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Friends of Lafitte Corridor
 

Friends of Lafitte Corridor

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A presentation given by Bart Everson at a Friends of Lafitte Corridor meeting on December 17, 2009.

A presentation given by Bart Everson at a Friends of Lafitte Corridor meeting on December 17, 2009.

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  • Back up, start over with map: What is it? Basic Facts three-mile strip extending from Basin St. to Canal Boulevard Historic roots as a transportation corridor that played a key role in the city’s early development links nine historic neighborhoods; eighteen schools; twenty-six churches; over a dozen public spaces, parks and recreational facilities
  • Current photo today: semi-abandoned vacant space with a scattering of City facilities, mix of businesses and homes — some occupied, some shuttered
  • Collage: Greenways Across America Across America, communities are turning underutilized and abandoned rights of way into urban greenways: corridors of protected open space that provide a safe, continuous path for non-motorized activities (walking, cycling, skating)
  • Many Benefits Urban greenways can provide safe routes to school and work, link neighborhoods to areas for recreation and shopping.
  • Trails + Placemaking Well-planned greenways offer communities improved quality of life, spur new investment and local business development, attract tourist dollars into inner-city neighborhoods
  • Example: Atlanta Beltline   Converting 33 miles of abandoned urban rail corridor into greenway — focus for new investments in transit, workforce housing, preservation and public art
  • Example: Minneapolis Midtown Greenway 5.5 miles of greenway in a 100 year old railway trench, connecting neighborhoods with public amenities, housing and commercial corridors (Midtown Greenway Land Use and Development Plan)
  • Example: Montreal Lachine Canal Trail nine miles of greenway on historic navigational canal, linking tourist center of Vieux Montreal with outlying neighborhoods; City of Montreal implemented program of tax incentives and zoning measures to stimulate mixed-use development and affordable housing
  • New Orleans' unique opportunity Cities and communities around the US and beyond are investing millions of dollars to acquire land for the creation of urban greenways; City of New Orleans has opportunity to create a greenway on land that is almost entirely publicly-owned
  • Connection node map Join together key segments of the City’s emerging pedestrian and bikeway network, providing a new route for non-motorized transportation in a population that is heavily transit-dependent
  • Park map Provide a link between new and existing parks, playgrounds, recreational facilities and community centers, encouraging active living and promoting public health
  • Cultural landmarks Connect locals and visitors to the history and culture of the Corridor-area neighborhoods; encouraging tourists to experience New Orleans beyond the French Quarter
  • Example: Turning basin
  • Example: Higgins facility
  • In a nutshell: a new public space amenity that can stimulate reinvestment in storm-damaged neighborhoods
  • Trail-Oriented Development Promote a more sustainable, compact, and livable city by reducing dependence on the automobile and encouraging trail-oriented development
  • Greenway funding sources The City has dedicated $11.6 M in federal Community Development Block Grant funding for land acquisition ($4M) and construction ($7.6M) of the Greenway. In addition,  Governmental agencies and non-profits including Regional Planning Commission, Department of Public Works, Mid-City Neighborhood Organization, Urban Conservancy and FOLC have worked together to secure an additional $.5 M in federal funding for construction of portions of greenway. ($313,000.00 in Transportation Enhancement, $225,000 -I think- in Rec Trails) 
  • Be it resolved City Council has resolved that public land within the Lafitte Corridor shall be “reserved and dedicated” for establishment of the Greenway, and authorized the creation of a Lafitte Greenway Steering Advisory Committee (panel of community residents and stakeholders who will be tasked with guiding planning and implementation of the Greenway)
  • ORDA vision Office of Recovery and Development Administration (ORDA) designated the Lafitte/Broad node as one of 17 “recovery target areas”
  • Two-pronged approach RFP for implementation of a Lafitte Corridor project defined by two key pieces: Build a safe, continuous trail amenity: the Greenway Leverage public investment in the Greenway to stimulate reinvestment in the neighborhoods along the Corridor
  • Design Workshop Selected from a dozen bids in May 2009
