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Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
Lesson guide   gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0
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Lesson guide gr. 3 chapter i -comprehension of whole numbers v1.0

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  • 1. Lesson Guide In Elementary Mathematics Grade 3 Reformatted for distribution via DepEd LEARNING RESOURCE MANAGEMENT and DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM PORTAL DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BUREAU OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION in coordination with ATENEO DE MANILA UNIVERSITY 2010 Chapter I Whole Numbers Comprehension of Whole Numbers INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS COUNCIL SECRETARIAT, 2011
  • 2. Lesson Guides in Elementary Mathematics Grade III Copyright © 2003 All rights reserved. No part of these lesson guides shall be reproduced in any form without a written permission from the Bureau of Elementary Education, Department of Education. The Mathematics Writing Committee GRADE 3 Region 3 Agnes V. Canilao – Pampanga Josefina S. Abo – Tarlac City Alma Flores – Bataan Region 4 - A Cesar Mojica – Regional Office Marissa J. de Alday – Quezon Henry P. Contemplacion – San Pablo City Region 4 – B Felicima Murcia – Palawan National Capital Region (NCR) Laura N. Gonzaga – Quezon City Dionicia Paguirigan – Pasig/San Juan Yolita Sangalang – Pasig/San Juan Bureau of Elementary Education (BEE) Elizabeth J. Escaño Galileo L. Go Nerisa M. Beltran Ateneo de Manila University Pacita E. Hosaka Support Staff Ferdinand S. Bergado Ma. Cristina C. Capellan Emilene Judith S. Sison Julius Peter M. Samulde Roy L. Concepcion Marcelino C. Bataller Myrna D. Latoza Eric S. de Guia - Illustrator Consultants Fr. Bienvenido F. Nebres, SJ – President, Ateneo de Manila University Ms. Carmela C. Oracion – Principal, Ateneo de Manila University High School Ms. Pacita E. Hosaka – Ateneo de Manila University Project Management Yolanda S. Quijano – Director IV Angelita M. Esdicul – Director III Simeona T. Ebol – Chief, Curriculum Development Division Irene C. Robles – OIC - Asst. Chief, Curriculum Development Division Virginia T. Fernandez – Project Coordinator EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Jesli A. Lapus – Secretary, Department of Education Teodosio C. Sangil, Jr. – Undersecretary for Finance and Administration Jesus G. Galvan – OIC - Undersecretary for Programs and Projects Teresita G. Inciong – Assistant Secretary for Programs and Projects Printed By: ISBN – 971-92775-2-1
  • 3. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ..................................................................................................................................iv Matrix ........................................................................................................................................v I. WHOLE NUMBERS A. Comprehension of Whole Numbers Identifying Cardinal Numbers from 1 000 to 10 000 ....................................................... 1 Identifying Cardinal Numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 .................................................. 11 Giving the Value of Each Digit in 4- to 5- Digit Numbers................................................ 15 Reading Numbers through 100 000 ............................................................................... 18 Writing Numbers through 100 000 ................................................................................. 23 Expressing the Relationship of Numbers........................................................................ 28 Writing Numbers in Expanded Form............................................................................... 33 Rounding Numbers to the Nearest Tens and Hundreds ................................................ 37 Rounding Numbers to the Nearest Thousands ............................................................. 41 Odd and Even Numbers ................................................................................................. 44 Reading Money in Symbols through Php1,000/Writing Money Value through 1,000....................................................................................... 49 Comparing Values of the Different Denomination of Coin/Bills through Php1,000 ...... 52 Reading and Writing Roman Numbers (L-C) ................................................................. 57 Reading and Writing Roman Numbers (C-D) ................................................................ 62 Reading and Writing Roman Numbers (D-M)……………………………………………... 65
  • 4. iv I N T R O D U C T I O N The Lesson Guides in Elementary Mathematics were developed by the Department of Education through the Bureau of Elementary Education in coordination with the Ateneo de Manila University. These resource materials have been purposely prepared to help improve the mathematics instruction in the elementary grades. These provide integration of values and life skills using different teaching strategies for an interactive teaching/learning process. Multiple intelligences techniques like games, puzzles, songs, etc. are also integrated in each lesson; hence, learning Mathematics becomes fun and enjoyable. Furthermore, Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) activities are incorporated in the lessons. The skills are consistent with the Basic Education Curriculum (BEC)/Philippine Elementary Learning Competencies (PELC). These should be used by the teachers as a guide in their day-to-day teaching plans.
  • 5. v MATRIX IN ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS Grade III COMPETENCIES VALUES INTEGRATED STRATEGIES USED MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES TECHNIQUES With HOTS I. Whole Numbers A. Comprehension of Whole Numbers 1. Read and write the numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words 1.1 Identify cardinal numbers 1.1.11000 through 10 000 Active Participation Looking for partners Modeling Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  1.1.210 001 though 100 000 Orderliness Looking for patterns Chart (Spatial) 1.2 Give the place value of each digit in 4 to 5 digit numbers Cooperation Make a table Guess and check Cooperative groups (Interpersonal) Hands and feet movements (B. kinesthetic) Puzzle (Logical mathematics)  1.3 Read numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Speed and accuracy Looking for patterns Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  1.4 Write numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Acceptance of challenge Make a table Puzzle (Logical mathematics) Play (Bodily Kinesthetic) Reading/writing numbers (Linguistic)  1.5 Express the relationship of numbers using expressions "less than," greater than and equal to (>, <, =) Respectfulness Modeling Simplifying the problem Diagram (Spatial)  1.6 Write 4 to 5 digit numbers in expanded form Respectfulness Listing Movements and manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  2. Round number to the 2.1 Nearest tens and hundreds Cooperation Modeling Simplifying the problem Diagram (Spatial) Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  2.2 Nearest thousands and ten thousands Physical fitness Modeling Simplifying the problem Diagram (Spatial)  3. Tell when a number is odd or even Cooperation Looking for patterns Acting out the problems Concept development Diagram (Spatial) Cooperative groups (Interpersonal)  4. Read and write money in symbols through 1000
  • 6. vi 4.1 Read money value in symbols through 1000 Thriftiness Simplifying the problem Storytelling (linguistic) Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  4.2 Write money value in symbols through 1000 Thriftiness Simplifying the problem Storytelling (linguistic) Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic) 4.3 Compare value of the different denominations of coins and bills through 1000 Cooperation Simplifying the problem Manipulative (Bodily kinesthetic)  5. Express Roman numbers through M in Hindu-Arabic symbols and vice-versa 5.1 Read and write the value of Roman numbers in Hindu-Arabic and vice-versa 5.1.1 L to C Love and care for animals Looking for patterns Play (Bodily Kinesthetic) Puzzle (Logical mathematics)  5.1.2 C to D Taking care of the sea Listing Global theme (Naturalist)  5.1.3 D to M Active participation Simplifying the problem Song (Musical) Cooperative groups(Interpersonal) 
  • 7. 1 Identifying Cardinal Numbers from 1000 to 10 000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Identify cardinal numbers from 1000 through 10 000 Psychomotor: Write the correct cardinal number in the given exercise Affective: Participate actively during the group and class discussion II. Learning Content Skill: Identifying cardinal numbers from 1000 to 10 000 Reference: BEC-PELC I A.1.1.1 Materials: flash cards, flats, longs, ones cube (thousand block) geometric cut outs, place value charts/mat, show-me-board Value: Active participation III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill * Game – “What Number Comes Next” * The teacher will divide the class into 2 groups. * Then, she/he will ask one representative from each group to be the first players. * The pupils stand at the far end of the room and tell the number that comes next to the number flashed by the teacher. * The pupil who answers first moves one step forward. The pupil who reaches the front gets a score. The group who scored 5 points wins the game. 2. Review Match column A with column B by drawing a line that connects them. 253 549 736 165 107 350 472 609 316 563 755 218 934 828 839 923 575 856 976 1000 A 1. eight hundred five a. 346 2. one hundred fifteen b. 625 3. four hundred eighty c. 805 4. six hundred twenty-five d. 480 5. three hundred forty-six e. 115
  • 8. 2 3. Motivation Present the illustration below. Flats Longs Cubes * How many flats are there? * How many longs are there? * How many cubes are there? * What numerals do they represent? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Let the pupils get their flats, longs and cubes in their Math Kit. Ask: How many ones are there in a (cube)? (1) How many cubes are there in a (long)? (10) How many cubes are there in a (flat)? (100) Is 999 correctly represented in the place value mat? What is the first place value starting from your right? What is the next? What is the third place value? b. Represent the numeral 999 through your flats, longs, cubes. Do it with a partner. Ask: “What happens if we add one more cube in the place?” Let the pupils add one in the ones place.
