Animals in Translation   A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment                            Edward Malesevich ...
I would like to thank my committee,                                                       for working with me and supporti...
table of content                                        thesis statement                                                  ...
t h e s i s                                              s t a t e m e n tanimals in translation :: edward malesevich     ...
thesis statement
. . . anywhere you find humans, you will almost certainly finddogs. We are inseparable. It is a unique experience on this ...
thesis statement
The relationship that some people have with their pets may                      The final type of human-animal relationshi...
thesis statement
As the bond between humans and their pets are strengthening,so are certain trends in American society. In 2007, 63 percent...
design goal
design goal             Attempting to evaluate the success of this project was an              issue that took some time t...
Provide humane treatment and spaces                                       for animals in a shelter environment            ...
Provide humane treatment and spaces                                          for animals in a shelter environment         ...
s i t e                                              a n a l y s i sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich   [19]
In 1834 Horace Chase becomes the first permanent settler in the Bay View area. Two years                                la...
Today, Bay View maintains its blue-collar feel, although properties along the lake of courserun higher than in interior pa...
Bay Street before expansion looking eastAerial view of the Kinnickinnic River and Mooring Basin   Bay Street before expans...
King’s Tap Tavern located north of site on Kinnickinnic AvenueTwo letter carrier wagons parked on Kinnickinnic as dirt roa...
Photo of Illinois Steel workmen in 1886                                                                                   ...
Grocery store located along Kinnickinnic around 1900Llewellyn Library of Bay View in 1934Alexander Stewart residence forme...
Sanborn Insurance map from 1894site analysis :: sanborn insurance maps
Sanborn Insurance map from 1910                                  Sanborn Insurance map from 1951                          ...
site analysis :: satellite photos
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [29]
site analysis :: figure ground
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [31]
buildings                       streetssite analysis :: figure ground
water   green spaces                       animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [33]
walking distances               green spacessite analysis :: figure ground
adjacent streets   green spaces                                  animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [35]
site analysis :: site views
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [37]
site analysis :: building context
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [39]
site analysis :: building context
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [41]
p r e c e d e n t                                              a n a l y s i sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich ...
precedents :: clinics and hospitals
Animal Clinic of Sterling Heights :: programmatic and typological precedentLocation: Sterling Heights, MichiganNo. of doct...
precedents :: clinics and hospitals
Leanne B. Roberts Animal Care Center :: programmatic and typologicalprecedentLocation: San Francisco, CaliforniaArchitect:...
precedents :: clinics and hospitals
Park Centre Animal Hospital :: typological and stylistic precedentLocation: Alameda Island, CaliforniaArchitect: Rauhaus F...
precedents :: pet resorts
Second Home Pet Resort :: programmatic precedentLocation: Phoenix, ArizonaSize: 16,000 SFThis precedent provides us with a...
precedents :: dog parks
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [53]
a                                              p r o j e c t                                              l a n g u a g ea...
Po rm S mmay rga u     rC mmu i C ne o   nt e tr       y                                     N t q ae o tg                ...
A Project Language         The proposed building program focuses on the threearchitectural elements discovered during earl...
Provide humane treatment and spaces                                                     for animals in a shelter environme...
Dog KennelsThe dog kennels are a group of special spaces that are entirely devoted to the animal’s needs.Instead of placin...
Provide humane treatment and spaces                                       for animals in a shelter environment            ...
Flexible Exam Rooms::   Table and workstation arranged to promote client/doctor relationship::   Folding exam table provid...
Flexible Exam Rooms::   Table and workstation arranged to promote client/doctor relationship::   Folding exam table provid...
Consultation Room::   Private office to discuss difficult cases and decisions::   Space to visit hospitalized animals, wat...
Provide humane treatment and spaces                                       for animals in a shelter environment            ...
Outdoor Exercise AreasThe outdoor exercise spaces provide multiple functions for both the staff and animals. It is meantto...
p r o p o s e d                                              d e s i g nanimals in translation :: edward malesevich   [67]
The Bay View Animal Shelter and Community Center                           The proposed design of the Bay View Animal Shel...
While the volumetric scheme was eventually decided upon, thefinal form of the building changed several times. The final de...
proposed design
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [71]
ter                                en                           it yC                         n                     mmu   ...
