Aan dipecho v mtr report.doc
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Aan dipecho v mtr report.doc

on

  • 2,074 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,074
Views on SlideShare
2,074
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Aan dipecho v mtr report.doc Aan dipecho v mtr report.doc Document Transcript

  • Surakshit Samudaya II:  Building Community Resilience to disaster  DIPECHO V Project Implemented by ActionAid Nepal                      MIDTERM REVIEW REPORT                        Submitted to:  ActionAid Nepal                  Submitted by:  Nahakul Thapa  Team Leader – (Review Team)  May 2010  1
  • List of abbreviations  DRR      Disaster risk reduction  AAN      ActionAid Nepal    HFA       Hyogo Framework for Action   PVA       Participatory vulnerability analysis   DMC      Disaster management committees   SMC      School management committees   NSET      National Society for Earthquake Technologies   MoHA       Ministry of Home Affairs   MoE       Ministry of Education   CBDRM     Community‐based disaster risk management   DAO      District Administration office  DDC      District Development Committee  DEO       District Education Office   IEC       Information education and communication   VDC       Village development committees   CA       Constituent Assembly   PTA      Parents teachers association                    2
  • Table of Contents:           Page      1. Cover Page            1  2. Abbreviations            2  3. Background            4  4. Objectives of the mid term Review      5  5. methodology            6  6. Review Team            6  7. Executive Summary          7‐8  8. Major findings / observations of the Review   9‐15  9. Recommendations          16‐17  10. Annex ( MTR TOR)          18‐25      3
  • Background    Action Aid Nepal has received funding support from European Commission through its Humanitarian  Aid  department  (under  DIPECHO  V  Action  Plan  for  South  Asia)  to  implement  a  15  month  project  titled  “Surakshit  Samudaya  II:  Building  Disaster  Resilient  Communities,  Nepal”.  The  project  will  be  implemented in three districts of Nepal (Banke, Sunsari and Udayapur) in association with AAN local  partners,  directly  covering  nearly  13,000  people  in  7  municipal  and  5  village  development  committees. This includes refresher activities in 8 wards covered under the DIPECHO IV project. The  project  is  co‐financed  by  Australian  Government  –  AUSAID.  ActionAid  Nepal  is  implementing  DIPECHO project for consecutive third term now, having successfully completed two previous cycles  under DIPECHO III (2006‐07) as well as DIPECHO IV (2007‐09).    The specific objective of the project is to strengthen capacities of community and local institutions  for reducing impact of disasters and ensuring rights of disaster vulnerable people    The  key  components  of  the  project  includes  community  mobilization  and  strengthening  of  leadership  through  REFLECT  and  participatory  processes,  awareness  generation,  capacity  building,  skill  enhancement,  model  small  scale  mitigation  measures  and  networking,  to  be  implemented  based on principles and values of participation, transparency and accountability. National advocacy  on DRR/HFA is one of the key components of the project to ensure a sound DRR policy framework.    Project Objective    To  strengthen  capacities  of  community  and  local  institutions  for  reducing  impact  of  disasters  and  ensuring rights of disaster vulnerable people    Expected Results and Activities    Result 1:  Capacity  of  target  communities  is  enhanced  to  reduce  impact  of  disasters  through  collective  local  actions    Activities to achieve Result 1:  1. To mobilize the community and strengthen grassroots institutions:   Formation  and  continuation  of  18  REFLECT  circles  and  DMCs  (8  old  from  DIPECHO  IV),  periodic  meetings  of  REFLECT  circles  and  DMCs;  development  of  community  level  action  plans on DRR  2. To train DMC members and community volunteers on preparedness and emergency response:  Training  on  CBDRR  for  160  people  including  DMC  members,  volunteers,  teachers  and  students;  training  to  150  volunteers  on  First  Aid,  Light  Search  and  Rescue  and  Emergency  Response;  Training  to  48  staff  and  volunteers  on  Participatory  Vulnerability  Analysis;  REFLECT ToT to 24 persons  3. To equip communities with disaster management materials, fund and Early Warning Systems:  Establish disaster rescue and relief kit including for food and water security during disasters;  establishment of emergency relief fund within the 10 target communities; training on EWS  to  60  volunteers;  workshop  on  EWS  with  different  stakeholders  for  60  persons  from  government and community and establishment of CBEWS with support from Practical Action    Result 2:  Enabling environment created through appropriate DRR policies and plans  4
  • Activities to achieve Result 2:  1. Form and strengthen networking of DMCs and stakeholders in district level  Form and strengthen district level networking of DMCs and stakeholders; organize network  meetings, exposure visit of DMC members to other areas within Nepal  2. Train government officers and NGO leaders on DRR/HFA  Training to 60 government officers and 60 NGOs on DRR/HFA  3. Advocate towards national policy framework on disaster risk reduction  Sensitize  150  CA  members  on  DRR/HFA;  advocate  adoption  of  national  strategy  by  CA;  convention of vulnerable people on ISDR day, celebration of EQSD, ISDR day etc; training to  30 journalists on DRR; grassroots dissemination of information related to DRR/HFA    Result 3:  Target stakeholders demonstrate increased awareness on disaster preparedness methods at family  and community level    Activities to Achieve Result 3:  1. Participatory Vulnerability Analysis  Conduct PVA through 30 field applications and mapping at various stages in project areas  2. Mass awareness raising   Print and  distribute IEC materials  like posters, brochures, leaflets etc.; broadcast messages  through  FM  radio;  organize  60  street  theatre  shows  and  60  DRR  video  shows  in  the  community  Result 4:  Small  scale  mitigation  measures  with  government  and  local  support  contribute  to  vulnerability  reduction    Activities to achieve Result 4:  Retrofitting work: Retrofit 2 school buildings and one hospital building as pilot initiatives  Embankment protection in two locations (bio‐dyke, green belt) of approximately 200 mtrs  Elevate 20 handmpumps in two districts to make them disaster proof    Overall Objective of Mid Term Review (MTR)    The broad objective of the MTR is to study and analyse the project progress towards achieving the  set  objectives  and  recommend  ways  and  methods  of  improving  quality  and  efficiency  of  project  implementation.    The specific purpose of the MTR were  • Study and analyse the project processes to measure the extent of its progress towards achieving  the set objectives and anticipated results including sustenance of the results of the project, (vis‐ a‐vis indicators mentioned in the log frame).  • Analyse the relevance of the process and approach of the project to achieve set objectives and  anticipated results  • Study and analyse the project management and monitoring tools and its relevance in achieving  the set objectives and anticipated results  • Recommend course corrections, in terms of processes and actions so as to improve the overall  quality and efficiency of the project to achieve the set objectives and anticipated results  To analyse the project outcome in terms of empowerment, particularly with respect to building  capacities of women and other differentially vulnerable groups to participate and contribute to  the decision making process  To review the management and implementation processes adopted by the project   5