  • Next Steps Some of the tasks required for greenway development include: Complete land survey and title search of trail right of way Develop trail alignment plan with safe crossings and connections Develop trail implementation plan with cost projections, recommended construction sequence and project phasing Develop trail management plan
  • LAFITTE CORRIDOR REVITALIZATION PLAN Build upon Neighborhoods Rebuilding Plan and UNOP, and coordinate with Master Plan to develop: Template for future uses of publicly-owned land along the Greenway Land use, zoning recommendations and urban design guidelines to encourage trail-oriented development in blocks adjacent to the Greenway Public policy initiatives and public/private partnerships to facilitate reinvestment along the Corridor and in Corridor neighborhoods
  • FOLC collage Friends of Lafitte Corridor: coalition of New Orleans residents, neighborhood associations, and non-profit entities that are working together to promote the redevelopment of the Lafitte Corridor as a public open space amenity, or greenway.
  • FOLC's mission: The Friends of Lafitte Corridor seeks to preserve and revitalize the Lafitte Corridor and adjacent neighborhoods from the French Quarter to Canal Boulevard by advocating for and facilitating the creation of a greenway that encourages active living and economic development and links neighborhoods, cultural features, historic sites, retail areas and public spaces.
  • Accomplishments: public health and recreation   FOLC helped Tulane's School of Public Health launch a long-term study of the Greenway's impact on public health and physical activity.   FOLC is partnering with the Rails to Trails Conservancy and The Urban Conservancy to conduct an extensive outreach campaign and ensure that neighborhoods and stakeholders along the Greenway Corridor are brought into the planning process. (Urban Pathways Initiative)
  • Accomplishments: economic development   Working in coordination with other community organizations, FOLC succeeded in getting the entire Lafitte Corridor incorporated within the State of Louisiana's Cultural Districts program. This status establishes tax credits for original works of art produced within the Cultural District, and offers tax credits for rehabilitation of historic structures.
  • Accomplishments: construction costs As mentioned previously — Governmental agencies and non-profits including Regional Planning Commission, Department of Public Works, Mid-City Neighborhood Organization, Urban Conservancy and FOLC have worked together to secure an additional $.5 M in federal funding for construction of portions of greenway. ($313,000.00 in Transportation Enhancement, $225,000 -I think- in Rec Trails)  
  • Accomplishments: sustainability and environmental quality   FOLC secured  a grant from the Greater New Orleans Foundation to fund the development of sustainable stormwater management design concepts that can be integrated into planning and design of the Greenway.   FOLC won an Urban Forestry grant from the State to fund execution of a survey and assessment of the existing trees within the Lafitte Corridor. The data collected will help lay the groundwork for the Greenway to play a major role in restoring and expanding the City’s urban forest  
  • Accomplishments: Trust for Public Land FOLC played a key role in bringing TPL to the table to repurchase the so-called LIFT tract — bringing FOLC back full circle to its point of origin
  • Accomplishments: Cleanup   FOLC enlists help of Criminal Sheriff’s Office and Department of Sanitation to clear corridor segments; Ethan organized cleanup with Sierra Club
  • Accomplishments: Five annual hikes — and counting! Over a thousands miles of hiking.
  • MIT Silhouettes FOLC will continue to: work to gather input from all New Orleans residents who share an interest in the revitalization of the Lafitte Corridor partner with landowners, neighborhood groups and governmental entities to plan and implement the creation of the Lafitte Greenway as a public amenity that can help to promote the return of healthy communities to the heart of the city.
  • What you can do Continue to support fiscal, policy initiatives that will be required to bring these projects to fruition Help FOLC continue to share our message about the benefits which this project offers our community
  • Acknowledgments     Probably missing lots of people  

Friends of Lafitte Corridor Friends of Lafitte Corridor Presentation Transcript

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  • The Friends of Lafitte Corridor seeks to preserve and revitalize the Lafitte Corridor and adjacent neighborhoods from the French Quarter to Canal Boulevard by advocating for and facilitating the creation of a greenway that encourages active living and economic development and links neighborhoods, cultural features, historic sites, retail areas and public spaces.
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