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [73]
proposed design
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [75]
proposed design
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [77]
proposed design
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [79]
proposed design
animals in translation :: edward malesevich   [81]
c o n c l u s i o n sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich   [83]
conclusions
My wife and I were extremely fortunate to find our dog Molly ata shelter. I would never say her short time there was in an...
Beerda, B. “Manifestations of Chronic and Acute Stress in Dogs.” Applied         Sales, G. “Noise in Dog Kennelling: Is Ba...
“AAHA Standards for Veterinary Hospitals,” American Animal HospitalAssociation. http://www.aahanet.org/web/practice_accred...
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment
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Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment

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A thesis study concerning animal behavior and how architecture can influence an animal\'s experience of a space

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Animals In Translation: A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment

  1. 1. Animals in Translation A Study in Animal Welfare and the Built Environment Edward Malesevich M. Arch, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee May 2011
  2. 2. I would like to thank my committee, for working with me and supporting me throughout this complicated process. I would like to thank my family, for raising me with the morals and values that have allowed me to become the man I am today. I would like to thank my wife, for loving and supporting me more than I could imagine possible. And I would like to thank all the pets in my life, for giving me this opportunity to return their love and affection that they have given me throughout my lifetime.thesis committeeGerald Weisman (Chair), Greg Thomson, David Rosene animals in translation :: edward malesevich [3]
  3. 3. table of content thesis statement design goal site analysis bay view history site diagrams site photos precedent analysis clinics and hospitals pet resorts dog parks a project language building program proposed design bay view animal shelter and community center conclusions bibliography “We give dogs time we can spare, space we can spare and love we can spare. And in return, dogs give us their all. It’s the best deal man has ever made” - M. Facklam animals in translation :: edward malesevich [5]
  4. 4. t h e s i s s t a t e m e n tanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [7]
  5. 5. thesis statement
  6. 6. . . . anywhere you find humans, you will almost certainly finddogs. We are inseparable. It is a unique experience on this earth for onespecies to take in another animal as a part of their household. We treatthem as fellow human beings, with all of the thoughts, feelings, andemotions of a family member. It is an incredibly close relationship. Weshare our lives, our homes, and our hearts. Human civilization, in fact, owes much of its existence anddevelopment to the dog. Without the domestication of the dog,civilization would not have been possible. We would, in fact, still be stuckas hunters and gatherers. This very close relationship between humansand dogs is one that has mystified scientists for centuries. This special relationship we have with dogs is unique on thisearth. No other animal has this relationship with humans. Dogs andhumans are incredibly attuned to each other, in a way that no other twospecies are. They relate to us on an emotional level. They are able to readour emotions, expressions, and feelings. Many people would explainthat their dogs can read their minds. We share more of our lives withdogs than with any other species. They come into our lives as strangers,but fast become an important member of our families. “When the world turns a cold shoulder to us. But this is not always the case. Some animals must travel a longjourney before they find the right family to go home with. Some mustwait months, even years, for the right person to find them. For those of us without loving mates, family, or close friends. This experience is, in most cases, fairly unpleasant for theanimal. We have all seen the images of the poor environments that And even for those of us with good familysome animals have to endure. Small cages, stacked on top of each other,offering little to no comfort for the animal. Animals striving for attention, relationships who enjoy good friends and theor social interaction. Unsanitary and inhumane conditions. respect of their community, but who simply have to compete in a ruthlessly competitive society... These images may be hard to look at. They represent afailure on many levels. This project, however, wishes to focus on the How nice it is to have a pet to come home to”architectural level. How can the built environment actually influence ananimals behavior? How can it allow animals to act normally, to socializewith other animals and humans, and still provide a clean and safe -Roger Ross, DVMenvironment for them to live? How can the building itself help in findingthese animals a home? These questions will end up shaping the goalsand objectives of this project. We owe this effort to our most loyal companions. They deservemore than we are currently giving them. This project is just one step onthe path to providing a more humane environment. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [9]
