Desenhar com o 123D (english v.)
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  • 1. Autodesk 123D – Beta5 OverviewWelcome. This overview document for Autodesk® 123D™ will assist you in developing your understanding of thesoftware and how you can use it to create your design ideas.Designing in Autodesk 123D .................................................................................................................... 2Overall Process ....................................................................................................................................... 4User Interface .......................................................................................................................................... 5Navigation ................................................................................................................................................ 8Selection .................................................................................................................................................. 8Adding ‘Placed Features’ to the Model Design ......................................................................................... 9Creating 3D Model Geometry Using Sketches ....................................................................................... 13Geometric Constraints ........................................................................................................................... 15Precise Input .......................................................................................................................................... 16Units ...................................................................................................................................................... 16Creating 3D Models Using Primitives ..................................................................................................... 17Directly Edit the Model Geometry ........................................................................................................... 21Combine ................................................................................................................................................ 23Using Dimensions or Assembly Constraints to Incorporate Design Intent .............................................. 24Import .................................................................................................................................................... 27Document your Design........................................................................................................................... 28Share Your Designs ............................................................................................................................... 29 Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 1
  • 2. Designing in Autodesk 123DWhen you design in 123D, you create solid models that are an electronic representation of your ideas. 123Denables you to create precise models in both size and structure, in the units and precision that you require. If yourdesign consists of separate parts, you can represent the relationship of those individual parts by combining theseparate components into an assembly. From your design, you are able to view the relationship of the differentcomponent parts and make physical objects from your design ideas.In the following illustration, two different views of the same design consisting of multiple separate componentsare shown. By having separate components, you electronically organize the solid bodies of the design to matchthe intended physical world. Along with enabling you to organize your design, having separate componentsenables you to easily set the material and color and control the visibility of each individual component.After you complete your design in 123D, the physical versions of the designed parts can be created manually ordirectly from the solid model. To directly create a physical part from the solid model version, you can export thesolid to a file that can then be used by computer controlled machines. The part can be created using processeslike stereo lithography (also known as rapid prototyping or STL), water jet cutting, or CNC machining. If you areusing the STL process, you can select to have an entire assembly of parts created or just a single part.Along with being able to create highly precise models and create assembly structures of multiple components,you can also have the model display in near realistic terms. The way you look at the model can be set to aperspective view; you can set the material, color, and appearance of the part or part faces; have shadows castonto parts and onto the ground; have a reflection of the design shown on the ground; and set the environment orbackground image.In the following illustration on the left, the assembly design is shown using default materials and colors with aplain solid color background and an orthographic view. On the right, the same assembly design is shown withmaterials and visual settings applied, shadows and reflections being cast in an environment, and the view set toperspective.2
  • 3. You have a lot of flexibility in how you create the solid models that represent your designs. 123D enables you tocreate 3D primitives, parametric features, and sketches that you convert into 3D shapes. You can use thesecreation methods in any combination to shape the solid model.The following illustrations show four basic primitive shapes and then a model that was created entirely usingthose primitive shapes. As you can see, the shape of the model consists of some primitives adding volume andother primitives removing volume.In the next illustration, the base shape of the solid model was created from a 2D sketch that was extruded. Thegenerated shape was further refined with the addition of a rounded top edge and beveled inside edge. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 3