  • To analyse the level of ownership and receptiveness of the communities and their participation  in the implementation processes  To  review  and  analyse  the  contribution  of  the  project  to  ActionAid  Nepal’s  core  strategy  on  human  security,  emergency  and  disaster  management  in  line  with  the  revised  CSP  III  and  to  ActionAid International HST/IECT strategy  To  review  and  suggest  some  of  the  key  learning  and  practises  that  have  potential  for  wider  application and replication in similar approaches elsewhere, if any    Methodology     In  order  to  develop  ownership  and  ensure  the  involvement  and  interest  of  the  stakeholders  for  sustainable  changes  and  future  developments,  the  assessment  was  conducted  in  a  participatory  way, involving AA team along with representative from the ActionAid Australia and the Government  of  Nepal,  project  team,  partner  staff,  consultants,  beneficiaries,  and  other  people  or  institutions  directly or indirectly involved in development and implementation of the project.     The following methods were used:    » Review  of  the  project  documentation:  A  number  reports,  original  proposal  as  well  as  interim  reports were reviewed. Various periodic communication bulletins and reports were available.  These sources will be a base on the reference of the project, which helped the evaluator(s) to  understand the project as well as summarise the achievements.  » Interview  of  the  key  staffs  of  the  projects:  Individual  interview  of  ActionAid  Nepal,  partners,  government officials and other key stakeholders involved.  » Participatory  group  exercise:  participatory  group  exercise  with  the  project’s  key  stakeholders  (different  disaster  management  committees,  National  and  International  NGOs,  government  officials, DIPECHO partners in Nepal) to review achievements, approaches and potentials.  » Community  Assessment:  participatory  methodologies  e.g.  focus  group  discussion,  interview,  case studies and other tools were used community assessment.     The  Mid‐Term  Review  was  conducted  over  four  days.  The  team  visited  the  AAN  office  and  met  DIPECHO partners in Kathmandu, and met with partners and participating communities in Banke and  Sunsari districts. The team met 5 REFLECT circles and Disaster Management Committees, and visited  another  village  where  the  project  is  active.  Baseline  data  revealed  through  the  Participatory  Vulnerability  Analyses  (PVA)  and  Knowledge,  Attitude,  Practice  (KAP)  studies  conducted  at  project  outset were not reviewed. (It is understood that this information will be reviewed as part of the end  of  project  evaluation).  Given  time  constraints,  the  review  team  focused  on  assessing  broad  directions  without  conducting  a  formal  survey  or  collecting  qualitative  data.  Observations  are  therefore qualitative and generalised  from a relatively  small sample, and should be viewed in that  light.  The detailed MTR schedule is attached.    Mid Term Review Team    The MTR team consisted of the following members:  • Nahakul Thapa, National Coordinator of the DRR through Schools Project, ActionAid Nepal as the  Team Leader   • Grace Nicholas, Program Coordinator, ActionAid Australia  • Mr. Thir Bahadur GC, Under Secretary, Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of Nepal    The team was accompanied by the project team members to the field.  6
  • Executive Summary    The  over  all  implementation  of  the  DIPECHO  V  project,  co‐funded  by  AusAID,  is  on  track  and  contributing to the four expected results and then to the project objective. There are three levels of  distinct  achievements.  The  first  level  is  at  local  level  where  the  formation  of  REFLECT  circles  and  Disaster Management Committees with community based disaster preparedness plans has assisted  in  strengthening  communities  preparedness  for  future  disasters.  The  communities  are  being  mobilised through REFLECT, and Participatory Vulnerability Analyses (PVA).     These  processes  have  assisted  communities  to  analyze  their  vulnerabilities  and  take  pro  active  actions  to  mitigate  the  impacts  of  disasters  on  them.  Thus  the  grass  root  institutions  have  been  developed  and  strengthened.  The  various  training  activities  like  Community  Based  Disaster  Risk  Reduction (CBDRR), First Aid and Light Search and Rescue (LSR) has contributed to strengthening the  capacities  of  local  communities  visited.  As  a  result  of  the  capacities  built  up  by  the  project,  the  communities  are  now  more  confident  that  they  have  reduced  the  risks  of  disasters  at  community  level.  As  per  the  project  plan,  DMCs  are  supposed  to  be  equipped  with  disaster  management  materials and community fund. The community funds have been functional in two communities. The  introduction  of  siren,  elevating  low  lying  roads  and  building  bio  dykes  is  also  a  strategy  to  make  communities safer. The level of awareness about disaster among communities is very high in almost  all  communities.  The  household  level  preparedness  is  evident  with  people  found  placing  their  valuables at a higher and safe place inside homes. Important documents, jewels, and cash are kept  safe in a box and put in second story (platform). The MTR did not assess baseline data and a certain  level of pre‐existing awareness is to be expected since the same disasters recur annually, however  several  community  groups  interviewed  stated  that  they  believed  the  project  had  assisted  in  strengthening their awareness and preparedness.    Similarly  the  construction  of  culverts,  schools,  and  raised  hand  pumps  are  strategies  to  make  the  community safer. The introduction of fistful rice campaign has enabled two of the communities to  create an emergency fund. Other villages visited were yet to start the campaign.     Both women and men from participating communities reported that women have been more vocal,  have  started  coming  out  of  their  homes  to  attend  the  discussions  around  social  issues  including  disasters.  The  REFLECT  circles  and  other  training  activities  has  contributed  to  this  change.  Now  women in the communities feel that unlike earlier their male partners have been more supportive to  them. There is availability of trained volunteers at community level and these trained volunteers are  willing to offer any help to the victims of any disaster any time voluntarily.     The  Disaster  Management  Committees  (DMC)  have  started  accessing  and  mobilizing  local  government  funds  and  are  having  better  linkages  with  local  government  structure  which  further  strengthens the possibility of these DMC’s sustainability and better collaborative initiatives in future  after the project phases out.     There are a few concerns at local level. Though the communities have started to promote household  level preparedness, like using safe and higher place to store their valuables, raise the plinth of their  food grain storage so they can make both their valuables and food grain safe from flood, but  there  are still concerns about translating the knowledge and skills of communities into actions.     Compared  to  the  level  of  knowledge  and  awareness  on  and  around  disaster  among  communities,  very few actions have been taken. For example the community people know that the need to go to a  higher  and  safe  place  during  flood  but  they  have  not  identified  such  safe  place  and  located  it.  Likewise  there  are  some  concerns  regarding  social  mobilization  especially  in  Banke  district.  One  7
  • community in particular was found divided. It was felt that the lack of full participation of all sections  of the society during vulnerability analysis and planning process has resulted in such conflicts. This  conflict needs to be resolved immediately taking take extra measures.        The second level of achievement is evident at district level. It is more with the partners’ level. The  partners are capable of implementing the project with effective social mobilization. The partners are  visible at district level, their involvement and initiatives are well recognised by the government and  other non governmental organisation.     The  partners  are  bridging  between  our  locally  formed  institutions  like  the  DMCs  and  district  level  government and other networks. Because of the various disaster risk reduction initiatives carried out  by  the  disaster management committees  formed under the DIPECHO‐AusAID project,  the partners  are showcasing the examples and making their presence at district level DRR initiative stronger and  vibrant. The DIPECHO‐AusAID partner in Sunsari is either leading district level initiatives or becoming  integral  part  of  it.  These  partners  have  been  influential  in  the  process  of  decision‐making  for  the  district level DRR initiatives. For example the proposal of UPCA in Sunsari that the victims of disaster  be in the District Disaster Relief Committee has been positively taken by the District Administration  Office which in fact leads the committee.    Third  level  of  achievement  can  be  seen  at  national  level.  The  project  seems  quite  successful  in  advocating for the introduction, development and endorsement of DRR legal frameworks at national  level.  For  this  the  project  has  adopted  three  clear  strategies.  The  first  is  by  mobilizing  media.  Co‐ Action  Nepal  as  national  partner  is  efficiently  carrying  out  the  project  activities  to  mobilise  media  and was able to demonstrate a number of relevant articles published in print and electronic media.  This strategy can be assumed to be helping to bring the issues of disaster in Nepal into the attention  of public and the government; however the project did not have the opportunity to assess the level  of  public  awareness  directly.  The  project  then  has  another  strategy  of  sensitizing  policy  makers  (constituent  assembly  members  themselves)  on  the  need,  and  urgency  of  having  legislative  frameworks on disasters in place.     The  third  strategy  is  redesigning  conventional  ways  of  celebrating  events  so  as  to  draw  mass  attention and pressurise the government to have adequate DRR policies in place in Nepal as part of  its  commitment  to  the  Hyugo  Framework  Agreement  (HFA).  The  celebration  of  International  S  Disaster Reduction (ISDR) day in 2009 was a mega event having its impacts both on the government  and,  the  UN  and  other  agencies.  Following  ISDR  Day,  which  was  attended  by  a  large  number  of  people  representing  grass  root  disaster  victims,  disaster  networks,  professional,  journalists,  government and other agencies, the Government made a further commitment to endorse the draft  Disaster Management Act and policy? While it is difficult to assess the link directly, and the MTR did  not  have  the  opportunity  to  interview  involved  officials,  it  is  likely  that  this  activity  strongly  influenced the Government’s action.   8
