speci c features Clark is CTO for a 3000 employee company and reports directly to board members. He likes to keep tabs on the companies network response and e ectiveness to see if spending all that money on new servers is really paying o . Steve wants an easy-to-use dashboard that allows him to monitor just how great his Newstead George network is running. It also doesn’t hurt that he has high level information he can use to get get praise from the boss. TriGeo Executive George is looking for a product that can be white labeled and headed on the path to a SaaS o ering while delivered on time and with required functionality. Context Scenarios Gives a demo Navigates through features Linda Deris TriGeo Employee Linda is focused on selling TriGeo o erings. She wants something easy to demo and sell while successfully conveying the value, ease and power of the application.user archetypes
  • 70. Gwen’s Customer Journey Gwen is moving her family of three. She knows she’s going to need phone and internet service. The affective and contextual factors that will affect Gwen’s choice in telecom vendors are price, her existing knowledge and previous experience. ? nt fro e. . up ? . . n od ns lo h. h ed ue as e. ? go ea is a rc fo uc t g . va dg va xp o k ight ea in n’t m th e. m i nc wle is . s ar h o ct ar e r ou le to be th do ce r uc s a no do ? ew t l go g. at e to vi m ay be y es in en ht m gu o ad p tim so ice tt ov h l g to yv n e w ab ni ice ie es ice e m er i e d ve rv n ee tio . ur be e v sa e dd em er M e go as ys er tim ha e’r s ed i yn es lla itt h u fin th se en to er ss W e. yb re io n ce th e eI ll m th t a lo ev ing ns lin ow cis m wi Pr em d ro e’s eI ’s a do vi t o ul co on p ed no t g e p n r re em us ho s I’v hy he he re d is w go e l yp m na ’m No I’ll It’s Ho ed e & Is Th Th el Th I us W t W W I’ll tio d tra wh ite xio ra us er xc pi An Fr Ov E AsThoughts& Feelings Calls to order serviceEmotional Emotion throughout journey Goes online and checks out different optionsExperience Emotion towards -------- Consults with influencer I can’t afford what I’m finding here. On hold for too long. Hanging up. Ends phone call Go back Go backPhases ofthe Journey Inquiry Comparison Purchase Installation Description Description Description Description The Inquiry phase consists of the reasons people are The potential customer comes in to the Comparison The Purchase phase involves the provider demanding Installation phase is the handoff from customer shopping around for new service. These are usually phase usually armed with the right info, tech jargon, quite a bit of personal info. The order flow tends to be service to the installer. There are usually scheduling related to moving and relocation, an upgrade to and is looking for lowest cost. They tend to be brand complex and the process can be all over map. There is conflicts between all parties involved. This phase can existing service, or hunting down new deals. Moving agnostic . If they can’t find the right price or the right a sense of delayed gratification - waiting on service usually be somewhat painful for the customer in is the biggest reason. services, they may leave and go back to inquiry. installation and activation. dealing with installer. Recommendations Recommendations Recommendations Recommendations Design homepages with separate targeted call-out Recommend using IP Location services to geo-locate Reduce amount of info required by streamlining and Many factors converge to make this phase of the areas lying above the fold tailored for residential customers - removing the current service address improving any areas that contain form fields using customer journey unpleasant. Providing accurate customers and tech-savvy customers. Internal product roadblock. Allowing users to configure services before industry best practices. Work on setting expectations arrival times, courteous technicians, and clear instruc- areas should include basic plain-english product adding them to the cart, and reflecting bundled price for installation phase with customer service reps on tion materials during Installation can help alleviate descriptions and large price points with a clear call to discounts in a clear and obvious manner. the phone to improve overall experience with your the negative experience inherent in this phase. Also, action. Tech-savvy bullet points should include brand. consider having leave behind customer comment keywords that summarize options and features cards so customers feel empowered to give feedback typically found in product datasheets. into the process. the customer journey
  • 71. customer stories
  • 72. build prototypes based on research
  • 73. use prototypes to conduct empirical research
  • 74. inspire good design
  • 75. Mood Board : Showcase Mood Board : Slate Mood Board : Dynamicmood boards
  • 76. design compositions
  • 77. ensure business,design & technology collaboration
  • 78. TriGeo Console Project Milestone v_0.1 Last Modi ed: October 30, 2008 9:12 AMEXPERIENCE MAPThe Experience Map acts as a diagram of the “ ow” of anapplication. It is important to hone in on this high-levelframework of the application so a clear direction may beestablished. This map helps the direction of wireframes withoutgetting too far into the details.The content of the Experience Map is based on user research,a current understanding of the application and methods ofimproving usability. As more information is gathered andExperience Map evolves until a direction has been established.Creating the Experience Map was an ongoing process that ranin tandem with wireframes and creating design compositions.Although there was some inconsistent overlap due to these areasbeing done in parallel, thinking around wireframes helped totighten areas of the Experience Map and vice versa.In the end, a solid overview of the TriGeo Console was generatedthat acts as the foundation for additional development and userexperience re nement. There is still work to be done and directlycorrelates to the Wireframes. 20 experience maps
  • 79. wireframes
  • 80. Adobe Video Workshopgraphic components Adobe Video Workshop style guidegraphic elements and style guides
  • 81. interactive technical references
  • 82. articulate the vision
  • 83. vision demos
  • 84. bad news: GOOD UX IS HARD good news:THERE ARE REWARDSFOR GETTING IT RIGHT
  • 85. sales conversion time reduced by 35% manufacturing costs dropped by 42%online revenue grew from: $5 million to $85 million...all in less than 9 months
  • 86. Thank You #effec%veuiAnthony Franco twitter.com/anthonyfrancoPresident, EffectiveUI anthonyfranco.wordpress.com

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