  7. 7. thesis statement
  8. 8. The relationship that some people have with their pets may The final type of human-animal relationship is one of anseem odd and confusing to others. But what has to be understood about actualizing relationship between the two. This special relationship beginsthese relationships is that they are formed for different reasons and out to change the bond from a dependent and one way relationship to oneof the different needs of each person. There are many forms a pet can that is more reciprocal. This bond will most often bring about benefitstake that replace human interaction in a relationship. Each individual for both the pet and the owner. A relationship such as this is oftenperson has their own reasons for owning a pet. Understanding easier found in pets than in humans, mostly due to the pet’s absence ofthese reasons allows us to better understand the different forms the emotional insecurities, expectations, or attitudes. The pet may becomerelationship can take. a “respected significant other; its intrinsic worth being appreciated for itself instead of for reasons of status, utility, or emotional support.” The relationship that a human has with their pet can come inmany different forms. Each type is formed out of a basic need for the Although these different forms of the human-animalanimal. The first relationship that will be discussed is the object-oriented relationship are inherently different, one may include forms of the otheror property relationship. This bond is nothing more than owning a pet or may develop from one to the next. The relationship that peoplefor the sake of owning a pet. The pet is more or less seen as another have with their pets is always changing. Understanding what thesepiece of property that must be maintained within the house. The pet relationships are and how they can benefit the lives of both the ownermay be as simple as an object to hold the attention of a child. Either way, and the pet is the first step in developing a response to the changingthis relationship is one that will most likely assign some inherent worth needs of animal welfare.or monetary value to the pet. Another relationship that is formed between humans andtheir pets is for utilitarian purposes. The pet is many ways used forthe exclusive benefit of the owner. Many of these animals are usedfor medical research, military or police work, and within agriculturalservices. This relationship is formed so humans may receive servicesfrom the animal, and therefore this utilitarian bond can be seen as theweakest and perhaps most destructive relationship. The next type of relationship is formed out of a person’sneeds once again, yet this form is directed towards the person’s “The human-animal bond is a mutuallyemotional needs. The pet is seen as a fulfillment of a person’s needs and beneficial and dynamic relationshipdependencies. This relationship is most often the primary reason peoplechoose to own a pet. Animals have the qualities to respond well to between people and animals that ishuman emotions. Pets are often seen as “an unconditionally affectionate influenced by behaviors that are essentialand accepting emotional support; with natural, uninhibited, andhonest emotions and responses; a refreshing break from the vacuous to the health and well-being of both”impersonal and often dehumanizing human transactions.” The pet maytake the place of several different human connections, including that -American Veterinary Medical Associationof an emotional and social friend. In this relationship, the animal willoften time serve as a therapeutic device for people to interact with. Theeffects that this relationship can have on a person’s emotional wellbeing,along with the development of children and the elderly, can simply beamazing. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [11]
  9. 9. thesis statement
  10. 10. As the bond between humans and their pets are strengthening,so are certain trends in American society. In 2007, 63 percent of Ameri-can families owned a pet, which accounts for over 70 million homes. Theveterinary industry generates nearly 40 billion dollars within the Ameri-can economy. Although this number may be small compared to theentire economy, this number has almost doubled in the last decade. Theveterinary industry is one that has rapidly grown in the last few years,and the growth of the veterinary clinic has followed suit. Advantages of owning a pet contain more than just emotionalsupport. Studies have shown that owning a pet can have amazing ben-efits on a person’s physical and mental health. Here are a few examplesof some of the benefits found in pet owners.:: Pets Help to Lower Blood Pressure: A recent study at the StateUniversity of New York at Buffalo found that people with hypertensionwho adopted a cat or dog had lower blood pressure readings in stressfulsituations than did those who did not own a pet.:: Pets Help to Reduce Stress: Walking with