Ccna3 intro wan
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  • 1. By Your Name CCNA 3 Chapter 1 Review: The OSI Reference Model and Routing
  • 2. Objectives
    • Describe the overall function of the OSI reference model and the problems it solves
    • Describe the characteristics of the:
      • OSI physical layer
      • OSI data link layer
      • OSI network layer
      • OSI transport layer
    • Describe the function of routing in networks
    • Understand the different classes of routing protocols
  • 3. Benefits of the OSI Model?
  • 4. OSI Layers with Purpose
  • 5. Peer-to-Peer Communication
  • 6. Data Encapsulation
  • 7. Types of Ethernet
    • Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 — LAN specifications, which operate at 10 Mbps over coaxial and twisted-pair cable.
    • 100-Mbps Ethernet — A single LAN specification, also known as Fast Ethernet, which operates at 100 Mbps over twisted-pair cable.
    • 1000 Mbps Ethernet — A single LAN specification, also known as Gigabit Ethernet, which operates at 1000 Mbps (1 Gbps) over fiber and twisted-pair cables.
    • 10 Gigabit Ethernet is only supported over fiber optic media.
  • 8. Three Varieties of 10 Mbps Ethernet
    • 10BASE-2
      • Known as thin Ethernet or thinnet
      • Allows network segments up to 185 meters on coaxial cable
    • 10BASE-5
      • Known as thick Ethernet or thicknet
      • Allows network segments up to 500 meters on coaxial cable
    • 10BASE-T
      • Carries Ethernet frames on inexpensive twisted-pair wiring
  • 9. Encapsulation
  • 10. The Physical Layer
  • 11. The Data Link Layer
    • The Ethernet/802.3 Interface
  • 12. Comparing Models
  • 13. Address Classes
  • 14. Address Class Prefixes
  • 15. Subnetting Chart
  • 16. Layer 3 Addresses - Path and Host Information
  • 17. ICMP Testing
  • 18. How ARP Works
  • 19. Routing Table
  • 20. IGP vs . EGP
  • 21. Path Determination
  • 22. Network and Host Addressing
  • 23. Path Selection and Packet Switching
  • 24. Network Layer Devices in Data Flow
  • 25. Routing Metrics
  • 26. Routed Versus Routing Protocol
  • 27. Path Switching The network layer (3) address does not change. The data link layer (2) MAC address changes for each segment.
  • 28. Static Versus Dynamic Routes
    • The purpose of a static route
    • Why dynamic routing is necessary
    • Dynamic routing operations
    • How distances on network paths are determined by various metrics
    • Classes of routing protocols
    • Time for convergence
  • 29. Static Versus Dynamic Routes
  • 30. Dynamic Routing Operations
  • 31. Routing Protocols
    • A routing protocol defines the set of rules used by a router when it communicates with neighboring routers, including the following:
      • How to send updates
      • What knowledge these updates contain
      • When to send this knowledge
      • How to locate recipients of the updates
  • 32. Time to Convergence
  • 33. Distance Vector Routing Basics
    • Routing updates explained
    • The problem of routing loops
    • The problem of counting to infinity
    • Link-state routing basics
    • How link-state protocols exchange routing information
    • How topology changes propagate through the network of routers
  • 34. Distance Vector Routing Basics
  • 35. Distance Vector Discovery
  • 36. Distance Vector Topology Changes
  • 37. Routing Metric Components
  • 38. Link-State Routing Basics
  • 39. Counting to Infinity
  • 40. Split Horizon
  • 41. Route Poisoning
  • 42. Link-State Network Discovery
  • 43. Link-State Topology Changes
  • 44. Link-State Concerns
  • 45. Distance Vector Versus Link State
  • 46. Hybrid Protocols Cisco’s EIGRP
  • 47. The Transport Layer
    • Segmenting upper-layer applications
    • Establishing a connection
    • Data transfer
    • Reliability with windowing
    • Acknowledgment techniques
  • 48. "Reliable" Transport
  • 49. Three-Way Handshake
  • 50. Data Transfer
  • 51. Windowing – Flow Control
  • 52. Positive Acknowledgment