  • 9. 3 * How many s are there now? * What will you do if there are 10 s in the ones place? (Trade it/Exchange it with one (long) * How many longs can be made with 10 s? * Where will you place it now? (flats) Hundreds (longs) Tens (cubes) Ones c. How many longs do we have now? * What will you do if there are 10 s in the tens place? (Trade/Exchange it with one (flat) * How many flats can be made with 10 s? * Where will you place it now? d. How many flats do we have now? * What will you do if there are 10 s in the hundreds place? * What will you trade it for? (Introduce the thousands block) c) b) a) ?
  • 10. 4 * Where will you place it now? (Draw the next place value to compare hundreds which is the THOUSANDS) (thousand block) (flats) (longs) (cubes) THOUSANDS Hundreds Tens Ones c. 1 0 0 0 e. What is the next higher place value to hundreds? * How many cubes do we have now? (none) * How many longs do we have now? (none) * How many flats do we have now? (none) * How many blocks do we have now? (one) Introduce the number 1000. 10 flats are traded for 1 thousand-block. 1000 is 1 thousand 0 hundreds 0 tens 0 ones * How many is 1000 in hundreds? tens? ones? 1000 = 10 hundreds = 100 tens = 1000 ones f. Ask the pupils to represent 9000. Then ask them to add 1 more block to the thousands place. * How many blocks do you have now? (10) * What must you do with 10 blocks? (trade/exchange) * What will you trade for it? (10 thousand-block) But since the number is so large, we will represent it with a picture of bundle straws with 10 000 label. * Where will you place it now? (Draw and introduce the next place value to thousands which is the TEN THOUSANDS.)
  • 11. 5 Note: bundled straws will be used in 10 000 numerals bundle of 10 000 straws bundle of 1 000 straws or thousand blocks bundled of 100 straws or flats bundled of 10 straws or longs straw or one- cube Ten Thousands Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones 1 0 0 0 0 g. What is the next higher place value to thousands? * How many cubes do you have now? * How many longs do you have? * How many flats do you have? * How many blocks do you have? * How many bundles of 10 000 straws do you have? Introduce 10 000. 10 cubes are traded for 1 bundle of 10 000 straws. 10 000 is 1 ten thousand 0 thousands 0 hundreds 0 tens 0 ones. * How many is 10 000 in thousands? hundreds? tens? ones? 10 000 = 10 thousands = 100 hundreds = 1 000 tens = 10 000 ones or or or or
  • 12. 6 2. Fixing Skills The teacher posts some strips of cartolina with written numbers of blocks, flats, longs and cubes. She calls pupils to write the correct numeral opposite the strips. A B C Ask: What have you noticed with the numerals in set A? How many digits are there in each numeral? What about the numerals in set B, how many digits are there in each numeral? In set C, how many digits are there in the numeral? What is the highest place value in a 3-digit number? What is the highest place value in a 4-digit number? What is the highest place value in a 5-digit number? How do you know if a number is in hundreds only? What about the number in thousands? What about the number in ten thousands? How do they differ from one another? 3. Guided Practice a. Group Work – Game – (flash cards, place value mats/charts) Divide the class into 5 groups. The group will represent the given numeral through their cubes, flats, longs and ones. They will put their answer on the place value mats/charts on the board. The group with the most number of correct answers wins. 7 flats, 4 longs, and 6 cubes 3 flats, 0 longs and 3 cubes 4 flats, 1 long and 4 cubes = 746 = 303 = 414 1 block, 0 flats, 8 longs, 0 cube 7 blocks, 5 flats, 2 longs, 3 cubes 5 blocks, 1 flat, 7 longs, 8 cubes = 1 080 = 7 523 = 5 178 10 blocks = 10 000 3 502 7 345 5 040 2 197 1 259 10 000 8 052 6 372 1 475 4 856
  • 13. 7 b. Individual Work - Written The teacher gives the number of blocks, flats, longs and cubes orally and pupils will write the correct numeral on their show-me-board. 1) 6 blocks, 4 flats, 0 long, 4 cubes 2) 8 blocks, 6 flats, 3 longs, 3 cubes 3) 9 blocks, 3 flats, 0 long, 6 cubes 4) 1 block, 8 flats, 2 longs, 8 cubes 5) 4 blocks, 7 flats, 0 long, 1 cube 6) 2 blocks, 0 flat, 1 long, 5 cubes 7) 3 blocks, 5 flats, 5 longs, 2 cubes 8) 5 blocks, 1 flat, 4 longs, 7 cubes 9) 7 blocks, 2 flats, 7 longs, 0 cube 10) 9 blocks, 9 flats, 6 longs, 9 cubes Match column A with B. Write the letters only. A B _____ 1) 10 bundles of 1000 straws a. 2 500 _____ 2) 7 bundles of 1000 straws and 1 bundle of b. 9 000 10 straws c. 3 140 _____ 3) 21 bundles of 100 straws d. 2 120 _____ 4) 9 bundles of 1000 straws e. 1 001 _____ 5) 1 bundle of 1000 straws and 1 straw f. 4 680 _____ 6) 3 bundles of 1000 straws and 14 bundles g. 7 010 10 straws h. 3 210 _____ 7) 25 bundles of 100 straws i. 2 100 _____ 8) 4 bundles of 1000 straws, 6 bundles of j. 10 000 100 straws and 80 pieces more k. 2 510 _____ 9) 21 bundles of 100 straws and 20 pieces more _____10) 3 bundles of 1000 straws and 210 pieces more * Ask the pupils what they feel during the activities.  Did you participate actively during the activities? How?  Did you cooperate with your group? 4. Generalization How did we identify cardinal numbers from 1000 to 10000? Why is there a need to identify cardinal numbers? To identify cardinal numbers in thousands and in ten thousands, count the number of digits in the numeral. Thousands (1000) has 4 digits while ten thousands (10000) has 5 digits.