  •   Major Findings / Observations of the Review    Project Result 1:  Alignment with CSP  Capacity of target communities  The Result 1 of the project activities thereof aligns with the  is enhanced to reduce impact of  Strategic approach of “Enabling and Empowering Rights  disasters through local collective  Holders” and contributes to achieving the thematic strategy  actions  on Women’s Rights and Rights of vulnerable groups.    Community level DRR structures / institutions in place and trained    After  the  communities  identified  the  local  hazards  and  risks  associated  with  it  through  discussions in REFLECT circles and participatory vulnerability analyses, community based disaster  risk reduction committees have been  formed and  operational in the 5 areas visited during the  MTR. Partner records further indicate that 18 REFLECT circles and DMCs have been established.  The  districts  where  the  MTR  was  carried  out  share  common  hazards  and  risks.  These  hazards  include floods, inundation, fire, cold snap, heat waves and windstorms, whereas earthquake is a  common hazard across the country.      Communities  informed  the  MTR  that  Disaster  Management  Committees  have  actively  been  involved  in  reducing  risks  posed  to  them  as  a  result  of  disasters.  Despite  being  involved  in  community  level  disaster  preparedness,  mitigation  and  risk  reduction  initiatives,  Disaster  Management Committees are also taken as a  forum for knowledge sharing in preparedness of  disasters.  People  are  happy  after  the  implementation  of  the  project  as  they  have  been  now  more informed about the preparedness, early warning systems like the use of siren. These DMCs  were found named in local languages like Musibat Vyabastahpan Samiti that has contributed to  the better understanding of communities and own it further.     These local structures were found institutionalised through it regularised meetings, linkages with  local government agencies and having a pool of trained volunteers. These disaster management  committees have created emergency funds. For this, fistful of rice campaign is also contributing  to the accumulation of such funds. In one of the villages visited, Sunsari, Ward # 9, the system  was fully developed and functioning well. Once the storage of food grain is full, it is converted  into  cash  and  deposited  in  the  community  bank  account  and  the  campaign  restarts  to  fill  the  storage again.     Progress  in  some  areas  was  observed  to  be  a  little  uneven.  While  the  FFR  campaign  was  reported to have started in two villages (Sunsari Ward 9 and ….), in others this was not the case.  Narsing 4 (madrasa) community leaders reported some hesitancy in starting the FFR for disaster  response,  as  the  community  already  contributed  funds  for  a  shared  account  and  they  were  concerned  about  a  double‐burden  for  the  community.  In  another  village  in  Banke  (Bhojpur),  divisions in the community undermined confidence in the possibility of a shared account being  managed appropriately. This is likely to affect the community’s commitment to contributing to  the fund.    Communities  resilience  to  disaster  increased  through  community  level  preparedness  and  mitigation    The  communities  were  found  better  prepared  for  future  disasters.  The  local  disaster  risk  reduction  initiatives  led  by  the  disaster  preparedness  committees  in  full  involvement  of  local  people has substantially reduced the risks. The communities collect food grains as decided either  9
  • in  REFLECT  circles  or  in  disaster  management  committees  to  support  for  the  families  to  be  affected in future disasters. The communities were found to have developed and adopted safer  cultures  also at  household  levels.  The  communities  that fall pray to recurring  flood  inundation  have raised their household food storage so as to keep food grain safe from water logging. Apart  from  keeping  the  food  grain  storage  safe,  the  communities  were  also  found  to  have  their  important documents and assets like the citizenship certificate, land possession certificate, cash  and jewelleries placed in a high place in a strong boxes provided by the project..     The communities have raised the plinth of tube wells so they can avoid drinking contaminated  water during monsoon.  Unlike earlier the communities believe that they would not be affected  by  the  water  borne  diseases  as  they  will  have  access  to  uncontaminated  drinking  water  even  during water inundation in monsoon. The availability of trained volunteers in different life skills  like CBDRR, first aid, fire fighting, light search and rescue has made the communities more safer.  These  volunteers  were  found  very  enthusiastic  and  ready  to  offer  their  help  voluntarily.  In  Sunsari, the Madarsa / school has been made safer. The madarsa in Narsing‐ 4 sunsari has now  been safer as it has been built with a raised plinth, and the way to it has been mande safer from  constricting a culvert that has ensured smooth access to the school. This initiative has reduced  the  risks  to  the  students  from  flood  on  the  one  hand  and  the  community  can  take  immediate  shelter during any emergency in future. The community people are well aware of then benefit of  making school safer.     REFLECT really an effective tool to empower community and  help them take pro active  measures‐ visible women empowerment    REFLECT circles were found to have been very important tool for mobilizing community people  and for their empowerment. The introduction of these circles in the communities has provided a  common  forum  for  community  people  to  discuss  about  their  common  concerns,  seek  for  solutions to these concerns collectively and translate it into actions. REFLECT circles are taken as  the first opportunity by women for representing themselves at community level.    A Reflect center was formed in Ithari municipality ward no. 7 under DIPECHO IV project has been under  refresher activities in the current project. The area was prone to flood inundation, windstorm and other  local  hazards.  Mitigation  measure  like  culvert  with  safe  exit  was  made  during  the  project  in  collaboration  with  municipality  office.  More  importantly  awareness  raising  activities  were  organized  through Reflect sessions. Reflect participants became aware that unless & until there houses are built  flood & other local hazard proof; it was difficult to build safer communities. They influenced peoples in  the community to build new or renovate old house with raised plinth level. Now there are more than 10  houses with such structures. Reflect centers are continuously campaigning on it.  It may be one of the  best examples on impact of DIPECHO Project.  ‐Shared by Kamali Chaudhary, REFLECT facilitator, Ithari, 2009   Every  member  of  the  circles  believes  that  he/she  has  found  a  space  to  voice  their  concerns.  After  the  REFLECT  circles  people  have  started  discussing  about  their  social  issues,  felt   empowered together to voice their concerns, access government resources and unity as a social  unity. In Babiya VDC of Sunsari district the REFLECT circle was found to have driven away people  from  other  places  extracting  sand  from  the  river  near  by  the  village  which  could  resulted  in  erosion  and  the  river  change  it  course  towards  the  village.  They  are  proud  they  could  do  it  together  for  keeping  their  villages  safer  from  the  risks.  The  women  who  earlier  would  remain  inside  the  four  walls  of  their  house  now  have  been  active  part  of  disaster  risk  reduction  10