  • 4. 123D will let you start with very rough generic shapes and then use various methods to modify the shape or sizeand add details. A primary editing method is to do direct model edits. The direct model edit method enables youto modify the design regardless of how the 3D geometry was initially created.In the following illustration, a more freeform and complex shape was created by directly manipulating the facesand edges of a simple box primitive, using smart features such as ‘editing edges’ and ‘symmetry’. The editsconsisted of moving the edges of the end face close toward the middle, pulling that end face out and rotating itback, and editing the position of the top edges.Overall ProcessIf you are new to 3D modeling, the basic workflow is to create an initial shape with volume (either using Primitivesor by making 3D shapes from sketches) and then refine that shape using the Combine tools or sketches drawn offaces that help remove or add volume. Another way to refine the design is to directly adjust the initial volume’ssize and shape by manipulating edges or faces of the initial shape.The following illustration shows the progression of the design as it went from a standard primitive solid shape to amore complex shape. Along the way, volume was added and removed to the initial solid and the general size andshape was directly modified.4
  • 5. The concept of Assembly and components is a very important one in 123D.Unlike design applications that are structured around layering systems, 123D offers a structure of an assemblyconsisting of many components that one can reuse, repeat, copy, paste, combine, put in relationships, etc., so youcan create different variations or easily evaluate a design model.This structure is clearly displayed in the Browser that additionally offers easy selection and visibility controls forthe individual components as well as their individual features (to view and control the individual features of acomponent, select the toggle Features to ‘on’ above the Browser).User InterfaceAny time you start using a new software application, you must become comfortable with the user interface andthe methods for starting commands, the workflows for creating your work, and the ways you can view your work.123D has a streamlined and simplified user interface that makes it easy and quick to become comfortable withthe user interface.The following illustration identifies and describes the primary aspects of the Autodesk 123D user interface. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 5
  • 6. Application Menu: Used to access additional application related commands, such as application options, saving design files as a specific file type, accessing existing content, and printing the design. Quick Access Toolbar: Use the commands located here to create a new file, open, or save a design. Also use to undo previous actions or redo an undo. Command (Main) toolbar: This toolbar contains the tools for creating and modifying the model geometry. The use of this toolbar is two parts. You click once on the toolbar to display the commands within that category. You then click the command you want to start. View Cube: You use the View Cube to change the direction you are viewing your design from and quickly access standard orthogonal views Navigation toolbar: Use the commands on this toolbar to dynamically adjust the viewing of the design and to change how the design is viewed graphically. Click Customize on the toolbar to toggle on additional commands so you can set the display to include shadows and reflections, and the shading settings. Status Bar: Toggle on or off the options on the status bar to control things like the display of geometric constraints, precise dimension entry, sketch grid, and have sketch geometry snap to the grid. Snap Bar (Units): This option can be toggled on within the Application Options dialog box. This dialog box is accessed by clicking Options on the Application menu. The Snap Bar enables you to specify the units that you are working in and what the snap distance is when creating geometry. By default, the snap value adjusts to the first division on the Snap Bar scale. If you zoom into or out of the view, the snap remains at a reasonable value. Browser: The browser displays the structure of your assembly and its individual parts. These contents may include the organization of components and the listing of sketches, assembly constraints, and annotation planes. The browser can be a primary area where you go to access editing options, control the display of aspects of the design and use it to make selection of components. Canvas: This is the area where your design is displayed as you create and modify it.6