  • 14. 8 C. Application Work by pairs a. Reproduce the activity cards shown below. Give each pair a copy. Directions: Circle the correct numeral for each of the following 2) 4 537 4 573 753 1) 947 9 404 9 047 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 100 100 100 100 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 100 10 10 10 1001 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 1000 100 100 100 1 1 1 1 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000
  • 15. 9 3) 7 684 7 864 7 635 4) 111 2 213 2 223 5) 3 11 4 110 4 222 IV. Evaluation A. Individual Work Give the next number in the pattern. Write your answer on the blank. 1) 5 652, 5 653, ________, 5 655, 5 656 2) 1 047, 1 048, 1 049, ________, 1 051 3) ________, 3 125, 3 126, 3 127, 3 128 4) 9 996, 9 997, 9 998, 9 999, ________ 5) 1 000, ________, 1 002, 1 003, 1 004 6) 1 425, 1 426, ________, 1 428, 1 429 7) ________, 2 304, 2 305, 2 306, 2 307 8) 8 411, ________, 8 413, ________, 8 415 1 000 100 10 1 1 000 100 10 1 1 1 000 100 10 1 1 000 1 000 1 000 100 10 1 1 000 100 10 1 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 1 000 100 100 100 100 100 10 10 1 1 1 1
  • 16. 10 9) 7 123, 7 124, ________, 7 126, ________ 10) 2 564, ________, ________, 2 567, 2 568 B. Work by Pairs CONNECT-THE-DOTS Directions: Complete the picture by connecting the dots starting from 9988. V. Assignment A. Name the numeral that comes before the given cardinal number. 1) ________ 2 599 2) ________ 1 001 3) ________ 1 053 4) ________ 2 410 5) ________ 9 999 6) ________ 4 647 7) ________ 8 409 8) ________ 6 751 9) ________ 5 142 10) ________ 3 144 B. Write the numeral. 1) 100 more than 9 000 is __________________. 2) 1 000 less than 8000 is ___________________. 3) 10 more than 2 100 is ___________________. 4) 100 more than 2 587 is __________________. 5) 1 000 less than 5700 is ___________________.
  • 17. 11 Identifying Cardinal Numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Identify cardinal numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 Psychomotor: Read and write numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 Affective: Tell the importance of doing things in order. II. Learning Content Skills: Identifying cardinal numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 Reading and writing cardinal numbers from 10 001 to 100 000 Reference: BEC PELC I A 1.1.2 Materials: place value chart, flashcards Value: Orderliness III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill a. Conduct a drill on reading four to five-digit numbers using flash cards. Have them read these numbers. Then let them tell the place value of the underlined digit. b. Divide the class in groups with 4 members in each group. - Give each group a set of numbers. - From these digits the pupils will form the highest and the lowest three- or four- digit numbers. 3 254 4 581 8 206 7 005 3 028 9 750 4 010 6 796 4 126 5 002 3 572 6 003 1 2 3 4 Round 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 Round 2 Round 3 Round 4
  • 18. 12 2. Motivation a. Tell the pupils to go outside for a few minutes. Disarrange their chairs/desks but be sure each chair/desk is numbered. b. Tell the pupils to come in and find their seats. Ask: Can you find your seats easily? Why? Why not? Let the children arrange their seats in order. c. After the activity, lead the pupils to cite the importance of putting things in order. Ask: What helps you put this chairs/desks in their proper places? d. Relate this to the order of numbers. Say that the order of numbers makes counting and writing number easy. C. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Present this problem. Mount Everest is the highest mountain on earth. It is part of the Himalayan ranges. It is about 29 140 feet high. Look at the place value chart and see how the digits are grouped. Thousands Units Hundreds Tens Ones Hundreds Tens Ones 2 9 1 4 0 We read: Twenty nine thousand one hundred forty We write: 29 140 The digits are grouped by threes. Each group of three digits is called a period. Each period has hundreds, tens and ones places. A space separates the thousands period from the units period. Ask: How many digits are there in ten thousands? b. Present another problem. Mt. Pinatubo, a volcano in Zambales, erupted in June 1991. It was the most destructive volcanic eruption. Newspaper reports said that about 100 000 houses were destroyed at that time. Write the figures in the place value chart. Thousands Units Hundreds Tens Ones Hundreds Tens Ones 1 0 0 0 0 0 thousands period units period
  • 19. 13 We read: One hundred thousand We write: 100 000 How many digits are there in hundred thousands? 2. Guided Practice a. Working in Triads Give the next number in the pattern. 1) 27 253, ______ 47 253, 57 253 2) 85 578, 86 578, ______ 88 578 3) 56 584, 56 684, 56 784, ______ 4) 45 254, 45 354, _____, 45 554 5) 73 067, 74 067, _____, 76 067 b. Working in Dyads Name the numeral that comes before or after the given cardinal number. 1) 18 607 ________ 2) ________ 100 000 3) 39 415 ________ 4) ________ 23 985 5) 73 069 ________ 6) ________ 40 365 7) 90 108 ________ 8) ________ 59 668 9) 96 768 ________ 10) ________ 78 564 c. Group Activity 1.Divide the class into 5 groups. 2.Teacher prepares numbers in the pocket chart. 3.The pupils line up and determine the order of the players who are going to play from each group. 4.The teacher calls out a number from the pocket chart. The first player of each group will get the number from the pocket chart. 5.Pupils read the number after they get it. 6.Repeat the procedure. 7.The group with the most points wins the game. Examples: d. Another Activity - Teacher dictates a number then the pupils write it on their show-me-board. 36 208 73 100 10 051 25 815 99 989 100 000 75 231 50 026 13 483 19 056 39 276 47 201 15 653 2 321 66 511 39 400
  • 20. 14 3. Generalization How do you identify cardinal numbers through 100 000? Numbers through 100 000 have two periods – unit period and thousand period. Hundred thousands have six digits. C. Application Match column A with column B by drawing a line to connect them. Column A Column B 1) 18 901 a. sixty-one thousand five hundred thirty-eight 2) 89 973 b. forty-six thousand three hundred twenty-two 3) 46 322 c. eighteen thousand nine hundred one 4) 61 538 d. seventy-eight thousand nine hundred eighty-six 5) 78 986 e. eighty-nine thousand nine hundred seventy-three f. sixty-one thousand five hundred eight IV. Evaluation A. Write the number that comes before and after. 1 _________ 80 040 __________ 2) _________ 53 456 __________ 3) _________ 99 954 __________ 4) _________ 43 201 __________ 5) _________ 11 561 __________ B. Write the smallest number and the largest five-digit number that can be formed. smallest biggest 1) 0, 3, 4, 1, 8 _______ _______ 2) 7, 6, 5, 9, 0 _______ _______ 3) 3, 5, 7, 0, 1 _______ _______ 4) 9, 4, 2, 1, 5 _______ _______ 5) 6, 3, 0, 1, 5 _______ _______ V. Assignment Name the counting numbers between each of the following pairs of numbers. 1) 13 407 and 13 411 2) 41 880 and 41 885 3) 72 751 and 72 759 4) 94 970 and 94 975 5) 67 841 and 67 846
  • 21. 15 Giving the Value of Each Digit in 4- to 5-Digit Numbers I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Give the place value of each digit in 4-to 5-digit numbers Psychomotor: Write the value of each digit in 4- to 5-digit numbers Affective: Cooperate in group activities II. Learning Content Skill: Giving the value of each digit in 4- to 5-digit numbers Reference: BEC PELC I.A 1.2 Materials: number cards, place value chart, chart Value: Cooperation III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill a. Search for the five numbers on the face of the child. b. Form numbers using the five numbers you found following the characteristics below. 1. smallest five-digit number (30 478) 2. biggest five-digit number (87 430) 3. largest four-digit number that uses two digits twice 4. smallest four-digit number that uses two digits twice 5. biggest five-digit number that uses one digit twice and one digit thrice. 2. Review Write the numerals of the following items below. a. 6 hundreds, 5 tens, 3 ones = b. 7 hundreds, 2 tens, 7 ones = c. 3 hundreds, 8 tens, 1 ones = d. 5 hundreds, 7 tens, 4 ones = e. 2 hundreds, 4 tens, 8 ones = 3. Motivation Form 3 groups with five members each. Give each group five number cards like the ones below. Before we proceed with our activity, what should each member remember when doing activities in group? Focus on cooperation. How do non-members cooperate?
