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End inmind spr2011
 

End inmind spr2011

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over view of the three stages of backwards design

over view of the three stages of backwards design

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  • Need: copy of blank template, copy of example template
  • Ask participants to write a short reflection about how this quote relates to lesson and unit planning
  • Stop to do a quick frayer method with the unit “teaching unit” – at your table, write a short definition, provide and example and a non-example

End inmind spr2011 End inmind spr2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Do you know where you are going? End in Mind Curriculum Design
  • End in Mind Curriculum Design To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you’re going so that you better understand where you are now so that the steps you take are always in the right direction. -Stephen R. Covey http://www.flickr.com/photos/katiedee/3814099459/
  • Teaching Unit definition Example of topic Non-example
  • Educators have adopted “End In Mind Design” into 3 steps for the instructional design process in Standards Based Education
    • Stage 1. Identify Desired Results
    • Stage 2. Plan Assessment Evidence
    • Stage 3. Design the Learning Plan
  • First… Identify Desired Results
    • What should students be able to K now, U nderstand and D o at the end of this unit?
    • What are my “ transfer goals ”? These are related to but not limited by the SOLs.
    • What are the essential questions that students will revisit, discuss, and debate during this unit?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaysk/443274048/
  • Stage One – Desired Results is the same for all students
  • From the ACPS Pacing Guide SOL 1.11 The student will recognize the symbols and traditional practices that honor and foster patriotism in the United States by a) identifying the American flag, bald eagle, Washington Monument, and Statue of Liberty; b) demonstrating respect for the American flag by learning the Pledge of Allegiance. Civics 1.1 Quarter 4
    • Unit Ten
    • Change in Dimension is Huge?
    • Two and Three Dimensional Shapes (2-3 weeks)
    • Transfer Goals: Students will:
        • 1. Find the surface area and volume of three-dimensional shapes.
        • 2. Understand how a change in one dimension of an object results in predictable changes in area and/or volume.
    • Essential Questions:
        • 1. How can we apply the strategies for finding the surface area and volume to solve real-world problems?
        • 2. How can we use ratios to compare similar objects?
        • 3. How can we use characteristics of similar objects to predict the changes in area and/or volume?
    • Enabling Knowledge Objectives (Know/Do):
    • Declarative Knowledge (Know): Students will know:
    • 1. Key vocabulary terms: solid, polyhedra, face, surface area, lateral area, slant height, volume, hemisphere, length, perimeter, area, similar, dimension
    • 2. There are formulas that can be used to calculate the volume of solids.
    • 3. The surface area of a three-dimensional object is the sum of the areas of all its faces.
    • 4. The volume of a three-dimensional object is the number of unit cubes that would fill the object.
    • 5. A change in one dimension of an object results in predictable changes in area and/or volume.
    • 6. A constant ratio exists between corresponding lengths of sides of similar figures.
    • 7. Proportional reasoning is integral to comparing attribute measures in similar objects.
    • Procedural Knowledge (Do): Students will be able to:
    • 1. Find the total surface area of cylinders, prisms, pyramids, cones, and spheres, using the appropriate formulas.
    • 2. Calculate the volume of cylinders, prisms, pyramids, cones, and spheres, using the appropriate formulas.
    • 3. Solve problems, including real-world problems, involving total surface area and volume of cylinders, prisms, pyramids, cones, and spheres as well as combinations of three-dimensional figures. Calculators may be used to find decimal approximations for results.
    • 4. Compare ratios between side lengths, perimeters, areas, and volumes, given two similar figures.
    • 5. Describe how changes in one or more dimensions affect other derived measures (perimeter, area, total surface area, and volume) of an object.
    • 6. Describe how changes in one or more measures (perimeter, area, total surface area, and volume) affect other measures of an object.
    • 7. Solve real-world problems involving measured attributes of similar objects.
  • From the Curriculum Framework SOL 1.11 The student will recognize the symbols and traditional practices that honor and foster patriotism in the United States by a)identifying the American flag, bald eagle, Washington Monument, and Statue of Liberty; b)demonstrating respect for the American flag by learning the Pledge of Allegiance. Identify and explain symbols. Gather, classify, and interpret information.
    • Terms to know
    • Symbol: A picture or thing that stands for something else