a pet helps to sooth nervesand offers instant relaxation. Studies conducted worldwide have shownthat the impact of a stressful situation is lesser on pet owners, especiallymales, than on those who do not own a pet.:: Pets Help to Prevent Heart Disease: Because pets provide people withfaithful companionship, research shows they may also provide theirowners with greater psychological stability, thus a measure of protectionfrom heart disease.:: Pets Help to Lower Health Care Costs: People with pets actually make “Dogs love their friends and bite their en-fewer doctor visits, especially for non-serious medical conditions. emies, quite unlike people, who are inca-:: Pets Help to Fight Depression: Pets help fight depression and pable of pure love and always have to mixloneliness, promoting an interest in life. When seniors face adversity love and hate.”or trauma, affection from pets takes on great meaning. Their bondingbehavior can foster a sense of security. - Sigmund Freud animals in translation :: edward malesevich [13]
  11. 11. design goal
  12. 12. design goal Attempting to evaluate the success of this project was an issue that took some time to discover. What was needed was a group of standards that could be used to evaluate the project, to give it a sense of direction. These standards were eventually derived from a study conducted in 1965 to determine welfare standards for agriculture. The Farm Animal Welfare Council developed what is called the Five Freedoms for Animal Welfare. The Five Freedoms for Animal Welfare were utilized as the standards by which to evaluate the success of this project. The primary goal of the project is to provide a more humane environment for animals. The Five Freedoms allow this goal to be organized into individual categories, where each has its own influence on the welfare of the animals. These freedoms were translated into architectural elements, ones that compose the building program for the project. The program was developed as an animal shelter and veterinary clinic, these being some of the most stressful environments for an animal to be in. All elements of the project were eventually related through this organizational chart. Each design decision refers back to the Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare. It is in this way that the project was to be evaluated. “In order to keep a true perspective of one’s importance, everyone should have a dog that will worship him and a cat that will ignore him.” - Dereke Bruce animals in translation :: edward malesevich [15]
  13. 13. Provide humane treatment and spaces for animals in a shelter environment The Five Freedoms For Animal Welfare Freedom from Freedom from Freedom from Pain, Freedom to Express Freedom from Fear Hunger and Thirst Discomfort Injury or Disease Normal Behavior and Distressdesign goal
  14. 14. Provide humane treatment and spaces for animals in a shelter environment The Five Freedoms For Animal Welfare Freedom from Freedom from Freedom from Pain, Freedom to Express Freedom from FearHunger and Thirst Discomfort Injury or Disease Normal Behavior and Distress Social Kennel Enclosure Exercise Areas Interaction Social Activity Control over the environment Veterinary Training and Environmental Clinic Exercise Surfaces Enrichment Environmental Enrichment Light Exam Room Waiting Area Treatment Ventilation Sound animals in translation :: edward malesevich [17]
  15. 15. s i t e a n a l y s i sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [19]
  16. 16. In 1834 Horace Chase becomes the first permanent settler in the Bay View area. Two years later in 1836 pioneer Elijah Estes staked out 150 acres on the south shore of Milwaukee overlooking Lake Michigan. It was here that Elijah and his wife Zebiah built their log home and farm. Later, a house still standing on the corner of Estes Street and South Shore Drive was built. Zebiah is credited with giving the name Bay View to the village. The Lake Shore Railroad completed a connection between Milwaukee and Chicago in 1855 and the first train depot in the Milwaukee area was located on South Bay Street in Bay View. Captain Eber Brock Ward, of Michigan opened his third rolling mill, The Milwaukee Iron Co., in Bay View in 1868. Within a year the village of Bay View sprung up as a company town around the steel mill. Cottages erected for mill workers became the center of the village. Many of these cottages are still occupied today and are a part of the diverse architecture of the Bay View neighborhood. With village incorporation in 1879, its rapid growth and demands for city services were so great that a vote was taken and the village was annexed to the city of Milwaukee in 1887.site analysis :: site history
  17. 17. Today, Bay View maintains its blue-collar feel, although properties along the lake of courserun higher than in interior parts of the city. Despite it’s working class roots, you’ll find thatmost parts of Bay View retain a high owner occupancy rate, and that the homes and prop-erties are very well kept. Housing stock in the area varies from small cottages built by steelworkers in the 1800’s to Victorians and Milwaukee bungalows.Bay View’s early days as a village helped create a degree of self-sufficiency for residents oftoday. The main thoroughfares of Kinnickinnic Avenue, Howell and Oklahoma, among oth-ers, are dotted with shops and restaurants, and other entertainment venues -- in fact, overthe past decade, the small, independent character of these main streets have attracted anumber of young entrepreneurs to the neighborhood, who in turn have opened a numberof unique businesses. As a result, Bay View could easily be considered one of the most fash-ionable neighborhoods in Milwaukee. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [21]