  • 7. Along with the different elements of the user interface, 123D also has various context sensitive tools and optionsavailable while you are working in-canvas. These in-canvas interface options enable you to follow a heads-upapproach where you access commands and options right at the location where your cursor is currently located.Depending on what you have selected or what command is active, you may have in-canvas toolbars display thatenable you to select options, select specific geometry, or enter exact values. For some commands, manipulatorswill display that enable you to set the size or position of the geometry by clicking and dragging the manipulator.The following illustration shows an example of the in-canvas menu and manipulators as a sketch profile is beingextruded (in this case, drawing a box and then sketching a profile on one of its sides). When you select thesketched shape, the in-canvas menu options first display as single icons. By hovering the cursor over the icon, alist of additional options for that menu item will display. When you are creating a feature, the relevant fields andoptions also display in-canvas. In this example the distance value for the extrusion is shown along with the optionsfor setting the direction and type of operation. The distance is set by dragging the arrow manipulator. The anglecan be set by dragging the arc arrows after clicking the sphere.Whatever tool you choose to use, always look up for additional icons, pills or menus that appear next to themouse as they guide you through the process, or offer the additional selection or tool options.Commands and options are also available in a marking menu or shortcut menu.The marking menu and shortcut menu is accessed by using the right mouse button. When you click the rightmouse button in canvas, the marking menu and/or shortcut menu will display depending on what is active orselected. If you right-click, only the marking menu is active. In the case of a right-click and drag, the commandoption that is in that section of the click and drag will be run when the right mouse button is released.An alternative technique to execute a command in the marking menu involves gesture behavior. This is usefulwhen you are very familiar with the marking menu layout and need a faster way to execute commands. So beforeusing gesture behavior, a little practice with the marking menu to develop some muscle memory around thelayout of the marking menu is helpful.A gesture consists of starting the marking menu (right mouse down), immediately dragging the cursor to thelocation of the intended marking menu wedge and releasing the right mouse button before the entire marking Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 7
  • 8. menu is displayed. If these operations are completed within 250 milliseconds, only the selected wedge is brieflydisplayed to confirm that the operation was performed.During the drag gesture, a trail is visible in the canvas, showing the cursor path. When you release the cursor, theselected wedge is displayed for a brief time span. The command corresponding to this wedge then gets executed.In the following illustration on the left, the marking menu and shortcut menu is shown when nothing is selectedand no command is active.On the right, one of the commands on the marking menu is being accessed through a gesture (right-click anddrag). This is the fastest way to get to your commands.NavigationBeyond using the View Cube or the Navigation bar for orbiting and reorienting the 3D view of your model, youcan also change the viewing angle and distance by directly using the mouse. Scrolling the mouse wheel zoomsthe display in and out while clicking and dragging the mouse wheel pans the display. To orbit the display usingthe mouse you just need to press SHIFT while clicking and dragging the mouse wheel. You can zoom, pan, andorbit all the while working in a different command.SelectionMechanical designs often have many objects in the canvas, which can make selecting the appropriate objectdifficult if traditional selection methods (windows selection as example) are applied. 123D offers two ways ofselecting items: - Browser selection: we strongly recommend reaching to the browser for main selections of components or individual features. The browser lists all components and even the individual features of the components. - In-Canvas selection: when selecting an entity with the mouse, a selection glyph appears, offering different options that make it easier to select obscured or difficult-to-select geometry. These options are accessible8
  • 9. through a glyph which can be seen when you hover the cursor over a face/edge, and include select ByDepth, Parents, and Neighbor.Windows selection, typical for other 2D and 3D programs, does not currently exist in 123D.Adding ‘Placed Features’ to the Model DesignAdding rounded or beveled edges, holes, and hollowed out parts to a modeled geometry are referred to as‘placed’ features.Fillets and chamfers are added to the outside or inside edge of your model. A fillet creates a radius between thefaces that create the selected edge. A chamfer adds an angled face between the faces that create the selectededge.In the following illustration, the same part is shown before (1st image) and after the addition of fillets (2nd image)or chamfers (3rd image).Hole features are parametrically created features that are placed on existing model geometry. You can createhole features with a number of different options, such as simple, counter bore, and counter sink.In the following illustration, two different views of the same part show examples of the different types of holesthat you can add to your designs.With the Shell command, you can remove material from an existing part and create a cavity in the part byspecifying a wall thickness for the faces. Generally, you select at least one face on the part to be removed fromthe shell feature, leaving the remaining faces as the shell walls. This is particularly practical for both digital Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 9