  • initiatives  as  a  result  of  their  involvement  in  REFLECT  cirles.  Women  feel  that  they  have  now  been more vocal, unlike earlier they are not to speak out their minds with their male partners.  Male  partners  have  also  been  more  supportive  towards  them.  Now  men  allow  women  to  join  REFLECT classes as they know their female partners are learning and being empowered. People  believe  hat  discussion  on  REFLECT  are  really  useful  and  they  pay  attention  to  the  disabled,  elderly  people,  and  lactating  mothers  as  special  needs  groups  in  any  emergency.  Community  people  have  recorded  the  number  of  such  people  and  located  them  so  these  groups  can  be  given special treatment during and disasters in future. The participation of women can be seen  meaningful  as  they  feel  they  have  been  able  to  influence  the  decisions  taken  in  various  committees like the DMC or the REFLECT that affect their lives. They have been able to have a  female  signatory  to  the  bank  account  opened  by  the  Disaster  Management  Committees  in  Sunsari. The women have been treasurer in disaster management committees.    Teachers/ students trained on CBDRR in Banke demonstrated school safety awareness;  carrying messages home    Apart from the community based approach, the approach of going to the communities through  schools was also seen equally important in Banke. Teachers and students who were trained on  community based disaster risk reduction have immensely helped them increase their capacities  in  analyzing  local  hazards  and  risks  associated  to  it.  This  training  has  also  helped  them  understand the concept of disaster risk management cycle. The students who were trained on  disaster  risk  management  in  schools  are  carrying  messages  on  disaster  education  to  their  parents back home. Students were conversant on local disaster issues the impacts of disaster on  them. They also knew how to prepare for future disaster impacts on school and their study. The  school  family  both  the  students,  teachers  and  school  management  committees  have  realized  that making schools safer can serve dual role first as protecting students and teachers during any  disasters while in schools, and other school offering  temporary shelter for communities in case  of  any  emergencies  and  displacement.  The  realization  that  making  school  safer  is  to  protect  a  generation, as a school houses hundreds of students at the same time. The culture of safety can  also be cultivated among students making next generation more prepared for any disasters.     Women’s participation in community decision‐making was visible    During  the  discussions  with  the  women  it  was  found  that  the  project  is  contributing  towards  promoting women’s participation not only at local or community level but also at district level.  The  REFLECT  circles,  Participatory  Vulnerability  Analysis  and  different  training  activities  have  empowered  women,  compared  to  their  baseline  situation.  There  are  almost  fifty  percent  or  more  women  in  the  REFLECT  circles.  There  is  descent  representation  of  women  in  Disaster  Management  Committees.  The  women  not  only  have  been  able  to  have  their  presence  in  different forums and fora but also were found to have been able to influence the decisions they  way  they  want.. Also was found  that there  are  women  co signatory to the bank  account.. The  meeting with the women in Gangapur in Banke revealed that women have started approaching  local  village  development  office  inquiring  about  existing  provisions  at  village  level  for  woment  development.  The  women  group  in  Banke  has  been  able  to  access  Village  Development  Fund  and  use  it  for  filling  soil  on  the  low  lying  road.  The  women  group  and  Disaster  management  committee  of  Newajigaon,  Gangapur  was  able  to  get  Rs.  40000.00  for  this  road  improvement  work.          11
  • Project is succeeding with ‘difficult’ communities     The  project  has  been  successful  in  reaching  most  vulnerable  communities,  building  their  capacities  and  better  preparing  communities  for  withstanding  any  disasters  in  future.  The  communities it has been successfully working like the Babiya Village Develoment Committee or  Gangapur VDC in Banke where other agencies generally do not prefer to go there as they feel  this community is very difficult to work with, or is very difficult for the social mobilization part. It  was repeatedly mentioned by the youths of the village. And the youths are now proud that they  have been successful in promoting community based preparedness.     Project Result 1:  Alignment with CSP  Enabling environment created  The Result 2 of the project activities thereof aligns with the  through appropriate DRR  Strategic approach of “Engagement for pro‐rights policies  policies and plans  and governance” and contributes to achieving the overall  organizational strategy of ActionAid in Nepal    Local partners found to be active, proud, recognized in community and at district level     The  local  partners  of  this  project  are  very  active,  and  are  recognized  in  the  communities.  Communities are very much appreciative of partners and their roles in mobilizing communities,  helping  them  in  their  community  based  disaster  preparedness  initiatives.  The  visible  relation  between partners especially in Sunsari seems that the communities and the partners will remain  in  touch  for  future  joint  initiatives  around  disaster  issues  beyond  the  current  project.  An  example of it is that the Disaster Management Committees from previous DIPECHO project are  in constant coordination with partner and the same partner is with this project. The government  and  other  non  governmental  agencies  involved  in  the  areas  of  disaster  risk  management  initiatives  at  diastrict  level  are  well  recognizing  DIPECHO  project  partner’s  work  in  the  district.  These partners are strongly present in different disaster management networks in the district. As  the  government  and  other  agencies  are  positive  towards  these  partners,these  partners  were  found at a position  from where they can influence the decisions  taken at district level for the  disaster risk reduction initiatives. The local partner is Sunsari is putting its effort to form a district  level network of disaster management committees. It is also advocating for the representation  of disaster victims in the District Disaster Relief Committee (DDRC) in Sunsari. The DDRC which is  chaired  and  led  by  the  Chief  District  Officer  is  positive  towards  this  proposal.  The  district  administration  office  and  district  development  office  representatives  during  our  meeting  with  them  told  the  review  team  that  the  disaster  management  committees  and  other  structured  formed  at  local  community  level  under  the  DIPECHO  V  project  are  treated  as  the  source  for  collecting local information.     National partner is capable of mobilizing media and policy advocacy at national level going  right way     Co‐Action Nepal, the national partner of the DIPECHO V project is active in the initiatives taken  up by the project at national level for the policy advocacy. The mobilization of media especially  the  appearance of news and articles on disaster issues in Nepal and television programs have  contributed to further draw the attention of the general public for their awareness and of the  policy  makers  to  further  work  on  having  adequate  legislative  instruments  like  the  Disaster  Mangement Act, Policy and Sectoral Strategies in place at national level. Though the drafting of  National Disaster Management Act, Policy and Strategy was done before the commencement of  this  project,  the  project  now  has  been  toiling  hard  to  have  these  documents  endorsed  by  the  parliament  in Nepal. As  a result of the  policy advocacy initiatives taken up at national  level by  12
  • the  project,  the  council  of  minister  has  endorsed  the  disaster  management  strategy  in  Nepal.  DIPECHO  V  project  is  strategic  in  influencing  national  policies.  The  sensitization  of  constituent  assembly  members  who  are  also  legislatives  has  substantially  contributed  for  the  policy  advocacy. The draft act and policy that are yet to be endorsed by the parliament are on way to  be tabled in the parliament.. This is also the result of the sensitization of parliamentarians on the  urgency of disaster management act and policies in place in Nepal keeping in view the recurring  damages  and  loss  from  the  disasters  in  Nepal.  The  project  has  also  made  a  DRR  tool  kit  and  shared widely throughout the country especially the government which has further contributed  to generate pressure on the government to have the draft act and policies endorsed as soon as  possible. Another strategic way of gathering additional support for the policy advocacy work at  national  level  was  the  event  organized  to  celebrate  ISDR  day  in  2009.  This  day  was  not  celebrated  just  in  a  conventional  way  but  was  utilized  tactfully  for  the  mass  awareness  and  policy advocacy. The ever biggest event gathering people right from the community people who  are  facing  disaster  impact  to  the  professional,  policy  makers,  international  agencies  to  the  government. A ten points demand on and around the urgency of disaster management issues in  Nepal  was  presented  to  the  President.  