  18. 18. Bay Street before expansion looking eastAerial view of the Kinnickinnic River and Mooring Basin Bay Street before expansion looking westsite analysis :: site history Bay Street after reconstruction looking west
  19. 19. King’s Tap Tavern located north of site on Kinnickinnic AvenueTwo letter carrier wagons parked on Kinnickinnic as dirt road Aerial view of Milwaukee Harbor and southern neighborhoodsMilwaukee Auto Wreckers Store located on South Kinnickinnic Avenue animals in translation :: edward malesevich [23]
  20. 20. Photo of Illinois Steel workmen in 1886 Photo of the Illinois Steel State Militia in 1886 The Bay View Massacre was the culmination of events that began on Saturday May 1, 1886 when 7,000 building-trades workers joined with 5,000 Polish laborers who had organized at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to strike against their employers, demanding an eight-hour work day. By Monday, these numbers had increased to over 14,000 workers that gathered at the Mil- waukee Iron Company rolling mill in Bay View. They were met by 250 National Guardsmen under order from Governor Jeremiah M. Rusk to “shoot to kill” any strikers who attempted to enter. Workers camped in the nearby fields and the Kosciuszko Militia arrived by May 4. Early the next day the crowd, which by this time contained children, approached the mill and were fired upon. Seven people died as a result, including a thirteen-year-old boy. Several more were injured during the protest.site analysis :: site history Aerial view of the entire Illinois Steel Co. plant
  21. 21. Grocery store located along Kinnickinnic around 1900Llewellyn Library of Bay View in 1934Alexander Stewart residence formerly located north of the site Car attempting a left turn onto Lincoln Avenue from Kinnickinnic animals in translation :: edward malesevich [25]
  22. 22. Sanborn Insurance map from 1894site analysis :: sanborn insurance maps
  23. 23. Sanborn Insurance map from 1910 Sanborn Insurance map from 1951 animals in translation :: edward malesevich [27]
  24. 24. site analysis :: satellite photos
  25. 25. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [29]
  26. 26. site analysis :: figure ground
  27. 27. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [31]
  28. 28. buildings streetssite analysis :: figure ground
  29. 29. water green spaces animals in translation :: edward malesevich [33]
  30. 30. walking distances green spacessite analysis :: figure ground
  31. 31. adjacent streets green spaces animals in translation :: edward malesevich [35]
  32. 32. site analysis :: site views
  33. 33. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [37]
  34. 34. site analysis :: building context
  35. 35. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [39]
  36. 36. site analysis :: building context
  37. 37. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [41]
  38. 38. p r e c e d e n t a n a l y s i sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [43]
  39. 39. precedents :: clinics and hospitals
  40. 40. Animal Clinic of Sterling Heights :: programmatic and typological precedentLocation: Sterling Heights, MichiganNo. of doctors: 6Cost per square foot: $197.00Total cost: $2,740,000.00Building cost: $1,220,000.00Total square footage: 6,200This mid-sized animal clinic consists of a total of six veterinarians, along with a full line ofstaff and assistants. This particular clinic contains several exam rooms, a treatment room,surgery areas, boarding services, and staff areas. This precedent represents a standardprogram within an animal clinic or hospital.This clinic also represents a stylistic typology that is being built within this project’s sitelocation. The building here contains a variety of industrial features that correlate wellwith what is being built within the project site. This includes the use of more industrialmaterials, such as glass, steel, and masonry. This precedent also displays a minimalapproach to ornamentation and decoration.While there are several aspects of this clinic that fit well into the project in question, thereis one particular aspect that should be avoided. This is the consideration of the lobbyor reception area. This clinic, in my opinion, does a very poor job with its treatment ofthe reception area. While the space may appear to be interesting to the eyes, it does notlook at all comfortable. An uncomfortable owner and pet will most likely lead to a poorexperience of the space in general. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [45]
  41. 41. precedents :: clinics and hospitals