  • 22. 16 Formed Numbers a. Form the highest number using all the digits. b. Form the smallest number. c. Do this again using another set of numbers. B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Present the place value chart. Use the numbers that the pupils formed. Ten Thousands Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones 9 8 7 4 2 2 4 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 6 b. Read the first number in the chart. How many digits are there? What is the place value of 9?, 8?, 7?, 4?, 2? Give the value of each digit. Meaning of Digit Value Place Value 9 8 7 4 2 2 x 1 2 ones 4 x 10 40 tens 7 x 100 700 hundreds 8 x 1 000 8 000 thousands 9 x 10 000 90 000 ten thousands Meaning of Numeral Value Place Value 2 4 7 8 9 9 x 1 9 ones 8 x 10 80 tens 7 x 100 700 hundreds 4 x 1 000 4 000 thousands 2 x 10 000 20 000 ten thousands Meaning of Numeral Value Place Value 1 2 3 4 6 6 x 1 6 ones 4 x 10 40 tens 3 x 100 300 hundreds 2 x 1 000 2 000 thousands 1 x 10 000 10 000 ten thousands 9 7 2 8 4
  • 23. 17 2. Guided Practice a. Working in pairs Look at the place value chart then complete the table below. Ten Thousands Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones 6 7 5 2 1 5 3 6 7 8 1) 67 521 means ___ ten thousands ___ thousands ___ hundreds ___ tens ___ ones 2) 53 678 means ___ ten thousands ___ thousands ___ hundreds ___ tens ___ ones 3) 67 521 means 60 000 + ____ + ____ + ____ + ____ 4) 53 678 means ____ + 3 000 + ____ + ____ + ____ + ____ b. Working in Fours Give the place value of the following numbers by changing the place value to some body movements. ones – clap your hands tens – stamp your foot hundreds – vow your head thousands – move the hand sideward ten thousands – Jumping Jack Do the actions based on the value of the number under each place value. Example 21 511 Meaning – one clapping of hand one stamping of foot five vowing of heads and so on and so forth Numbers: 12 321 22 321 33 212 c. Individual activity Give the place value of the underlined digit. Raise your show me board! 1) 67 415 2) 33 216 3) 87 412 4) 91 578 5) 61 432 3. Generalization How many digits do numbers with up to thousands place have? Can you tell the value of a number by the number of digits present in it? Numbers up to thousands place have four digits. Numbers up to ten thousands place have five digits.
  • 24. 18 C. Application Guess and check Build a five-digit number out of the following without repetition. List 3 possible answers for each. IV. Evaluation A. Give the place value and value of the encircled number Place Value Value 1) 6 1 215 ____________ ______________ 2) 9 0 273 ____________ ______________ 3) 5 9 0 16 ____________ ______________ 4) 9 8 768 ____________ ______________ 5) 8 0 702 ____________ ______________ V. Assignment Write the correct numeral. 1) 50 000 + 4 thousands + 3 hundreds + 90 + 7 ones ________ 2) 50 000 + 3 000 + 500 + 40 + 3 ________ 3) 4 ten thousands 3 thousands 2 hundreds 9 tens and 7 ones __________ 4) 60 000 + 2 000 + 3 hundreds + 2 tens + 1 ones _________ 5) 6 ten thousands + 2 000 + 400 + 5 tens + 4 ones _________ Reading Numbers through 100 000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Read numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Psychomotor: Match numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Affective: Show speed and correctness in reading numbers II. Learning Content Skill: Reading numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Reference: BEC PELC I A.1.3 Materials: number board, cartolina strips, charts Value: Speed and accuracy 8 in the ten thousands place 6 in the hundreds place 7 in the ten thousands place 9 in the thousands place 5 in the ones place 1 in the ones place 1) 2) 3)
  • 25. 19 III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Write the missing number in the series. 1) 100, 150, 200, ___, 300 2) 200, 400, 600, ___, 1000 3) 150, 300, ___, 600, 750 4) 50, 100, ___, 200, 250 5) 1 000, 2 000, 3 000, ____, 5 000 2. Review Identify the digit referred to by the place value beside the number. Then look for the code and write them in the boxes provided for on the following page. 1) 67 421 thousands 2) 34 578 ten thousands 3) 5 321 thousands 4) 12 521 thousands 5) 89 321 thousands 6) 15 465 hundreds 7) 71 399 thousands 8) 88 434 thousands 9) 51 043 hundreds 10) 16 215 thousands L O V E N U M B E R 0 – E 5 – V 1 – M 6 – R 2 – E 7 – L 3 – O 8 – B 4 – U 9 – N 1. Motivation Draw five boxes on the board. 6 9 8 7 5 Say: We are going to write in the boxes a five-digit number. Listen 3 apples + 2 apples = ___. Write the answer on the ones place 2 mangoes + 4 mangoes = ___. Write the answer on the ten thousands place. 1 pencil + 8 pencils = ____. Write on the thousands place. 7 blue birds + 1 blue bird = ____. Write on the hundreds place. 6 yellow flowers + 1 yellow flower = ____. Write on the tens place. Read the number. Then show them the number word. Ask them to read the word.
