(Un)writing the histories of Humanities Computing(s)

448 views
370 views

Published on

Paper 'Hidden Histories: Symposium on Methodologies for the History of Computing in the Humanities c.1949-1980. London: UCL, 17 September 2011.

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
448
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

(Un)writing the histories of Humanities Computing(s)

  1. 1. (Un)writing the histories of Humanities Computing(s)Edward VanhoutteDirector of Research & Publications, Royal Academy of Dutch Language & LiteratureHead, Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document StudiesResearch Associate, UCL Centre for Digital Humanitiesedward.vanhoutte@kantl.be@evanhoutte
  2. 2. http://historyproef.org/blog/teaching/digital-humanities-definitions-by-type/
  3. 3. HC ≠ DH
  4. 4. http://transducer.ontoligent.com/?p=717
  5. 5. http://tapor.ualberta.ca/taporwiki/
  6. 6. At a moment when the academy in general and the humanitiesin particular are the object of massive and wrenching changes,digital humanities emerges as a rare vector for jujitsu,simultaneously serving to position the humanities at the veryforefront of certain valueladen agendas—entrepreneurship,openness and public engagement, futureoriented thinking,collaboration, interdisciplinarity, big data, industry tieins, anddistance or distributed education—while at the same timeallowing for various forms of intrainstitutional mobility as newcourses are mooted, new colleagues are hired, new resources areallotted, and old resources are reallocated.Matthew Kirschenbaum
  7. 7. ●Discover, confirm and exemplify howcomputing affects analysis, so thatthe basic case for humanitiescomputing is clear and persuasiveacross the disciplines.●Identify and cultivate kinships withthe disciplines, so that humanitiescomputing is informed by thecollective ways of knowing they havecultivated.
  8. 8. ●Cultivate and exercise the ability toexplain the essentials of humanitiescomputing to non-specialistcolleagues and to the general public.
  9. 9. ●Develop as a prevalent habit andas a serious, essential aspect ofwork the strongly conversationalmode of scholarly publicationexemplified by Humanist and otherInternet forums.
  10. 10. ●Write the ethnography ofcollaborative engagements todocument how successfulcollaborations happen and howperceptions change in the encounterof the humanities with computing.●Develop a genuine historiographyof humanities computing fromexisting chronologies; begin writinghistories of the field.
  11. 11. ●History & computing (Adman, 1987)●Computing in musicology, 1966-1991 (Hewlett & Selfridge-Field,1991)●Statistical analysis of literature in Chum, 1966-1990 (Potter, 1991)● A Companion to Digital Humanities (2004) ● Archaeology ● Art history ● Classics ● History ● Lexicography ● Linguistics ● Literary studies ● Music ● Multimedia ● Performing arts ● Philosophy and religion
  12. 12. Humanities Computing = Semantic PrimitiveHistorical Knowledge ≈ Definition
  13. 13. Humanities Computing = Semantic PrimitiveHistorical Knowledge ≈ Definition 2 problems 1. Chronology of the definition 2. Defining power of the chronology
  14. 14. Unwriting the histories ofHumanities Computings
  15. 15. (Un)writing the histories of Humanities Computing(s)Edward VanhoutteDirector of Research & Publications, Royal Academy of Dutch Language & LiteratureHead, Centre for Scholarly Editing and Document StudiesResearch Associate, UCL Centre for Digital Humanitiesedward.vanhoutte@kantl.be@evanhoutte

×