  42. 42. Leanne B. Roberts Animal Care Center :: programmatic and typologicalprecedentLocation: San Francisco, CaliforniaArchitect: Rauhaus Freedenfeld & AssociatesSize: 150,000 SFThis state-of-the-art, animal care facility within an unprecedented 150,000 SF, includes amultitude of functions. The animal medical functions include an Animal Shelter Hospital,a Primary Care Veterinary Hospital, a Specialty Referral Hospital with an OncologyDepartment and a Physical Therapy Department, a Spay/Neuter Clinic and a Feral CatClinic. Training functions include a Hearing Dog Program. Administrative and Educationalfunctions include a lecture hall and continuing education areas. This facility will alsocontain ancillary profit components such as pet retail, doggie day care, agility instructionand training & obedience classes.Housed within a building that was formerly a warehouse, the hospital is an innovativeadaptive reuse project. Using the shell of this extremely rigid concrete building, thearchitects, Rauhaus Freedenfeld, built the hospital within the warehouse, a building withina building.This is a state of the art veterinary hospital. Equipment, finishes, lighting, everything hasbeen optimized to provide top notch care to the dogs and cats served here. Simple thingslike counseling rooms where vets and staff can privately discuss care decisions with petguardians demonstrate a humane treatment of animals and humans alike. High tech fea-tures such as remote monitoring equipment allow vets and assistants to view an animal’svital signs from any computer in the hospital. It is impossible to walk through this hospitaland not sense the commitment to animal well-being; it’s evident throughout.This particular hospital represents a much larger program than the typical clinic usu-ally includes. The extra components such as the agility instruction, doggie day care, andcontinuing education areas are certain aspects that would fit well into a clinic offeringalternative medical practice within animal healthcare. Also, the inclusion of physicaltherapy and rehabilitation is becoming an extremely important part of animal healthcareand wellbeing today. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [47]
  43. 43. precedents :: clinics and hospitals
  44. 44. Park Centre Animal Hospital :: typological and stylistic precedentLocation: Alameda Island, CaliforniaArchitect: Rauhaus Freedenfeld & AssociatesSize: 5,300 SFPark Centre Animal Hospital is located in Northern California on Alameda Island in the SanFrancisco Bay Area. It is approximately 5,295 SF and was designed to replace their 50 yearold hospital of approximately 2,000SF. The New Park Centre Animal Hospital operates as afull service veterinary medical center offering medical, surgical, dental, preventative medi-cine and diagnostics for small mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians.This new facility’s design is contemporary and was inspired from the craftsman style. Theexterior architectural treatment reflects a discriminating use of metal roofing, espaliers,performance glazing, shiplap siding and plasterwork. The warm earth tones on the build-ing and the landscaping used for the site were also selected to complement the surround-ing residential area. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [49]
  45. 45. precedents :: pet resorts
  46. 46. Second Home Pet Resort :: programmatic precedentLocation: Phoenix, ArizonaSize: 16,000 SFThis precedent provides us with an example of a pet resort or day care center. Thisparticular resort contains many amenities that are becoming more prevalent in animalcare today. Some of these include, a variety of boarding rooms and suites, large outdoorplay areas, swimming and wade pools, activity centers, and spas. This resort also offers daycare services to customers, allowing them to drop off and pick up their pets daily and alsoallows the pets to be more active and social throughout the day. Pet Resorts are quicklyresponding to the growing needs of the everyday pet owner. This resort, along with others,are just the beginning of the ways in which the veterinary industry is responding to theneeds of pet owners. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [51]
  47. 47. precedents :: dog parks
  48. 48. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [53]
  49. 49. a p r o j e c t l a n g u a g eanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [55]
  50. 50. Po rm S mmay rga u rC mmu i C ne o nt e tr y N t q ae o tg e S u r F oa e AR ti p c .ea S ae l 10 00 BTa i S ae n Cas o .rin p c a d l r ms ng so 10 00 CGo mi Sai . ro n tt n g o 10 00 30 00V tr ay l i eei r Ci c n n ALb yWa i .o b / i g tn 10 00 BR cpi .ee t n o 40 0 CEa R o ( .xm o ms4 ) 40 0 D C nu ai R o .o sl t n o m to 20 0 ETet n Ae .rame t ra 80 0 FS rey .ug r 40 0 G I li .o t n s ao 20 0 H Da n sc h r c . i ot/ amay g iP 20 0 30 60A i lh l r n R h blain nmaS et a d e a itt e i o AK n e ( @8S) .e n l 4 s 8 0F 40 00 BGo p l Aes2 . ru P y ra ( a ) 10 00 CSa Wok ra .tf rAes f 10 00 60 00O f e a d d ns ain fcs n A mii rt i t o AS e e Ofe ( .h l r fcs2 t i ) 40 0 BS e e C nee c R o .h l r o f ne o m t r 40 0 CCic fcs2 .liOfe ( n i ) 40 0 D Cic ra R o .liBek o m n 40 0 10 60P biS ae a d i uain u l p cs n Cr lt c c o ASoa e .trg 10 60 BP biR s o ms4 .u l et o ( c r ) 40 0 CSa R s o ms2 .tf et o ( f r ) 20 0 20 20 T tl e Ae oaN t ra 1 ,0 64 0 N to rsM l l r e t Gos u i y t e p 15 . T tl rsAe oaGos ra 2 ,0 46 0 O to rxrs Aes ud o Eec e ra i 1 ,0 00 0 T tl ulig o tr t oaB i n F opi d n 3 ,0 46 0building program