  • 10. modeling of real shapes with wall thickness as well as for 3D printing that uses less material and produces lighterobjects.In the following illustration, The model is shown before and after adding a shell feature. Notice that the one facewas set not to shell (which enables us to view inside the part) and how the wall thickness is consistent through thepart.And here a vase shape that has been initially modeled as solid full revolve and then applied shell to it.ACCESSING FEATURESWhen you want to add a placed feature to your design, you have two primary locations where you can start thecommands. Those two locations are the Create category of the command toolbar or the Solid Features shortcutmenu that displays on the right mouse click.10
  • 11. Command Toolbar > Create In-Canvas Shortcut MenuIf you want to chamfer or fillet an edge of the model, you can also access the commands from the in-canvas menuafter selecting that edge. After you select a model edge, the in-canvas menu displays the icon for the Filletcommand. Click that icon to start the Fillet command. Hover over that icon to expand the menu so you can selectany one of the commands in that menu. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 11
  • 12. Placed features are parametric features. This means that they are listed in the browser and can have their valuesmodified after creation. The features are not automatically displayed in the browser. To have them display in thebrowser, click the Toggle Features on the Browser title bar. You change the values of a placed feature by double-clicking the feature in the browser and then entering a new value in the value field.In the following illustration on the left, the hole feature is shown being double-clicked in the browser to activate itfor editing. On the right, that activated hole is shown being modified by clicking and dragging its manipulators.12
  • 13. Creating 3D Model Geometry Using SketchesSometimes for the geometry you want to create, it is easier or required that you create a sketched feature.Sketched features are 3D features that are created from an existing 2D sketch. When you create a sketchedfeature, you begin by first creating the sketch or profile for the 3D feature. For simple sketched features, thisprofile usually represents a 2D section of the 3D feature being created. For more complex sketched features,multiple sketches can be created and used within one sketched feature.In the following illustration, the base shape of the part was easily created from the initial input sketch. Creatingthis shape from primitive shapes would have taken the creation of multiple shapes.When you create a sketched feature, you create solid model volumes that add, remove, or are an intersection ofany existing solid body. The sketched feature can be an extrusion, revolution, loft or sweep of the sketch.A profile or path sketch can consist of objects such as points, lines, arcs, circles, and splines. You can use severalmethods to create closed shapes. You can use tools such as the rectangle, circle, or polygon, or you can constrainsketch geometry so that separate sketch elements come together to create a closed shape. At times you mayneed to create sketch geometry that is not closed, for example, a path for a sweep or loft feature.Sketching GuidelinesFollow these guidelines for successful sketching:  Keep the sketch simple.  Repeat simple shapes to build more complex shapes.  Draw the profile sketch roughly to size and shape.  Use 2D constraints to stabilize the sketch shape before setting size.  Use closed loops for profiles. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 13
  • 14. The following illustrations show different model shapes being created from sketched geometry. Each feature usesthe exact same ellipse as a base. Creating additional sketches and sketch geometry can generate very complexgeometry with very simple inputs. The sequence of the methods illustrated in the images below are: Extrusion,Loft, Revolution, and SplineOne more detail. During the extrusion of certain sketch shape, let’s say a rectangle, and before finishing theheight for the box, you will notice a red dot under the yellow arrow for extrusion. If you position your mouse overthe red point, a taper manipulator will display a circle, dragging along which you can taper the shape of the cube.14
  • 15. Geometric ConstraintsWhen you are sketching geometry, the geometry is controlled by geometric constraints and sized by numericvalues. As you create geometry in 123D, some geometric constraints are applied automatically. The easiest way toview what geometric constraints are applied to sketch geometry is to toggle on the display of geometricconstraints. You toggle on the display of geometric constraints on the status bar. You can remove a geometricconstraint by selecting it when it is displayed and then pressing DELETE. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 15
  • 16. To manually add a geometric constraint to sketch geometry, you select the sketch geometry and then therequired geometric constraint from the in-canvas display. If you want to apply a geometric constraint betweentwo pieces of sketch geometry, you need to press CTRL while you select the second piece of geometry. After bothobjects are selected, you can then select the required geometric constraint.Precise InputAs you sketch the geometry, if you have Precise Input enabled, you can enter exact distances to define its size.After the geometry is created, you can adjust its size by double-clicking the sketch geometry and then enteringthe required value.UnitsThe units of the model are defined and can be changed in the Snap bar. The visual control of the Snap bar displayis in the Applications menu, under Options.16
