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Hipaa

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    Hipaa Hipaa Presentation Transcript

    • CAN YOU BELIEVE THIS? 1
    • In Jacksonville FLA woman brought her teenagedaughter to work at thehospital, and left herunattended at a logged incomputer. The girl looked uppatient phone numbers, andphoned to tell them that theydtested positive for H IV. Onepatient attempted suicide. 2
    • In Rapid City SIDA medical student took homecopies of patients psychiatricrecords to work on a researchproject. When finished, hedisposed of the material in thedumpster of a fast foodrestaurant (where they werefound and given to anewspaper reporter). 3
    • In Miami FLSeveral hundred hospitalworkers browsed through therecords of a famous patientthat had recently come to thefacility, even though few ofthem were actually involved inthe case. 4
    • In Minneapolis MNA university health facility sentemails to transplant recipientsthat revealed the names ofhundreds of donors to whomconfidentiality had beenpromised. 5
    • In Tampa FLA county health departmentworker copied lists of HIVpatients, distributed theinformation to his friends andsent the information to a localnewspaper. 6
    • In Missoula MTA hospital posted thepsychiatric records of dozensof children on its public website, where they remained forweeks until discovered by anewspaper reporter. 7
    • Reactions to these sorts of abuses, as well as a general concern abouthealth privacy, led to the passage of HIPAA 8
    • What is HIPAA? HealthThe Health InsurancePortability and Accountability InsuranceAct. PortabilityIt’s the LAW!It’s the RIGHT THING TO DO! Accountability Act 9
    • What is health insurance portability?This means that if you want to changeyour health insurance in any way orchange insurance companies, it iseasy to do so.For example, maybe your family isgoing to have a baby or you lost yourjob and now have to get insurancefrom your husband’s or wife’sinsurance company. HIPAA makes iteasy. 10
    • What is health insurance accountability?This means that your healthinformation is kept private andsecure. Only those people whomust have information aboutyou to provide care or toprocess your records shouldknow your private healthinformation. 11
    • The visitor who passes acomputer screen, thehousekeeper who cleans yourhospital room or employeestalking in an elevator shouldnot learn anything about yourhealth information because it isprivate. It must be protected –and it is called protected healthinformation (PHI). 12
    • All healthcare organizationsmust take special steps toprotect your health information.They and their employees canbe fined and/or imprisoned ifthey do not follow special rulesto protect your privacy. 13
    • As you study about HIPAA, we want you to ask yourself these questions:1. Would I or my family want people to gossip about my medical or personal information? 14
    • 2. What kinds of changes need to be made in my department or by me to protect other people’s privacy? 15
    • 3. Am I willing to risk being fined, losing my job or going to jail because I don’t follow the legal, the ethical, the RIGHT thing to do? 16
    • Who has access to protected health information?Lots of folks! Caregivers,medical records employees,utilization reviewers, folks inbilling, insurance providers,and students could all look atprivate information. 17
    • BUTOnly those who must knowinformation to provide care ordo the work necessary tocomplete businessresponsibilities are legally andethically allowed to know anduse the information. 18
    • ANDThey must make sure theyguard the information so itdoes not become known orused by anyone else. It mustbe kept confidential. 19
    • How do we protect confidentiality?A. DO NOT give any information about a patient to anyone who is not directly involved in the care of the patient unless the patient gives an official consent or unless the law requires it. 20
    • Why? Because . . .If patients are afraid to give usall their health informationbecause we don’t keep itprivate, they will not receive thecare they need and may suffer. 21
    • Why? Because . . .If the patients think we don’tprotect their personalinformation, they will gosomeplace else. 22
    • Why? Because . . .Accurate research to improvehealthcare will NOT occur if apatient holds back privateinformation. 23
    • Why? Because . . .Health Care cannot be costeffective without accurateinformation. 24
    • HOW?1. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: your family who asks about a hospitalized neighbor 25
    • HOW?2. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: a friend who heard a celebrity is on your unit 26
    • HOW?3. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: a co-worker who is concerned about the diagnosis of a colleague who has a lump in her breast 27
    • HOW?4. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: the visitor who just left the patient’s room 28
    • HOW?5. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: the person who calls and says she is the patient’s daughter. 29
    • HOW?6. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: the official-looking man who says he is the patient’s lawyer. 30
    • HOW?7. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: the reporter who is writing an article about the patient 31
    • HOW?8. This means you should say, “I’m sorry, that information is confidential and we cannot share that info” to: ANYONE YOU KNOW DOES NOT HAVE A LEGAL REASON TO KNOW ABOUT THE PATIENT. 32
    • WAYS TOPROTECT PRIVACY 33
    • Ways to Protect Privacy1. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Not talking about patients in public places like the cafeteria, elevator, by the water cooler, in lounges, waiting rooms or parking garages. 34
    • Ways to Protect Privacy2. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Being sure no one can see your computer screen while you are working. 35
    • Ways to Protect Privacy3. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Never sharing your access code. 36
    • Ways to Protect Privacy4. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Logging off when not working on your computer. 37
    • Ways to Protect Privacy5. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Changing your code and notifying your supervisor if your code becomes known by anyone else. 38
    • Ways to Protect Privacy6. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Not leaving information on answering machines or E- mails because you don’t know who can get your messages. 39
    • Ways to Protect Privacy7. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Leaving only your name and your number on message machines when you are asking patients to call you back. 40
    • Ways to Protect Privacy8. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Being sure you are in a private area when listening to or reading your messages. 41
    • Ways to Protect Privacy9. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Knowing who you are speaking to on the phone if not sure – get a name and number to call back after you find out it is OK to do so. 42
    • Ways to Protect Privacy10. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Being sure no one around you can overhear your conversation, especially in an office or waiting room 43
    • Ways to Protect Privacy11. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Using ONLY a standard phone because cellular phones can be scanned. 44
    • Ways to Protect Privacy12. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Never leaving documents unattended. – Store, file, shred or destroy according to your departmental policy. 45
    • Ways to Protect Privacy13. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Making sure Fax numbers are correct and use a cover sheet with a confidentiality statement. 46
    • Ways to Protect Privacy14. Make sure no one gets private and protected health or personal information by Giving your supervisor any papers or materials with patient information you find anywhere such as – a classroom or lounge – cafeteria, floor or wastebasket. 47
    • OTHERS WAYS TOPROTECT PRIVACY 48
    • Other ways to protect patient privacyIf you happen to see a patientin any public place, be verycareful in greeting them. Theymay not want others to knowthey have been a patient. 49
    • Other ways to protect patient privacyWhen calling patients in waitingrooms for appointments ortalking to them in ourhealthcare facilities talk tothem in a way that does notdisclose their full name, doctoror reason for their visit toothers who may over hear. 50
    • Other ways to protect patient privacyEven when a patient hassomeone with them, they maynot want that person to heartheir private information so askthe person to wait outside. Ifthe patient requests them tostay, that is OK. 51
    • Other ways to protect patient privacyDo not post patient’s namesand diagnosis or doctor’s nameand private information in anypublic areas such as waitingrooms, nursing stations orassignment boards. 52