And  this  was  led  by  the  people  coming  from  the  grass  roots demanding for their rights to be protected.     DIPECHO partners strongly appreciate AAN leadership in advocacy and community awareness  as well as AAN’s open approach to involving stakeholders    ActionAid  Nepal  is  taking  lead  among  DIPECHO  partners  in  Nepal.  A  meeting  held  with  other  DIPECHO partners to discuss about ActionAid Nepal’s role through the project agreed that the  coordination mechanism that has been developed is a good cross learning forum. Participants of  the meeting said that ActionAid Nepal is efficiently coordinating all DIPECHO partners and taking  lead  in  different  national  level  disaster  risk  reduction  initiatives.  ActionAid  Nepal  is  taking  on  board all partners and all partners feel proud of being part of the innovative initiatives taken up  by ActionAid Nepal. ActionAid Nepal comes up with new ideas and initiatives and the DIPECHO  partners.  For  example  the  celebration  of  2009  ISDR  day  was  originally  designed  by  ActionAid  DIPECHO project which was successful in gathering thousands of people, drawing mass attention  to the issue of disaster in Nepal and presenting ten points demand to the government through  the President of Nepal. This event was really resulted in having further government commitment  to work towards the disaster risk management in Nepal along with further commitment for the  endorsement  of  the  draft  disaster  management  act,  policies  and  strategies.  DIPECHO  partners  believe that together with ActionAid DIPECHO project they have been more visible, their voices  have  been stronger and have been able to influence national plan, policies and programmes on  and around disaster in Nepal. In this regard, these partners have had strategic engagement with  other DRR networks and agencies in Nepal.  Other partners feel comfortable to jointly work with  ActionAid Nepal because in order to be part of any joint initiatives any p artner can  have space  to  chip  in  even  if  they  are  not  in  a  position  to  share  resources  for  the  initiatives.  The  coordination mechanism forum has also provided a space for partners to learn from each other  and replicate the best practices in their respective intervention areas.    Project Result 1:  Alignment with CSP  Target stakeholders demonstrate  The Result 3 of the project activities thereof aligns  increased awareness on disaster  with the Strategic approach of “Mass  preparedness methods at family and  conscientisation on Rights” and contributes to  community level Enabling environment  achieving the thematic strategy on Right to  created through appropriate DRR policies  Education and Women’s Rights  and plans    13
  • The level of awareness among community people  around local hazards and the preparedness  is high    The  level  of  awareness  among  community  people  on  and  around  disasters  was  found  very  satisfactory.  Whereas  community  has  been  living  with  disasters  for  long,  the  discussions  with  direct  beneficiaries  made  clear  their  overall  understanding,  particularly  on  preparedness  has  improved  through  the  project.  This  raise  of  awareness  levels  resulted  from  the  discussion,  sharing  and  learning  in  REFLECT  centres,  and  various  training  and  sensitization  activities  undertaken  at  community  level.  People  are  conversant  about  local  hazards  and  the  risks  they  might  face  and  also  how  to  prepare  for  facing  the  disasters  in  future.  When  asked  what  they  would do in an earthquake, most of the people replied that they would go under a table, hold it  tight until the quake stops and leave the place.  In Narsing 4 Tapara Tole the community group  reported that they learned about this  through a project street drama. Communities also know  they have to identify safe exit and locate a safe areas so people can be use the safe route and go  to the safe place during floods.     Street drama / IEC materials contribute to increase disaster awareness    The street drama demonstrations on various themes have been a strong medium to disseminate  disaster education to the wider communities.  The community people stated that they received  messages related to earthquake and flood through the demonstrations of street dramas. As the  dramas were in their own local languages the intended messages to the target population was  stronger. Likewise the use of various IEC materials  like posters, pamphlets,   wall paintings  and  flip charts are also helping communities to understand disaster issues and preparedness for it. In  Banke, When asked on a poster message, women of REFLECT circles could tell what the message  was  about.  The  street  dramas  were  found  very  effective  to  create  awareness  among  illiterate  communities.  The  use  of  audio  visuals  on  and  around  disasters  was  also  found  very  effective  means of disseminating disaster education among community people.      Project Result 4:  Alignment with CSP Small scale mitigation measures  The Result 4 of the project activities thereof aligns with the  with government and local  Strategic approach of “Enabling and Empowering Rights  support contribute to  Holders” and contributes to achieving the thematic strategy  vulnerability reduction  on Women’s Rights and Rights of vulnerable groups.    The construction of bio dyke will protect the target communities     The construction of bio dyke in Gangapur, Banke is a large scale disaster mitigation measure and  it certainly is going to protect whole target communities from the floods and its impact on the  local  communities.  This  bio  dyke  is  useful  in  change  the  course  of  flooding  water  making  communities  safe.    The  critical  concern  here  is  that  though  this  dyke  will  protect  the  target  communities of one side but there is no assessment of impacts of this dyke people living on the  other side.     Project Management    The  overall  project  management  is  efficient  and  the  current  project  structure  is  functional  to  the  level of satisfaction. The monitoring and supervision is taking place timely and donor requirements  relating  to  the  financial  as  well  as  narrative  reports  are  prepared  as  per  the  recommended  donor  format  and  guidelines.  Partners  are  satisfied  with  the  amount  of  support  they  are  getting  from  project staffs. Project partners have capacities to implement the project activities at local level. The  14
  • documentation part of the project is being taken seriously.  The partners and communities are well  aware  of  the  budgets,  and  planning  system  which  has  contributed  to  the  maintenance  of  transparency and accountability.    Sustainability:    The project locations in DIPECHO V project has been selected based on the long term presence of  ActionAid  which  augurs  well  for  the  sustainability  of  the  results  generated  by  the  project.  The  project  presence  in  Banke  is  particularly  interesting,  as  ActionAid  has  just  initiated  a  long  term  development  project  in  the  area,  which  means  that  the  development  project  defacto  starts  with  initiation  to  risk  reduction.  This  will  help  the  communities  ingrain  the  essence  of  risk  reduction  within their mindsets, translating any future development work well integrated with DRR. This is a  classic case of DRR mainstreaming, the ultimate mission of any risk reduction initiative at community  level. However, there is a need for strengthening coordination and collaboration between the long  term development works of ActionAid with that of the project. At an organizational level, the team  has found that there is an increasing focus in integrating projects into development works, which is  the right step at the policy level to ensure that project strengths are utilized to boost development  works and projects contribute to long term development plans. Vice versa, this also helps the project  to develop its own exit strategy without worrying about sustainability of the results from the project.    The  overall  project  objective,  expected  results  and  activities  planned  are  contributing  the  Country  Strategy  Paper  III  (Revised)  of  ActionAid  Nepal  and  is  within  the  overall  framework  of  the  Human  Security  Policy  of  ActionAid  International.  The  project  is  contributing  not  only  directly  to  the  communities  it  targets,  but  also  in  terms  o  crucial  organizational  knowledge  and  know  how  on  disaster risk reduction initiatives.     Donor Compliance    The  MTR  team  has  found  that  the  project  is  implemented  in  accordance  with  the  contractual  agreement with the donors (European Commission Humanitarian Aid department and AusAID).    Coordination within the organization    The  project  is  not  being  managed  as  a  stand  along  project.  Attempt  has  been  made  by  the  management  of  AAN  to  integrate  the  project  within  the  overall  program  framework  of  the  organization in line with the Country Strategy Paper III (Revised). The MTR team found increased as  well  as  well  informed  involvement  of  Regional  Resource  Centres  (Eastern  and  Western  regions)  in  project  management.  Whereas  this  method  of  management  is  logical  in  organizational  view  point  and should be the approach for long term sustainability and value addition to development works,  the  team  found  that  the  coordination  and  collaboration  modalities  have  not  been  worked  out  totally,  thereby  creating  certain  grey  areas  in  information  flow  and  authorization.  MTR  team  understands that ActionAid Nepal is aware of this and are working on the systems to make project  management and integral component of overall program management.  15