  • 17. Creating 3D Models Using PrimitivesThere are eight different primitive shapes that you can create dynamically; they are box, pyramid, wedge, cone,cylinder, torus, sphere and polyhedron. You access the creation of all of these primitives from the Commandtoolbar. You first click Primitives on the toolbar and then you click the primitive you want to create. Change imageWhen you create a primitive solid, you start its creation by defining its base shape and orientation. The planewhere you start sketching determines the orientation of the solid body. The result of creating the primitive willeither be adding it to the solid body of the active component, cut the volume, or be a resultant of the intersectionof what exists and what is being created.While you are creating a primitive, you can interactively drag its size an approximate distance, use snap to set itssize, enter exact values, or select existing geometry to help define its size. To enter an exact size, the status baroption Precise Input must be enabled. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 17
  • 18. In the following illustration, a box is being created with a precise size. The value fields are displayed becausePrecise Input is enabled. The distances are snapping to an exact increment because the Sketch Grid Mode optionis also enabled.The orientation of the primitive is dependent on the initial sketch plane. The possible planes that you can sketchon include one of the three origin planes, on a work plane, or on any flat face on any existing model geometry.You set the orientation of the initial sketch by either pressing Tab to cycle through the origin planes (x,y,z) or byhovering over a visible plane or face.After the base solid has been created, any resulting shape after creating a primitive can be the addition,subtraction or intersection of the primitive’s volume to the initial solid volume. You also have the option ofcreating a new component. By default 123D does its best to guess if it should add or remove the volume. Youswitch the operation through the in-canvas menu during the creation of that primitive.18
  • 19. Placing the primitives is quite straight forward, however here are a few further details on some of them.Pyramid:The default set pyramid base is 3 sided, but you can change this to 4, 5, etc., by entering new values in the fieldthat dispalys the number of sides (to access that field, click on Tab key while dragging the base shape). After anew value is entered, the number of sides changes and then you drag the height. By changing the numbers of thebase you can get any of the shapes in the following figure.PolyhedraQuite an amazing array of really complex shapes can be made with few clicks, using the Polyhedra tool. 123D supports4 base types of Polyhedrons: Platonic, Catalan, Archimedes and Kepler, each of which contains subshapes. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 19
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  • 21. Directly Edit the Model GeometryAfter you have created the initial solid model for a design, you can resize and reshape the design by directlymanipulating that solid body. The resizing and reshaping is done by using the Press/Pull, Move, or Edge Editcommand.You use the Press/Pull command to change the size of a part by pulling a part face away from the part or pushingthe face into the part. By doing this edit, you end up offsetting the face from its initial position to a new location.Press/Pull can invoke two additional commands: Fillet and Extrude. If, while in the Press/Pull command, youselect a model edge, a fillet starts on that edge. If you select a sketch closed profile, an extrude starts on thatprofile.The Move command enables you to move or rotate model geometry or entire components. When you move orrotate model geometry, you can change the position and orientation of one or more faces or edges.In the following illustration, two views of a cylinder with a taper are shown during and after the moving of the topcircular edge. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 21
  • 22. You start the Press/Pull and Move commands from the Press/Pull category of the command toolbar, the markingmenu, or in-canvas menu. The Move command is also accessible from the Browser and upon selecting any component in itCommand Toolbar > Create In Canvas Shortcut Menu Marking MenuYou can use the Edit Edge command to reshape a model by changing the position of points along an edge. Afteryou select an edge to edit, points display on that edge. The number of points along a selected edge depends onthe shape of the edge. Additional points can be added at any location along the edge. Through the use of thiscommand, you can easily create very complex model shapes.In the following illustration, the shape of the model was dramatically changed just by editing two edges that werecreated by splitting the flat face with a rectangle shape.If the model shape you are modifying is symmetric, prior to editing an edge you can enable and define aSymmetry plane. After defining the symmetry plane, as you edit one edge the same edit occurs to thesymmetrical edge.22