  51. 51. A Project Language The proposed building program focuses on the threearchitectural elements discovered during early research. Each elementfocuses on a specific freedom that can be addressed to better theanimal’s welfare. These three elements are divided into healing spaces,living spaces, and social spaces. Each element is linked to each otherby the broader goal of providing a more humane space for the animals.And each is linked by more formal and spatial adjacencies that becomedefined further along in the design process. While this spatial diagram did allow the research to bemanifested in another way, the functions needed to be further defined.This is where the building program is created. The program was definedby creating a series of patterns, a project language that could be usedhelp discover both spatial and organizational needs. Each of the threearchitectural elements have their own set of patterns that contribute totheir understanding. The individual patterns consist of simple diagrams andsketches. Each pattern has its own ideas and objectives that are meantto contribute to the overall welfare of the animals. The individualpatterns do not solve all of the issues, but collectively they can addressa larger range of problems. The project language is a collection of ideasmeant to accomplish the broader goal, to provide a more humane spacefor animals. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [57]
  52. 52. Provide humane treatment and spaces for animals in a shelter environment The Five Freedoms For Animal Welfare Freedom from Freedom from Freedom from Pain, Freedom to Express Freedom from Fear Hunger and Thirst Discomfort Injury or Disease Normal Behavior and Distress Kennel Enclosure Surfaces Environmental Enrichment Light Ventilation Soundbuilding program
  53. 53. Dog KennelsThe dog kennels are a group of special spaces that are entirely devoted to the animal’s needs.Instead of placing the kennels in an interior space with views or daylight, an animal should haveample access to both. The majority, if not entirety, of the exterior walls should be devoted to spacesthat are occupied by the animals. Along with views, the animals should be given proper ventilation.It is also important to provide the animals a bench or platform to raise them off of the floor. Thisallows the animals better views to both the interior and exterior spaces. These benches can then beused as safe places for the animals to sleep and rest. It is most important to provide the animals achoice in how they experience the space. The kennel is therefore divided into two spaces, one thatfaces the interior and is more open so that the animals can interact with the staff and other dogs,and another space that is more private and is directed towards the exterior views. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [59]
  54. 54. Provide humane treatment and spaces for animals in a shelter environment The Five Freedoms For Animal Welfare Freedom from Freedom from Freedom from Pain, Freedom to Express Freedom from Fear Hunger and Thirst Discomfort Injury or Disease Normal Behavior and Distress Veterinary Clinic Exam Room Waiting Area Treatmentbuilding program
  55. 55. Flexible Exam Rooms:: Table and workstation arranged to promote client/doctor relationship:: Folding exam table provides options for both the client and veterinarian:: Folding table provides a larger, more open space:: Clerestory provides daylighting and ventilation animals in translation :: edward malesevich [61]
  56. 56. Flexible Exam Rooms:: Table and workstation arranged to promote client/doctor relationship:: Folding exam table provides options for both the client and veterinarian:: Folding table provides a larger, more open space:: Clerestory provides daylighting and ventilationbuilding program
  57. 57. Consultation Room:: Private office to discuss difficult cases and decisions:: Space to visit hospitalized animals, watch educational videos, and help with the grieving process:: Comfortable seating and open space:: Office should be flexible to account for patient overflow animals in translation :: edward malesevich [63]
  58. 58. Provide humane treatment and spaces for animals in a shelter environment The Five Freedoms For Animal Welfare Freedom from Freedom from Freedom from Pain, Freedom to Express Freedom from Fear Hunger and Thirst Discomfort Injury or Disease Normal Behavior and Distress Exercise Areas Social Activity Training and Exercise Environmental Enrichmentbuilding program
  59. 59. Outdoor Exercise AreasThe outdoor exercise spaces provide multiple functions for both the staff and animals. It is meantto be a space for the animals to get exercise and interact on a social level. It can be organizedto accommodate different activities such as obstacle training, obedience classes, and groupsocialization. The outdoor spaces are designed to flow seamlessly from interior to exterior. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [65]
  60. 60. p r o p o s e d d e s i g nanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [67]