  • 26. 20 B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Present this word problem. Miss Canilao deposited some money in the bank. She wrote the following in the deposit slip. How much money did Miss Canilao deposit in the bank? How did she write the amount in the deposit slip? b. Let’s read some more numbers. 51 761 fifty-one thousand seven hundred sixty-one 83 478 eighty-three thousand, four hundred seventy-eight 100 000 one hundred thousand 2. Guided Practice a. Match column A with Column B. A B 1) 12 103 a. ninety-one thousand four hundred fifteen 2) 39 430 b. twelve thousand one hundred three 3) 98 624 c. thirty-nine thousand four hundred thirty 4) 93 765 d. ninety-eight thousand six hundred twenty-four 5) 91 415 e. ninety-three thousand seven hundred sixty-five f. ninety-one thousand four hundred five
  • 27. 21 b. “ORGANIZE ME” * Working in Dyads Give each pair strips of cartolina with numbers written on them. Chop the number by period then let the pupils organize them. (Make at least five.) * Working in Fours “Big Number Search” Read each number word below then encircle that number on the number board. The number may go down, across, diagonally or backward. 1. one hundred ninety thousand, five hundred sixty-four 2. one hundred seventy-eight thousand, three hundred five 3. ninety thousand, six hundred forty-two 4. fifteen thousand, four hundred eleven 5. forty thousand, five hundred twelve (Number Board) 4 1 9 0 5 6 4 1 2 0 5 0 3 3 1 7 7 8 5 4 6 2 2 0 3 8 7 1 3 4 4 1 4 2 3 4 2 2 2 4 6 5 9 0 1 0 1 0 8 1 1 4 5 1 624 534 six hundred twenty-four thousand five hundred thirty four 100 001 one hundred thousand one 57 784 fifty-seven thousand seven hundred eighty-four
  • 28. 22 3. Generalization How do we read numbers? To read numbers in figures follow these steps: 1. Read the digit in the first period at the left. 2. Say the period where the digits are. 3. Say only the digits in the units period. Why is it necessary for us to read numbers properly? Application 4. Read each address envelope. Match it by writing the letter in the correct mailbox. 2. Use the table to identify the planet Planet Mean orbital velocity around the sun (miles per hour) Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn 107 132 78 364 66 641 53 980 29 216 21 565 (Source: www.grandpapencil.net/project/plansped.htm) A Hesed Leo Go 15678 Math Village Philippines B Jameson Rodil 47415 Math Village Philippines C Wenson Leynes 59215 Math Village Philippines D Kenneth Urbina 78564 Math Village Philippines E Joven Limbo 47789 Math Village Philippines F Lou Mariam Go 34567 Math Village Philippines 1. Its speed has number 2 at the start and 6 at the end. 2. Its speed is a six-digit number. 3. Its speed is twenty one thousand five hundred sixty-five 4. Its speed is sixty-six thousand six hundred forty-one 5. Its speed is fifty-three thousand nine hundred eighty 6. Its speed is seventy-eight thousand three hundred sixty-four
  • 29. 23 Did you get the correct answers? How did you do it? Were you able to finish answering all the items? Is it good to be fast and accurate in doing an activity? Why? IV. Evaluation A. Choose the letter of the correct answer. 1) 15 thousand 4 hundred thirty-one a. 15 331 b. 15 431 c. 15 314 d. 15 615 2) 100 thousand a. 100 001 b. 10 000 c. 1 000 d. 100 000 3) seventy-eight thousand five hundred sixty-one a. 78 561 b. 78 516 c. 78 517 d. 78 571 4) ninety-five thousand, seven hundred sixty-three a. 95 783 b. 95 793 c. 95 763 d. 95 773 5) eighty-six thousand eight hundred seventy-four a. 86 874 b. 86 884 c. 86 894 d. 86 864 V. Assignment Read the following numbers, then write the numbers that come before and after. 1) ______________ 61 478 _______________ 2) ______________ 57 692 _______________ 3) ______________ 88 999 _______________ 4) ______________ 57 643 _______________ 5) ______________ 54 784 _______________ 6) ______________ 99 999 _______________ 7) ______________ 100 001 _______________ 8) ______________ 57 694 _______________ 9) ______________ 89 786 _______________ 10) ______________ 78 630 _______________ Writing Numbers through 100 000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Write numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Psychomotor: Write correctly the number words Affective: Accept challenge during group activities
  • 30. 24 II. Learning Content Skill: Writing numbers through 100 000 in symbols and in words Reference: BEC PELC I A.1.4 Materials: cut-outs of triangles, puzzle, place value chart, cassette, cassette tape Value: Acceptance of challenge III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill a. Write the smallest three-digit number. b. Write the biggest three-digit number. c. Write a three-digit number which is 100 less than 999. d. 10 more than 360 e. 100 more than 729 f. 1 000 more than 3 674 g. 1 000 less than 5 784 h. 234 and 1 000 put together i. Combine 154 and 2 000 j. Count 1 000 and 500 more 2. Review Display 10 triangles with numbers written on each. Ask the pupils to remove the triangle when the teacher says the number inside it. 3. Motivation Puzzle. Find the number words in the puzzle. They may go down, across or backwards. 65 415 100 000 78 121 15 265 14 314 31 415 16 329 18 515 214 78 34 154
  • 31. 25 S E V E N T Y S S H S I T H R E E I U W E W O I E A E N I N E U O N E A D B A N A T S I T R X I T E T I G S E Y E Y I W A H I D N A S U O H T X F S B I C B A Y A I U C X F O R T Y J S N I N E T Y A B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation Present this situation. a. About ninety-eight thousand, four hundred twenty-three boy scouts joined the jamboree at Mt. Makiling. Write the number words in figures in the place value chart. Thousands Unit tens ones hundreds tens ones 9 8 4 2 3 To write in words – Ninety-eight thousand, four hundred twenty-three To write in figures – 98 423 b. Here are other examples. Pupils will continue putting the numbers in the place value chart. Thousands Unit tens ones hundreds tens ones We read 4 6 7 3 5 46 735 7 4 1 2 3 74 123 8 2 9 0 7 82 907 9 3 0 8 4 93 084 3 7 5 8 9 37 589 Write the number words in figures. Forty-six thousand seven hundred thirty-five Seventy-four thousand one hundred twenty-three Eighty-two thousand nine hundred seven Ninety-three thousand eighty-four Thirty-seven thousand five hundred eighty-nine