  • 23. You start the Edit Edge command from the Freeform category of the command toolbar or the in-canvas menu.Command Toolbar > Create In-Canvas MenuCombineAnother way to arrive to desired forms is combining different bodies and parts. This is done using the Combinetoolset that you can access from the context menu, right click, under the Solid features. The combine commandwill prompt a glyph, that when expanded offers three Boolean actions: Join, Cut, and Intersect.The workflow is to first select the command (Combine), than pick the glyph and select which type of combine(Join, Intersect or Cut) and finally pick (recommended to do from the browser) first the body that will be affected,and second the one that will perform the action. You finalize the action with OK on the right click.In the example below, the action of cut is performed, first picking the Box and then the Torus and finish with OK. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 23
  • 24. If you switched the order of selection and first picked on the torus and then on the box, the result would havebeen a torus sliced in its half by the box.Using Dimensions or Assembly Constraints to Incorporate DesignIntentAfter you have created model geometry or multiple components in a design, you have the option of creating andincluding additional design intent. The design intent can be in the form of dimensions or assembly constraints.Dimensions are added using the Dimension command and constraints are added using the Assemble command.You start the Dimension or Assemble command from the Design Intent category of the command toolbar or theshortcut menu.Command Toolbar > Design Intent In-Canvas Shortcut MenuDimensions that are added between geometry in the same solid model can drive the size of that model geometry.When you first add a dimension to a model, that dimension is initially driven by the selected geometry. Thismeans that the dimension value is a reflection of the current distance or angle. After you have added a dimension,24
  • 25. you can use that dimension to drive the geometry size or position by editing the dimension value.To edit the value of a dimension, with no command active you just double-click the current dimension value andenter the required value. A dimension that has been edited is automatically locked so it continues to drive thegeometry. When a dimension is locked, the size or angle of the dimensioned geometry will remain that value evenif you attempt to do a direct edit of the geometry.In the following illustration, the linear dimension for the material thickness is shown being edited and the resultsof that edit.The value for a locked dimension displays in bold text. A locked dimension also displays a Lock glyph when thecursor is positioned over that dimension. An Unlock glyph indicates the dimension is not locked and is thereforedriven by the geometry. By clicking the glyph, you can toggle the lock for that dimension. If you add a dimension between separate components in a design, that dimension will only be a driven dimension.When a dimension is added to a model, it is placed on a flat plane based on the selected geometry. That flat planeis called an Annotation Plane. Depending on what geometry is selected to dimension, there may be multiple Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 25
  • 26. planes that dimension can be created in. Prior to setting the position of the dimension value, you cycle throughthe available planes by pressing TAB.Each annotation plane that is created for a dimension is added to the browser under Annotation Planes. Thesebrowser entries enable you to toggle on and off the visibility of the dimensions and delete all dimensions on thatannotation plane.When your design consists of multiple parts, you can incorporate your intention of how the components relate toeach other by adding assembly constraints. An assembly constraint is a defined relationship between thegeometry on one component and the geometry on another component. The general workflow is to start theAssemble command, select the geometry on the component you want to move, select geometry on the secondcomponent, ensure the required constraint type is active, and enter the offset distance or angle.The types of assembly constraint relationships are mate, flush, angle, align, center, and tangent. The type ofconstraint that will be available to use will depend on the geometry you select. The available constraining optionswill be different if you select flat faces on both components versus selecting circular edges on both components.To change the type of constraint to use, after selecting the geometry on one or both components, you select theconstraint type from the in canvas list. The offset distance or angle value is also entered in canvas.Each assembly constraint you add is listed in the browser under Assembly Constraints. The two components thatwere selected are listed below the constraint. By right-clicking the constraint in the browser, you access theoptions for editing, suppressing, and deleting the constraint.26
  • 27. ImportYou can incorporate other designs that you already have, that you downloaded for free from 123Dapp.com orelsewhere, or purchased. 123D supports import of the following file types: 123D, DWG (3D), STEP (only up toversion 7.0), SAT, IGES, OBJ, SKP, 123C, STL, DXF (3D).It is important to understand that 123D is a solid modeler and will only be able to fully edit imported models aslong as they are solid models. If the imported models are meshes (usually coming from SketchUp, Blender, Max,Maya, Modo etc) 123D can read them, display them, resize and reposition but not geometrically edit them. Thepurpose of those models would be either to serve as scenes and props for enhancing the environment forvisualization or to add to the 123D native model for the purposes of 3D printing. 123D currently does not readsurfaces.The base of the ring below was made natively in 123D and the sheep is a mesh model, downloaded from123Dapp.com, placed on top of the ring, resized and positioned and then all together saved as STL to be sent to a3D printer. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 27