  •     Recommendations    1. Continue building on links between VDCs, DDCs and DMCs    Though  the  Disaster  Management  Committees  are  with  the  support  from  partner  having  linkages  with  local  government  agencies  and  other  Disaster  Risk  Reduction  Networks,  additional  support  is  needed  for  the  Disaster  Management  Committees  to  establish,  promote  and  strengthen  their  relation  with  other  agencies.  As  the  project  is  half  way  now,  this  effort  is  required  to  ensure  that  local  DRR  structure  formed  during  the  project  continue  working  with  other  agencies  beyond  the  project  inputs.  There  is  a  need  for  a  development  of  a  institutionalized  mechanism  in  which  the  disaster  management  committees  are  accepted  as  integral  part  of  district  level  networks  and  the  disaster  management  committees  feel  a  sense  of  belonging  to a  permanent  kind  of  network  even  after  the  project  phases  out.    As  most  of  the  government  agencies  are  very  much  positive  and  appreciative of both the local disaster management committees and local partners, the possibility of  having better linkages with them is very high.     2. Select  DMC  members  from  REFLECT  circles  after  initial  DRR  discussions  to  ensure  better  understanding/commitment (Sunsari vs. Banke)    It was found that in some places DMC’s were formed before the REFLECT started and in some places  REFLECT  circles  started  first  then  DMCs  were  formed.  It  is  recommended  that  REFLECT  circles  are  started  first,  then the  communities  start discussing about  local disasters  and  risks, understand  the  concept  of  community  based  disaster  preparedness.  Once  the  participants  of  the  circles  are  adequately knowledgeable about disasters and their roles in it only then DMCs be formed.     3. Emergency  Fund  utilisation  guidelines  should  be  provided  by  the  project  to  avoid  potential  community conflict    Most of the Disaster Management Committees have created emergency fund which is a very good  practice and it must be promoted and replicated in other area where it is absent. The communities  have  collected  fund  and  deposited  in  the  bank  and  general  understanding  among  community  members is that this fund will be used to support the victims of future disasters. There seems lack of  clarity as to how the fund will be channeled, who will get how much and how it will be replaced. This  fund has not been used so far so the probable complications for its utilization have not been felt. But  it  is  sure  that  there  will  be  problems  when  this  fund  used  in  future.  In  order  to  avoid  it,  a  clear  guideline as to how this fund will be operated needs to be developed and operationalised. DIPECHO  project  need  not  to  develop  a  new  guideline  as  there  are  other  DMCs  like  in  the  Disaster  Risk  Reduction through Schools Project areas have developed the guideline. DIPECHO project simple can  replicate it.    4. In  divided  communities,  take  extra  measures  to  ensure  all  groups  are  included  in  decision‐ making  process  and  structures  from  the  beginning  (Bhojpur).  Give  additional  support  and  emphasis in the overall processes in Banke area    In Banke, on the social mobilization part, the process adopted during the analysis of vulnerabilities  seems that the representation in the process was not fully participatory. Those who did not take part  in the initial process are not supportive to the initiatives taken by other. Thus the community seems  to have split. This is causing problems. The community is divided. In order to avoid such situation in  future, project needs to ensure that there is full participation representing all sections of the society.  In Banke (Bhojpur), it is now necessary to take extra measures to minimize the differences between  16
  • the two groups immediately; otherwise the situation might be worse. The construction of bio dye in  Bhojpura,  Banke  might  create  problems  to  the  people  living  on  the  other  side  of  the  dye.  An  assessment of the impacts of the dyke needs to be carried out immediately and take measures not  to  let  the  situation  get  worse.  And  for  new  dykes  an  environmental  /  impact  assessment  must  be  conducted  prior  to  the  construction.  The  project  management  along  with  the  regional  resource  centre should give additional emphasis to the overall processes in Banke operations.    5. Strengthen efforts to assist community to translate learning and awareness into specific action  plans (identification of safe locations for emergencies; focal point person for activating sirens  etc)    In a short span of time the project seems to have been able to create awareness on disaster among  community people is really appreciable. Community people have the knowledge and information on  what to do in an emergency. For example the women of Babiya in Sunsari know that they have to go  to  an  elevated  land  during  flooding  and  that  location  should  be  known  to  all  and  safe.  But  this  knowledge has not been translated into action. No such safe place has been identified, and located  yet.  The  review  team  strongly  recommends  help  the  communities  to  translate  their  learning  into  actions.  The  communities  know  that  their  disaster  preparedness  plans  must  treat  women,  elderly,  disabled, and pregnant woman as special groups having special needs more during any emergency  but there are very few cases of reflecting these special needs in their preparedness plan.     6. Strengthen  gender  and  disability‐inclusive  planning  in  community  initiatives  (handrails  on  raised water pumps; pregnant women/ nursing mothers)    There is  a need for a  inclusive kind of planning so as to address  the special needs of the disabled,  women,  children  and  nursing  mothers.  The  hand  pumps  have  been  raised.  This  allows  community  people  to  have  access  to  water  even  during  flooding  because  the  pumps  have  been  raised  to  the  level  above  which  the  flood  water  generally  does  not  go.  But  if  a  disabled  is  to  fetch  water  from  these pumps they can not reach up to the pump as there are no handrails to support them. This is  only  an  example.  All  of  our  initiatives  have  to  seriously  take  into  account  the  issues  of  inclusive  planning addressing the issues of gender and disabilities.  .  7. The construction of school and retrofitting should start immediately    In Bojpur of Banke, there is a plan to retrofit a school building. In this particular area the community  itself  is  divided  over  the  construction  of  the  bio  dyke  and  other  social  issues.  There  is  a  need  for  building  a  consensus  among  community  people  and  start  the  retrofitting  of  the  school  building  immediately.      8. Request  partners  to  undertake  strict  technical  and  quality  monitoring  of  construction  works  (schools, pumps etc)    Though  the  communities  are  constructing  water  pumps,  schools  and  culverts  as  part  of  their  preparedness for future disaster, it is very difficult to ensure the quality of construction works. There  is  lack  of  technical  as  well  as  quality  monitoring  mechanism  from  the  project.  It  is  therefore  necessary to have a technical as well as quality inspection of the structures constructed and ensure  that future construction works will have the technical and quality insurance mechanism inbuilt in the  planning process and it is implemented strictly.         17