    • Tradition: A custom or belief that happens over a long period of time
    • Patriotic: Showing respect for and love of country
    • American flag: A flag representing the United States
    • Patriotic symbols of the United States
    • American flag
    • Bald eagle
    • Washington Monument
    • Statue of Liberty
    • Citizens say the Pledge of Allegiance to demonstrate respect for the American flag and the United States.
    What are some patriotic symbols and traditions of the United States? How do citizens demonstrate respect for the American flag and the United States? The United States has patriotic symbols and traditions. Patriotic symbols and traditions honor the people and the history of the United States. Essential Skills Essential Knowledge Essential Questions Essential Understandings
  • Transfer Goals: What are they?
    • Which of your standards will you teach for deep understanding of this unit?
    • How will students be expected to demonstrate that they have conceptual understanding and can transfer the concepts independently?
    • (should only have 1-3)
  • Transfer Goals: Examples
    • Students will:
    • Use their knowledge of whole number operations to build an understanding of fraction operations.
    • Students will:
    • Express personal reflections and insights about the nature of narrative writing.
    • Students will:
    • Plan appropriate and scientifically valid diets for themselves and others.
    • Students will:
    • Solve real-world problems involving the measures of interior and exterior angles of polygons.
    • Students will:
    • Know that if you add up the interior angle and the exterior angle you’ll get 180.
    • Students will:
    • Develop oral presentation skills.
    • Students will:
    • Choose appropriate vocabulary and tone for presentation to a selected audience.
  • Essential Questions: What Are They?
    • Interpretative
    • Worthy of inquiry and investigation
    • The heart of the discipline
    • “ revisit-able”
  • How are form and function related in Biology? How does an elephant use its trunk?
  • How do effective writers hook and hold their readers? What is foreshadowing?
  • Enabling Knowledge Objectives
    • Declarative:
    • Students will know…
    • Facts
    • Concepts
    • Generalizations
    • Rules/Laws
    • Theories
    • Procedural:
    • Students will do…
    • Skills
    • Procedures
    • Processes
    • Stage 1. Identify Desired Results
    • Stage 2. Plan Assessment Evidence
    • Stage 3. Design the Learning Plan
    Educators have adopted “End In Mind Design” into 3 steps for the instructional design process in Standards Based Education
  • Secondly…Plan Assessment Evidence Pre-assess Summative Assessment Ongoing Formative Assessment
  • Creating your Summative Assessment
    • Decide exactly how you will ask students to demonstrate their understanding at the end of the unit.
    • If one piece is a test, review SOL questions from Released SOL Tests that show how your objective is assessed by the State of Virginia.
  • From a Released SOL Test
    • 2 When people say the Pledge of
    • Allegiance, they promise to be loyal
    • to the United States and to the —
    • F President
    • G school
    • H Congress
    • J flag
  • Formative Assessment
    • Ongoing assessment you do during your unit to inform your instructional decisions BEFORE the summative assessment.
    • Admit Passes, Class Projects, Journals, Blogs, Discussion Boards, Self-Reflections, Homework….
    • Stage 1. Identify Desired Results
    • Stage 2. Plan Assessment Evidence
    • Stage 3. Design the Learning Plan
    Educators have adopted “End In Mind Design” into 3 steps for the instructional design process in Standards Based Education
  • Stage Three: Design the Learning Plan
    • Balance in your head your:
    • understanding of your students’ current level of knowledge (preassessment with error analysis),
    • students’ learning styles, and
    • the format of your summative assessment TO PLAN the students’ learning experiences in the unit.
  • W – Where are we headed? H – How will you hook and hold my attention? E – How will you equip me for success? R – How will you encourage me to refine, revisit, rethink, revise ? E – How will I be asked to self- evaluate ? T – How will you tailor instruction for me? O - How will I be helped to move from acquisition to transfer ?
  • Maintain ALIGNMENT
  • The Process of Instructional Planning
    • Traditional Practice
    • Select a topic from the curriculum
    • Design instructional activities
    • Design and give an assessment
    • Give grade or feedback
    • Move on to new topic
    • End In Mind Design
    • 1. Objectives - Select standards from among those students need to know
    • 2. Assessment - Design an assessment for students to demonstrate understanding of objectives
    • 3. Learning Plan - Decide what learning opportunities students will need and use data from assessment to give feedback, reteach, or move to the next level
  • To Review: Non Examples: Definition: Examples: End In Mind Curriculum Design