  • 32. 26 2. Guided practice a. Race with your partner to fill in the number puzzle. They are to write the number symbol for each number word. 3 5 2 4 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 8 7 6 2 5 0 5 1 3 1 8 7 6 5 1 3 2 4 5 1 1 0 1 3 5 2 6 7 8 4 1 5 1 2 1 0 0 2 1 1 2 7 6 5 2 0 0 1 5 Across A. thirty-five thousand two hundred forty-five E. one hundred thousand F. ninety-eight thousand seven hundred sixty-two G. fifty thousand five hundred thirteen H. eight thousand seven hundred sixty-five L. thirty-two thousand four hundred fifty-one M. one thousand thirteen N. twenty-six thousand seven hundred eighty-four O. one thousand five hundred twelve P. ten thousand twenty-one Q. twelve thousand seven hundred sixty-five R. twenty thousand fifteen Down A. thirty thousand five hundred fifteen B. twenty nine thousand five hundred thirty two C. forty eight thousand one hundred twenty six D. fifty seven thousand three hundred forty seven E. twelve thousand one hundred fourteen H. eighty one thousand one hundred I. seventy thousand five hundred J. sixty one thousand one hundred twenty one K. fifty three thousand two hundred fifteen b. Rewrite the number words based on the figures to the left. 1) 932 – two thirty hundred nine 2) 4 516 – sixteen hundred four thousand five 3) 8 735 – thirty seven thousand eight five hundred 4) 50 127 – one hundred fifty twenty-seven thousand 5) 68 387 – sixty eight hundred seven eighty thousand three A B C D E F G H I J KL M O P Q R L N
  • 33. 27 c. Game – “Pass it on” Ask the children to form a circle. An object will be passed from one child to another while the music plays. When the music stops, the child who holds the object will answer the exercises below. Supply the missing words and read. 1) 62 136 ____ thousand one ____ six 2) 18 250 eighteen ____ two ____ fifty 3) 57 812 fifty _____ thousand _____ hundred ____ 4) 60 127 ____ thousand one hundred ______ seven 5) 83 463 eighty three thousand ______ hundred _____ How should you write numbers in figures especially in personal checks? Why is it that when we write the amount of money in checks, we are required to write the amount in figures and in words? How did you find the activities? Was it challenging? Were you able to do all the activities effectively? 3. Generalization What are the things that we should remember when we are writing numbers in figures? In words?  To write large numbers in figures, we use spaces to separate the digits into periods or groups of three starting from the right.  Thousands have two periods – the units should always be composed of three digits. Use zero as a place value holder when necessary.  To write numbers in words, write them as they are read. C. Application Read the following sentences and write each number in words. 1. There are about 20 865 people who attended the 4 th World Meeting of families at the Luneta. 2. Mother gathered 6 125 eggs from their poultry. 3. All the 4 250 pupils of Bagong Silang Elementary School participated in the launching of Zero Garbage in the school. 4. There are about 25 160 registered voters in Barangay Kaunlaran. 5. Mr. Gonzales picked 2 561 mangoes from his orchard. IV. Evaluation A. Answer each question in number words 1. What number is 1 000 more than 3 650? 2. What number is 1 500 more than 5 365? 3. What number is 10 000 more than 23 150? 4. What number is 1 500 less than 8 725? 5. What number is 10 000 less than 13 786? B. Write each number word in standard form. 1. Seventy thousand eight hundred one 2. nine thousand three 3. fourteen thousand two hundred eighty-six 4. twenty-five thousand one hundred thirty 5. two thousand ninety
  • 34. 28 V. Assignment A. Write the underlined number in words. 1. Mr. Go sold 1 560 coconuts on the first day. 2. On the second day, he sold 2 564 coconuts. 3. On the third day, he sold 7 876 coconuts. 4. He sold a total of 12 000 coconuts in three days. B. Write the underlined number word in figures. A shoe factory has delivered the following items in different stores. 1. three thousand, eight hundred ninety-two pairs of ladies shoes 2. seven thousand, five hundred pairs of men shoes 3. five thousand, six hundred fifty pairs of boy’s shoes 4. two thousand, nine hundred ten pairs of girl’s shoes and 5. one thousand, two hundred sixty-five pairs of shoes for infants 6. All in all, the shoe factory was able to deliver twenty-one thousand, two hundred seventeen Expressing the Relationship of Numbers I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Express the relationship of numbers using the expressions “less than”, “greater than” and “equal” (>, <, =) Psychomotor: Use the symbols >, < or = in comparing numbers Affective: Respect people’s differences II. Learning Content Skills: Expressing the relationship of numbers Reference: BEC PELC I.A.1.5 Materials: charts Value: Respect III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Call on a pair of pupils to answer each question. The first pupil who answers it correctly is the winner. Do the same with other pairs. Example: Which numeral has more tens? 38 or 48, 122 or 243 Which numeral has more hundreds? 893 or 900, 600 or 423 Which numeral has more thousands? 4 623 or 2 625, 3 643 or 7 415
  • 35. 29 2. Review Write the appropriate sign in each pair of numbers. Use >, < or =. 1) 246 ___ 154 2) 497 ___ 168 3) 140 ___ 193 4) 87 ___ 64 5) 187___ 32 6) 99 ___ 78 7) 782 ___ 149 8) 538 ___ 767 9) 429 ___ 329 10) 199 ___ 991 3. Motivation Call on two pairs of children with opposite qualities. Let the class compare these pairs of pupils. e.g. big/chinky eyes, straight/kinky hair, straight/curly hair, long/short hair Stress the value of respecting other people. Should you laugh at other people’s defects? Why? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation How did we know that 400 is less than 450? Why? What did we compare first? Next? ● Let us compare bigger numbers. Read. Mr. Go gathered 2 525 eggs. Mrs. Go gathered 2 578 eggs. Who gathered more eggs? Arrange 2525 and 2578 in column. Compare 2 525 and 2 578. 1. Are the number of digits the same? 2. Are the left-hand digits or the digits in the highest place value the same? 3. Are the next digits the same? 4. Compare the third digits of the numbers. Which is greater, 2 or 7? 5. The greater number is 2 578. 6. The smaller number is ____. Therefore 2 525 < 2 578 2 578 > 2 525 Look at the number line. 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 What numbers come before 450? Are they less than 450? What numbers come after 450? Are they greater than 450? We say: 400 is less than 450 400 < 450 420 is less than 450 420 < 450 460 is greater than 450 460 > 450 450 is equal to 450 450 = 450
  • 36. 30 Try other numbers. 78 416 __ 78 516 5 345 __ 5 345 32 141 __ 31 211 7 464 __ 7 644 4 789 __ 478 3 215 __ 3 000 + 200 + 10 + 5 2. Guided Practice a. Divide the class into two. Game – JUMP THE ANSWER Draw the following on the floor or use cartolina. Each group should be given/provided with a set of these symbols. 1. Look at the pair of numbers to be flashed by the teacher. 2. Compare the numbers – then jump to your chosen answer. 3. The group with more points wins. (Samples) 1) 216 ___ 260 2) 400 + 50 + 3 ___ 443 3) 1 286 ___ 1 828 4) 3 946 ___ 3 000 + 900 + 40 + 6 5) 6 000 + 700 + 60 + 2 ___ 5 000 + 600 + 70 + 2 6) 3 478 ___ 13 478 b. Balancing mobiles Working in pairs Provide each pair a copy of this activity. Explain. If we are to use >, < or = What does this mean? lesser value greater value > = < equal value 1. 2.