  •   ANNEX  ERMS OF REFERENCE   Mid Term Review of DIPECHO V Project implemented by ActionAid in Nepal      Project Title:  Surakshit Samudaya II: Building Community Resilience to disaster    Donor:  European  Commission  Humanitarian  Aid  department  &  Australian  Government ‐ AusAid    Implementing Partner:  ActionAid (in Nepal)    Reviewers:  To be led by AAI IECT and AAA    Suggested Duration:  9 days including planning, travel, field visits and report writing    Suggested Period:  First week of March, 2010    Background    ActionAid Nepal has received funding support from European Commission through its Humanitarian  Aid  department  (under  DIPECHO  V  Action  Plan  for  South  Asia)  to  implement  a  15  month  project  titled  “Surakshit  Samudaya  II:  Building  Disaster  Resilient  Communities,  Nepal”.  The  project  will  be  implemented in three districts of Nepal (Banke, Sunsari and Udayapur) in association with AAN local  partners,  directly  covering  nearly  13,000  people  in  7  municipal  and  5  village  development  committees. This includes refresher activities in 8 wards covered under the DIPECHO IV project. The  project  is  co‐financed  by  Australian  Government  –  AUSAID.  ActionAid  Nepal  is  implementing  DIPECHO project for consecutive third term now, having successfully completed two previous cycles  under DIPECHO III (2006‐07) as well as DIPECHO IV (2007‐09).    The specific objective of the project is to strengthen capacities of community and local institutions  for reducing impact of disasters and ensuring rights of disaster vulnerable people    The  key  components  of  the  project  includes  community  mobilization  and  strengthening  of  leadership  through  REFLECT  and  participatory  processes,  awareness  generation,  capacity  building,  skill  enhancement,  model  small  scale  mitigation  measures  and  networking,  to  be  implemented  based on principles and values of participation, transparency and accountability. National advocacy  on DRR/HFA is one of the key component of the project to ensure a sound DRR policy framework .    Project Objective    To  strengthen  capacities  of  community  and  local  institutions  for  reducing  impact  of  disasters  and  ensuring rights of disaster vulnerable people    Expected Results and Activities    Result 1:  Capacity  of  target  communities  is  enhanced  to  reduce  impact  of  disasters  through  collective  local  actions  18
  •   Activities to achieve Result 1:  1. To mobilize the community and strengthen grassroots institutions:   Formation  and  continuation  of  18  REFLECT  circles  and  DMCs  (8  old  from  DIPECHO  IV),  periodic  meetings  of  REFLECT  circles  and  DMCs;  development  of  community  level  action  plans on DRR  2. To train DMC members and community volunteers on preparedness and emergency response:  Training  on  CBDRR  for  160  people  including  DMC  members,  volunteers,  teachers  and  students;  training  to  150  volunteers  on  First  Aid,  Light  Search  and  Rescue  and  Emergency  Response;  Training  to  48  staff  and  volunteers  on  Participatory  Vulnerability  Analysis;  REFLECT ToT to 24 persons  3. To equip communities with disaster management materials, fund and Early Warning Systems:  Establish disaster rescue and relief kit including for food and water security during disasters;  establishment of emergency relief fund within the 10 target communities; training on EWS  to  60  volunteers;  workshop  on  EWS  with  different  stakeholders  for  60  persons  from  government and community and establishment of CBEWS with support from Practical Action    Result 2:  Enabling environment created through appropriate DRR policies and plans    Activities to achieve Result 2:  1. Form and strengthen networking of DMCs and stakeholders in district level  Form and strengthen district level networking of DMCs and stakeholders; organize network  meetings, exposure visit of DMC members to other areas within Nepal  2. Train government officers and NGO leaders on DRR/HFA  Training to 60 government officers and 60 NGOs on DRR/HFA  3. Advocate towards national policy framework on disaster risk reduction  Sensitize  150  CA  members  on  DRR/HFA;  advocate  adoption  of  national  strategy  by  CA;  convention of vulnerable people on ISDR day, celebration of EQSD, ISDR day etc; training to  30 journalists on DRR; grassroots dissemination of information related to DRR/HFA    Result 3:  Target stakeholders demonstrate increased awareness on disaster preparedness methods at family  and community level    Activities to Achieve Result 3:  1. Participatory Vulnerability Analysis  Conduct PVA through 30 field applications and mapping at various stages in project areas  2. Mass awareness raising   Print and  distribute IEC materials  like posters, brochures, leaflets etc.; broadcast messages  through  FM  radio;  organize  60  street  theatre  shows  and  60  DRR  video  shows  in  the  community    Result 4:  Small  scale  mitigation  measures  with  government  and  local  support  contribute  to  vulnerability  reduction    Activities to achieve Result 4:  Retrofitting work: Retrofit 2 school buildings and one hospital building as pilot initiatives  Embankment protection in two locations (bio‐dyke, green belt) of approximately 200 mtrs  Elevate 20 handmpumps in two districts to make them disaster proof  19
  •   Strategic Approach to Disaster Preparedness    • Make  disaster  preparedness  a  community‐based  approach,  ensuring  participation  and  ownership of the project  • REFLECT  to  be  used  as  the  key  participatory  process  and  tool  for  local  planning  and  implementation  • Raising  awareness  and  building  capacities  to  complement  community  mobilization  and  leadership development to effectively respond to disasters  • Developing  and  nurturing  a  pool  of  local  resource  persons  in  participatory  disaster  preparedness initiatives at the community level  • Building  partner  capacity  to  facilitate  disaster  risk  reduction  process  based  on  competence,  transparency and accountability  • Advocating rights of people affected or impacted by disasters or prone to disasters to lead a life  with dignity  • Advocating with national stakeholders for a sound policy environment in Nepal  • Collaboration  and  networking  among  various  stakeholders  at  local  and  national  level  to  be  strengthened  • Contribution to local and national efforts in building a disaster resilient Nepal    European Commission Humanitarian Aid department    The  European  Commission’s  Humanitarian  Aid  department  is  under  the  direct  responsibility  of  Commissioner Louis Michel. Since 1992, the Commission has funded relief to millions of victims of  natural and man‐made disasters outside the European Union.    Aid  is  channelled  impartially  to  the  affected  populations,  regardless  of  their  race,  ethnic  group,  religion,  gender,  age,  nationality  or  political  affiliation.  In  the  area  of  humanitarian  aid,  the  Commission works with 200 operational partners, including specialised United Nations agencies, the  Red  Cross/Crescent  movement  and  non‐governmental  organisations  (NGOs).  The  European  Commission is one of the biggest sources of humanitarian aid in the world. In 2006, it provided 671  million  euro  for  humanitarian  programmes.  This  does  not  include  the  aid  given  separately  by  the  EU’s 25 Member States. Support went to projects in 74 countries. The funds are spent on goods and  services  such  as  food,  clothing,  shelter,  medical  provisions,  water  supplies,  sanitation,  emergency  repairs and mine‐clearing.     The Commission also funds disaster preparedness and mitigation projects in regions prone to natural  catastrophes.  Under  department  of  Disaster  Preparedness  (DIPECHO),  the  European  Commission’s  Humanitarian Aid department has been supporting a number of disaster preparedness initiatives in  South Asia, including Nepal.     Australian Agency for International Development ‐ AusAid    AusAID  is  the  Australian  Government  agency  responsible  for  managing  Australia’s  overseas  aid  program.  The  objective  of  the  aid  program  is  to  assist  developing  countries  reduce  poverty  and  achieve sustainable development, in line with Austrailia’s national interest.    The  Australian  government  has  invested  in  a  range  of  disaster  risk  reduction  activities  at  the  regional, bilateral and community level in over 30 countries and is committed to strengthening the  capacity of partner countries to reduce disaster risks in line with Hyogo Framework for Action.    20