  • 28. Document your DesignAside from the dimension tools that help drive your designs as well as document them, 123D has ways to measurequantity, mass, volume, perimeter etc. of the shapes/materials used in your design.MeasureThe Measure command provides two important functions:  Provide geometry information (distance, angle, area, and so on).  Populate input boxes with measurement.Access the measure command in the fly out of any input box (right click anywhere in the canvas, you will findMeasure in the list)You can select objects in the browser or in the graphics window when using measure. You can also use filters tocontrol which geometry types are eligible for selection. The filter appears on the flyout menu after the Measurecommand is invoked.Depending on what you selected (a face, an entire body etc.) you can get different valuable information about thesize, volume, mass, perimeters of the selected entities. These values can be copied to the clipboard and pastedelsewhere for reuse.28
  • 29. Share Your DesignsAfter you have completed your design, you may want to share it with others so they can view it, send it to aservice so one or more parts can be machined or rapid prototyped, or print it for your use. Each of these tasks isinitiated from the Application menu.ImageTo create an image file of what you see in canvas, go to the Application menu and click Publish > Image. You thenspecify the type of image file you want to create and the image setting to use.Save 3D filesBy clicking Save As, you have the option of saving the design file as a different file type. You can save to thefollowing file formats: native 123D, STL, SAT, DWG, DXF, IGES, VMRL or STEP file. For 3D printing, you will need toselect the STL or VMRL file type. (STL is the de facto standard format for 3D printing; VMRL serves as a file formatfor color 3D printing, something STL format does not do).When you use the Save As option to save a design file as an STL file, the entire contents of that file are saved tothat STL file. If your design consists of multiple components and you want to save just one component that is in adesign of multiple components to an STL file, in the browser right-click that component. In the shortcut menu clickSave As. You then set the save as file type to STL.The current STL export is ASCII export. While 123D reads both the ASCII and binary version of STL, it currently onlyexports in ASCII.Note: STL saves both 123D natively created geometry as well as any imported mesh geometry. While the STLoutput of model exclusively modeled in 123D is watertight solid for 3d printing, when a mesh has been importedinto a 123D file, the resulting STL might not be 3D printing ready if the mesh import had issues such as gaps orwater tightness.Publish 2D Sheets Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 29
  • 30. To communicate designs to others, document design or connect with some fabbing machines, one needs tocreate 2D vector drawings of the designs.123D supports creation of 2D sheets for documentation drawings and for printing. The current capabilities of thisfirst version of the 2D sheet tool include:  Creation of sheets in various standard sizes  Ability to create multiple sheets (all appear as separate nodes in the browser)  Placing standard views on the sheet (Top, Bottom, Left, Right, Front, Back, and Isometric views)  Setting various scales per model view  Setting graphic appearance per view  Edit properties of each view after they have been placedCurrently 123D does not support adding any annotations or text.The proposed workflow for creating final 2D sheets is to create a sheet in 123D and once the sheets is ready and isactive, publish it using the Publish function to either AutoCAD WS or to AutoCAD DWG where you can add text,dimensions etc.(to clarify: ‘Save AS’ DWG saves only 3D entities. ‘Publish’ to AutoCAD DWG publishes the 2D layout sheet).You have two choices for workflows of finalizing 2D sheets: Publish 2D sheet to AutoCAD WS or DWG:  Publish to AutoCAD WS (a FREE online view, edit and share drafting and documentation service available at www.autocadws.com) where one can then add Text, Dimensions, annotations, make a sheet layout with lines, etc. (Be sure, once it is published to AutoCAD WS, in the AutoCAD WS environment to switch to View tab, Layouts and there change the view to 2D Layout sheets so to see the exact sheet you made in 123D.)  You can also simply publish to AutoCAD DWG which will save a 2D DWG file on your desktop and then use any 2D CAD editor to add text, dimensions etc. or manually upload later to AutoCAD WS30
  • 31. Enjoy using Autodesk 123D Beta5!Autodesk, AutoCAD and 123D are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or othercountries. All other brand names, product names, or trademarks belong to their respective holders. Autodesk reserves the right to alter product and servicesofferings, and specifications and pricing at any time without notice, and is not responsible for typographical or graphical errors that may appear in thisdocument. © 2011 Autodesk, Inc. All rights reserved. Autodesk® 123D™ Beta 5 ■ 31