  61. 61. The Bay View Animal Shelter and Community Center The proposed design of the Bay View Animal Shelter and Community Center focuses again on the three architectural elements devised from research. While these first diagrams dealt with these ideas on a more schematic level, the diagrams had to be refined to produce a more architectural diagram. Therefore, the three elements were shaped into a spatial diagram that could be transformed into an architectural element. This architectural element had several different iterations. The one that was eventually selected allowed for the distinction of the three architectural elements. Each element was represented in a three bar scheme. This allowed for the separation and distinction of each function, being the healing, living, and social spaces. These three functions are connected by a linear circulation and service bar. The residual spaces created by this three bar scheme are therefore utilized for the exercise areas and group activities. When all of these elements are placed together, they create the volume that represents the building itself. While the three bars are often perceived as solids and the exercise areas as voids, this perception is meant to change as one approaches the building itself. As one moves along the street, solids may become voids and vice versa. The building is never meant to have only one reading, but is meant to change according to the occupant and location.proposed design
  62. 62. While the volumetric scheme was eventually decided upon, thefinal form of the building changed several times. The final design utilizeda gentle curve in multiple planes. The roof forms of the bars curveslightly to create a facade that does not dominate the street. The secondcurvature is utilized within the circulation bar, to allow this parti to beviewed from multiple approaches. The materials and structure were designed to be clean, simpleforms much like the overall parti. The structure consists of steel beamsand columns. Exterior materials range from glass curtain walls withaluminum mullions and shading, to concrete fiber panels for cladding.Interior materials utilized wood panels throughout the circulation andpublic spaces. However, to maintain a certain degree of cleanliness,wood was not used within the veterinary clinic. Throughout the entirebuilding, acoustic panels were utilized to control sound levels. The outdoor exercise areas consist of two separate spaces.The larger volume is designed to be protected from the weather,utilizing a light and transparent material known as ETFE, or ethylenetetrafluoroethylene. Pneumatic panels are manufactured to createlightweight air cushions, that not only provide protection from theelements, but also provide a certain degree of insulation. This materialwas chosen for its ability to maintain constant temperatures and also itsflexibility of color, opacity, and patterns. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [69]
  63. 63. proposed design
  64. 64. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [71]
  65. 65. ter en it yC n mmu Co er helt al S im An Ve te r in ary Cli nicproposed design
  66. 66. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [73]
  67. 67. proposed design
  68. 68. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [75]
  69. 69. proposed design
  70. 70. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [77]
  71. 71. proposed design
  72. 72. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [79]
  73. 73. proposed design
  74. 74. animals in translation :: edward malesevich [81]
  75. 75. c o n c l u s i o n sanimals in translation :: edward malesevich [83]
  76. 76. conclusions
  77. 77. My wife and I were extremely fortunate to find our dog Molly ata shelter. I would never say her short time there was in any way negativeor harmful. Yet, I cannot forget the image of the one dog that did not getpicked. The one dog that did not find a family to go home to that night.One cat that will be forced to wait for months and months to leave theshelter. I can’t help but ask why there will always be one animal thatwill never find a home? Is it their behavior? Their temperament? Theirappearance? Or is it something entirely different. Is it the very environmentthat these animals experience every day? The spaces that are the onlyhome they have ever known. Can these environments actually help theseanimals find a home, instead of forcing them to spend their entire lives ina fearful and foreign space? It is a harrowing thought to know that these lines I have drawn,these images I have created could have such an impact on one life. It isliterally a matter of life or death. It is an issue that deserves more study,that cannot be accomplished with a single project. It will take a series ofefforts to change the model of animal care. These animals deserve thechance to live a comfortable life, free from fear and distress. They deservea more humane environment. It is literally the least we can do to repaysuch devotion. “Dogs are our link to paradise. They don’t know evil or jealousy or discontent. To sit with a dog on a hillside on a glorious after- noon is to be back in Eden, where doing nothing was not boring--it was peace.” -Milan Kundera animals in translation :: edward malesevich [85]
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