  • ActionAid    ActionAid  is  an  international  anti‐poverty  agency  working  in  over  40  countries,  taking  sides  with  poor  people  to  end  poverty  and  injustice  together.  Founded  in  the  United  Kingdom  in  1972  and  registered  as  a  global  entity  in  The  Hague,  the  Netherlands  in  September  2003,  the  ActionAid  International Secretariat is based in Johannesburg, South Africa.     ActionAid is committed to improving the quality of life of the poorest and the most excluded people  so that they can live a life of dignity. It has over three hundred thousand supporters across Europe.    ActionAid has been working in Nepal since 1982. Its mission here is to empower poor and excluded  people  to  eradicate  poverty  and  injustice.  The  work  of  ActionAid  International  Nepal  (AAIN),  hereafter  referred  to  as  ActionAid  Nepal  (AAN),  over  the  years  has  undergone  various  changes  informed by its engagement at the community and other levels. Its scope of work has thus grown in  content, coverage, commitment, and capacity to work in a multifarious situation over the period.  AAN changed its approach from direct service delivery to partnership mode with local NGOs in 1996.  Similarly, it adopted rights‐based approach in 1998 with an aim to creating an environment in which  poor  and  excluded  people  can  exercise  their  rights,  and  address  and  overcome  the  causes  and  effects  of  poverty.  Currently,  AAN’s  long‐term  partnership  programmes  at  field  level.  In  addition,  AAN  has  several  short‐term  engagements  with  over  200  NGOs,  CBOs,  Alliances,  Networks  and  Forums across the country.     AAN’s  rights  holders  are  the  poorest  and  the  most  excluded  people  particularly  women,  children,  victims of conflict and disasters, poor landless and tenants, people living with HIV and AIDS, Dalits,  indigenous  peoples,  former  Kamaiya,  people  with  disabilities,  and  urban  poor.  AAN  has  prioritised  five themes based on the local context and needs – Women’s Rights, Education, Food Security, HIV  and  AIDS  and  Peace  Building.  These  apart,  AAN  is  also  engaged  in  issues  such  as  Emergency  and  Disaster, Globalisation, Governance, Gender Equity, and Social Inclusion that cut across our priority  themes.      AAN works at the grassroots and at the national levels with various advocacy programmes in order  to influence public policies and practices in favour of the poorest and the most excluded people and  to address their immediate conditions. As a chapter of ActionAid International, AAN is also actively  engaged  in  advocating  at  the  regional  and  international  levels  on  issues  such  as  Women’s  Rights,  Education,  Food,  Human  Security  during  Conflict  and  Emergencies,  HIV  and  AIDS,  and  Just  and  Democratic Governance that cut across globally, to campaign for pro‐poor policies and to enable the  poor and excluded people to secure their rights.    Overall Objective of Mid Term Review (MTR)    The broad objective of the MTR is to study and analyse the project progress towards achieving the  set  objectives  and  recommend  ways  and  methods  of  improving  quality  and  efficiency  of  project  implementation.    The specific purpose of the MTR will be to  • Study and analyse the project processes to measure the extent of its progress towards achieving  the set objectives and anticipated results including sustenance of the results of the project, (vis‐ a‐vis indicators mentioned in the log frame).  • Analyse the relevance of the process and approach of the project to achieve set objectives and  anticipated results  21
  • • Study and analyse the project management and monitoring tools and its relevance in achieving  the set objectives and anticipated results  • Recommend course corrections, in terms of processes and actions so as to improve the overall  quality and efficiency of the project to achieve the set objectives and anticipated results  To analyse the project outcome in terms of empowerment, particularly with respect to building  capacities of women and other differentially vulnerable groups to participate and contribute to  the decision making process  To review the management and implementation processes adopted by the project   To analyse the level of ownership and receptiveness of the communities and their participation  in the implementation processes  To  review  and  analyse  the  contribution  of  the  project  to  ActionAid  Nepal’s  core  strategy  on  human  security,  emergency  and  disaster  management  in  line  with  the  revised  CSP  III  and  to  ActionAid International HST/IECT strategy  To  review  and  suggest  some  of  the  key  learning  and  practises  that  have  potential  for  wider  application and replication in similar approaches elsewhere, if any    Outcome/Product of Evaluation    The reviewer(s) are required to submit a detailed report in accordance with the objective(s) of MTR,  which will form the key outcome of the review process. The report is expected to be an analytical  document  that  will  satisfy  the  objective  of  the  MTR,  thereby  helping  the  project  to  strengthen  its  implementation processes adding quality and value to achievement of objectives. The report will be  shared  with  the  donors  (European  Commission  Humanitarian  Aid  department  and  AusAid),  ActionAid International IECT Team, ActionAid UK, ActionAid Australia, ActionAid Nepal management  and other key stakeholders for their information, comments and suggestions thereof.    Mid Term Review Report: The proposed structure of the report is as follows:  • Cover page  • Table of Contents  • Foreword/Acknowledgements  • Executive Summary (max. 3 pages)  • Main Body of the Report (max 25 pages)  • Key findings/observations against set parameters, as per objective  • Recommendations  • Acronyms  • MTR Schedule including interviewees, references etc.  • Terms of Reference    Methodology    In  order  to  develop  ownership  and  ensure  the  involvement  and  interest  of  the  stakeholders  for  sustainable changes and future developments, the assessment will be conducted in a participatory  way, involving AA team, project team, partner staff, consultants, beneficiaries, and other people or  institutions directly or indirectly involved in development and implementation of the project.     The following methods may be used:    » Review  of  the  project  documentation:  A  number  reports,  original  proposal  as  well  as  interim  reports  are  available.  Various  periodic  communication  bulletins  and  reports  are  available.  These sources will be a base on the reference of the project, which will help the evaluator(s) to  understand the project as well as summaries the achievements.  22
  • » Interview  of  the  key  staffs  of  the  projects:  Individual  interview  of  ActionAid  Nepal,  partners,  government officials and other key stakeholders involved.  » Participatory  group  exercise:  participatory  group  exercise  with  the  project’s  key  stakeholders  (different  disaster  management  committees,  National  and  International  NGOs,  government  officials, DIPECHO partners in Nepal) to review achievements, approaches and potentials.  » Community  Assessment:  participatory  methodologies  e.g.  focus  group  discussion,  interview,  case studies and other tools are suggested for community assessment.     Proposed Plan of Action for Evaluation    Preparation  Review of literature and documents  Preparation of field visit plan, schedule, tools and checklist for evaluation (to be finalised  with AA DIPECHO team)        Field Visit  Briefing meeting with ActionAid team  Field visit to ActionAid Nepal offices, partners offices, project area for various interview,  discussions, group meetings etc. as per the schedule    Reporting  Debriefing meeting with ActionAid team  Preparation of draft reports  Feedback on draft report  Submission of final report to ActionAid    Composition of the MTR Team    The MTR team will comprise of the following persons (provisional, subject to confirmation)    • Shakeb Nabi, IECT Nominee and DIPECHO Project Manager, AA Bangladesh (Team Leader)  • Grace Nicholas, Programme Coordinator, AA Australia  • Thir Bahadur GC, Deputy Secretary, Ministry of Home Affaris, Government of Nepal  • Sunita Gurung, Programme Officer, AusAid Nepal  • Intern (for translation and field support)    Proposed time Frame    The MTR will be conducted in the first week of March 2010. The suggested time frame is given  below:    NO OF  ACTIVITIES  DATE  REMARKS  DAYS  1. PREPARATION         Review of key documents   1 day      Preparation for the tools and checklists 1 day 2. FIELD VISIT INCLUDING TRAVEL TIME        23
  • Briefing meeting in ActionAid Nepal ½  day   Field visit (three districts)    Meeting with beneficiaries and key stakeholders both in    field including partner staff and partner NGOs  5 days    Physical verification of mitigation structures    Meeting with key stakeholders and DIPECHO partners in    Kathmandu including AA team and project staff  3. Analysis and REPORTING        Debriefing with AA team and preparation of draft report ½  day     Develop first draft of the evaluation report  2 days  TOTAL DAYS*  10 DAYS        Documents Available (partial list)    1. Project proposal  2. Activity reports  3. PVA reports and field database   4. Case studies  5. DIPECHO Partners bulletins  6. Minutes of DIPECHO partner coordination meetings  7. Periodic project reports by partners  8. Project management systems, guidelines and tools  9. Country Strategy Paper III (Revised)  10. Emergency and Disaster Management strategy for AA in Nepal  11. Human Security Policy of ActionAid International    Management and logistics of evaluation    ActionAid Nepal will be responsible for the in country logistics like travel, accommodation, etc. for  field  visit  and  meetings  with  different  stakeholders.  AA  staff  members  involved  in  the  project  will  accompany the evaluator in partners’ meeting and during field visit. The travel to the project site will  be  by  air  or  road,  as  found  appropriate.  The  evaluator  will  arrange  for  his  own  laptop  and  other  required  equipment.  The  evaluator  will  bear  the  final  responsibility  for  report  submission,  presentation and to fulfil achievement of the objectives of evaluation.      Contact Person in ActionAid    P. V. Krishnan  DIPECHO Project Manager, Krishnan.pv@actionaid.org; Cell: +977 97510 01368      24