  • 37. 31 Supply the numbers on the blank and compare by using < > =. 1. 2. 3. Give 5 possible answers. Write only 1 in the scale. Write the other 4 beside the scale. 4. Give 5 possible answers. Write only one in the scale. Write the other four beside the scale. 5. Give 5 possible answers. Write only one in the scale; the other four beside the scale. c. Math Kinesthetics – (Individual) Compare the following numbers using the following gestures. less than greater than equal left hand up right up equal sign 525 525 3 010 + 1 000 6 578 17 541 1 500
  • 38. 32 1) 2 345 _____ 4 263 3) 6 212 _____ 6 212 5) 7 476 _____ 7 568 7) 9 806 _____ 8 315 9) 8 943 _____ 8 952 2) 7 904 _____ 70 00 + 900 + 0 + 4 4) 4 576 _____ 5 000 + 400 + 70 + 6 6) 9 300 _____ 9 000 + 300 + 0 + 0 8) 6 232 _____ 6 000 + 200 + 30 + 4 10) 2 040 _____ 2 000 + 0 + 40 + 0 3. Generalization How do you compare large numbers? Why is comparing the values of numbers important? In comparing large numbers: 1. Compare first the number of digits. If they are not equal, the number with more digits has the greater value. The number with lesser digits has the lesser value. 2. If the number of digits is the same, we compare first the digits on the left. If these are the same, we compare the next and so on. The symbol > means greater than, < stands for less than and = means equal to. C. Application Read the following problems then answer the questions that follow. 1. Ate Agnes bought a piano for 28,575 while Tita Laura bought her piano for 29,350. Who bought a cheaper piano? 2. The dining set costs 6,750. The sala set costs 9,385. Which set of furniture costs more? 3. Mr. Santos bought a horse for 4,980. Mr. Reyes also bought a horse for 3,985. Whose horse costs more? IV. Evaluation A. Read and answer the questions. 1. Mr. Rosales sold a piece of land for 455,200. Mr. Hermosa sold his piece of land for 460,350. Whose piece of land costs more? 2. Edwin and Conrado gathered 2350 chicos on Monday. On Tuesday, they gathered 2125 chicos. When did they gather fewer chicos? B. Which has more thousands? Copy the number. 1) 9 878 or 8 789 2) 5 946 or 9 465 3) 6 897 or 1 689 4) 4 800 or 8 640 5) 7 643 or 6 437 C. Answer the following 1. What number is 10 000 less than 86 784? 2. 15 678 more than 50 000 is what number? 3. 5 225 is 1 005 more than what number? 4. 2 455 is 1 000 less than what number? 5. What number is equal to 8 000 + 900 + 50 + 6?
  • 39. 33 V. Assignment A. Compare the numbers and write >, < or = on the blank. 1) 4 860 ___ 4 587 2) 15 678 ___ 51 784 3) 5 862 ___ 8 652 4) 27 431 ___ 27 314 5) 2 738 ___ 7 321 6) 39 812 ___ 39 712 7) 7 876 ___ 6 787 8) 48 678 ___ 48 786 9) 6 234 ___ 2 346 10) 57 891 ___ 57 891 B. Fill in the blank with the appropriate answers. 1) 78 thousand + 500 + 78 = _____ 2) 16 215 > ____ or ____ 3) 87 541 < ____ or ____ 4) 21 891 > ____ or ____ 5) 84 3416 < ____ or ____ 6) 8911 < ____ or ____ 7) 7678 > ____ or ____ 8) 18 000 + 7000 + 600 + 50 + 4 = ____ 9) 26 000 + 3 000 + 500 = ____ 10) 4 125 + 678 = ____ Writing Numbers in Expanded Form I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Write 4-to 5-digit numbers in expanded form. Psychomotor: Give the values of the digits of a number Affective: Show respect to opposite sex II. Learning Content Skill: Writing numbers in expanded form Reference: BEC PELC I A 1.6 Materials: straws, number cards, chart Value: Respect III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Relay The pupil will make a big step going to the finish line as he answers correctly. Give the value of the underlined digit. 3 7 5 6 9 4 1 2 7 4 9 4 8 9 3 2 3 7 8 6 5 4 8
  • 40. 34 2. Review Write the following numbers in expanded form. Ex. 613 = 600 + 10 + 3 523 = ______ + _______ + _______ 476 = ______ + _______ + _______ 477 = ______ + _______ + _______ 925 = ______ + _______ + _______ 894 = ______ + _______ + _______ 3. Motivation Giving names. Give at least five ways of writing each number. 2 4 7 8 9 6 Ex. Two II 1 + 1 2 + 0 1 x 2 Today you shall learn the other ways of writing numbers. B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. ● Group the class into four. ● Provide each group a box of straws. ● Let the pupils separate the green, yellow, red, blue and white straws. ● Remind them of the color coding of the straws. (Write them on the board) Green - ten thousands Yellow - thousands Red - hundreds Blue - tens White - ones ● Show a number. Example 26 578 ● The pupils will have: two green straws + 6 yellow straws + 5 red straws + 7 blue straws + 8 white straws or 2 ten thousands + 6 thousands + 5 hundreds + 7 tens + 8 ones or 2(10 000) + 6 (1 000) + 5 (100) + 7 (10) + 8 (1) or 20 000 + 6 000 + 500 + 70 + 8 – Expanded Form b. Give other examples: Follow the steps above. 17 415, 13 201, 113 001 32 784, 15 678
  • 41. 35 2. Guided Practice a. Working in Groups Form groups of 12 members. Give each group the following number cards. Mechanics: 1) Listen to the number the teacher will say or/the teacher may write it on the board. 2) Give the expanded form by arranging the cards from left to right. Ex. 54 321 54 123 45 132 32 145 b. Working in dyads Complete the chart. c. “SEARCH ME” Divide the class into two – There should be equal number of members for both groups. Give each female pupil a card with numbers and the boys, cards with expanded form. They are to search for his/her right partner. Ask: What should you remember when doing activities that involve boys and girls like you? Respect each other. 0 000 000 00 0 1 2 3 4 5 + + + + 4 000 + 300 + 50 + 8 15 275 30 000 + 6 000 + 500 + 50 + 7 63 254 10 000 + 1 000 + 700 + 10 + 8 15 454 10 000 + 5 000 + 400 + 50 + 4
  • 42. 36 3. Generalization What should you know first when writing numbers in expanded form? (Place value of each digit.) After the place value, what should you find next? (The value of each digit.) Now how do we write a number in expanded form? (Write it as a sum of the values of digits.) C. Application Write the underlined number in expanded form. 1.Mr. Simon harvested four thousand fifteen coconuts from his farm. His brother harvested three thousand two hundred twelve. How many coconuts did they harvest together? 2. The gas station in Fourth Street sold fourteen thousand one hundred twenty-six litres of gasoline. The station in Fifth Street sold nine thousand six hundred forty-one litres. How many litres did they sell in all? 3. Two basketball games were played at the Bagong Lakas Sports Complex. In the first game, ten thousand twelve tickets were sold. In the second game, eleven thousand one hundred twenty-three tickets were sold. How many tickets were sold? 4. The mayor wanted to know the number of people in two barangays. Barangay Masagana reported 14 826 people. Barangay Masikap reported 12 975 people. What is the total number of people in the two barangays? 5. Roxas City Lions club had a benefit show for the deaf and blind. They sold out blue tickets worth 11,450 and red tickets worth 18,796. How much worth of tickets were sold out? IV. Evaluation A. Write in standard form 1) 60 000 + 5 000 + 400 + 30 + 5 _____________ 2) 10 000 + 7 000 + 800 + 70 + 6 _____________ 3) 70 000 + 8 000 + 900 + 10 + 2 _____________ 4) 90 000 + 1 000 + 200 + 30 + 4 _____________ 5) 50 000 + 4 000 + 300 + 20 + 1 _____________ B. Write in expanded form. 1) 16 245 2) 53 748 3) 17 413 4) 13 765 5) 35 174 6) 14 321 7) 28 999 8) 15 846 9) 47 846 10) 13 215 V. Assignment A. Write in expanded form. 1) 20 946 2) 16 259 3) 73 815 10) 25 815 4) 24 343 5) 71 158 6) 26 483 7) 27 364 8) 27 364 9) 26 483
  • 43. 37 B. Write in standard form. 1) 30 000 + 1 000 + 200 + 80 + 5 2) 40 000 + 4 000 + 300 + 90 + 6 3) 10 000 + 3 000 + 200 + 70 + 9 4) 50 000 + 1 000 + 200 + 50 + 7 Look at the chart below. Answer the questions that follow. Barangay Population Katipunan Makabayan Magiting Mabini Mayumi Masagana Mapayapa 15 211 11 313 9 384 8 578 16 321 7 254 5 321 Write in expanded form: 1. biggest population 2. smallest population 3. second biggest population 4. population with the same digit in the thousands and ones 5. the population with the same digit in the ten thousands and thousands place 6. population of Barangay Magiting 7. population of Barangay Masagana Rounding Numbers to the Nearest Tens and Hundreds I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Round off numbers to the nearest tens and hundreds. Psychomotor: Write the rounded form of numbers Affective: Cooperation in group activities II. Learning Content Skill: Rounding numbers to the nearest tens and hundreds Reference: BEC PELC I A.2.1 Materials: number cards, flaglets, bottle of beads, cutouts Value: Cooperation III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Reading of numbers and matching number figures with number words
  • 44. 38 Direction: Distribute flaglets and number cards to the pupils. Ask them to line up in front of the class and show their flaglets one by one. Ask other pupils to match their number cards with the figures. 2. Review Identifying the digit in the tens and hundreds place The teacher flashes some number cards with underlined digits. The pupils will identify the place value of the underlined digit. tens hundreds tens hundreds tens hundreds 3. Motivation a. Show a bottle full of beads. Can we tell the exact number of beads at a glance? About how many beads are there in the bottle? b. Show a picture with a big crowd of people i.e.: watching boxing, baseball tournament, beauty pageant. Describe what you see in the picture. Can you tell the exact number of people watching the activities? About how many people are watching the beauty pageant? the boxing tournament? the baseball tournament? Sometimes there is no need for us to give the exact number. Instead we just tell about how many people or things there are. B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation Use the number line 11 17 25 0 10 20 30 40 50 Find the point for 11. Is it closer to 10 or to 20.? It is closer to 10 Since it is closer to the smaller one we round it down. So 11 rounded to the nearest tens is _____. Find 17. To what number is it closer? 20 or 10? Since it is closer to twenty we round it up. So 17 rounded to the nearest tens is _____. Twenty-one five hundred eighty- three six hundred forty- seven One hundred seventy-four 583 647 21 86 174 492 1 285 3 692 578 69 364
  • 45. 39 Find 25. Where is it located? It is halfway between 20 and 30. When a number is halfway between the two tens, round it up to the higher tens. So 25 rounded to the nearest tens is _____. Find the point for 130. Is it closer to 100 or to 200? It is closer to 100. Shall we round it down or round it up? So 130 rounded to the nearest hundreds is ______. Find the point for 280. Is it closer to 200 or 300? 280 is closer to 300. Shall we round it down or round it up? So 280 rounded to the nearest hundreds is ______. 2. Guided Practice a. Work in Pairs Distribute number cards and cutouts with the words round down and round up written on them to each pair. Ask the pupils to match the number cards with the cutouts and arrange them on top of their desks. The 1 st pair to come up with the correct answers wins. Remind them that each member should cooperate with one another to win the game. b. Game – Can You Find Me The teacher arranges cutouts on the chalkboard. Ask the pupils to look for the answers to the following questions from the cutouts arranged on the chalkboard. 1. Which is the smallest 3 digit-number that can be rounded to 200? 2. Which is the highest 3 digit-number that can be rounded to 500? 3. What number can be rounded down to 80? 4. Which number can be rounded up to 70? 5. What is the number that is halfway between 50 and 60? 6. Which number can be rounded to 60? 84  80 round down 261  300 round up
  • 46. 40 C. Generalization How do we round off numbers? Why do we round off numbers? To round off numbers : 1. Look for the digit of the place value to which the number is to be rounded. 2. Check the digit to its right. If it is 4 or below, round the number down. If it is 5 or above, round it up. 3. Change to zeros all the digits to the right. IV. Evaluation A. Round off each number in the box to the nearest tens or hundreds. Write it in the correct column. 40 50 60 70 80 100 200 300 400 500 B. Match the numbers with their rounded form by using a line. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6 56 72 81 68 143 273 195 78 385 64 361 456 32 ROUND OFF TO 649 476 73 195 42 11 50 40 600 200 10 500 70
  • 47. 41 V. Assignment A. Round off to the nearest place value indicated. 1) 392 2) 85 3) 751 4) 91 5) 638 6) 1 783 7) 2 645 8) 7 288 9) 6 924 10) 5 763 Rounding Numbers to the Nearest Thousands I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Round numbers to the nearest thousands and ten thousands Psychomotor: Write the rounded form of numbers Affective: Keep oneself physically fit II. Learning Content Skill: Rounding numbers to the nearest thousands and ten thousands Reference: BEC PELC I- A-2.2 Materials: number line, cutouts, chart, flash cards Value: Physical Fitness III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Identifying the place value of each digit of a given number. The teacher flashes some number cards with underlined digit. The pupils write the place value occupied by the underlined digit in their show-me-card and show the answer to the teacher. thousands hundreds ten thousands tens thousands ten thousands thousands 2. Review Rounding off numbers to the tens and hundreds place Game – “Go Fishing” a. The teacher asks the pupils to make a big circle. b. She spreads cutouts of fish on the floor. c. She distributes fishing poles made from sticks and string with magnets tied to the end of the string. d. The pupils will go fishing and they will round off the number in the cutouts to the nearest tens or hundreds. 45 678 4 321 88 765 26 785 54 712 34 567 16 278
  • 48. 42 3. Motivation Have you gone to a gymnasium? Does your school have a gymnasium? Describe a gymnasium? Do you know that you can play basketball, volleyball, table tennis and badminton in this place? Who among you know how to play these sports? Do you know that playing these sports keep a person physically fit? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. The teacher presents a problem. A certain number of people are in a gymnasium watching a volleyball tournament. If the number of people is rounded to 2 000, is it more likely to be 2 400 or 2 600? Why? b. Use of number line 1) Thousands Place 2 000 2 100 2 200 2 300 2 400 2 500 2 600 2 700 2 800 2 900 3 000 Look for 2 400 and 2 600 on the number line. Which number is nearer to 2 000? The numeral 2 400 is nearer to 2 000. So 2 400 rounded off to the nearest thousands is 2 000. 2) Ten Thousands Place 10 000 11 000 12 000 13 000 14 000 15 000 16 000 17 000 18 000 19 000 20 000 Find the point for 18 000. Is it closer to 10 000 or 20 000? Shall we round it up or round it down? 18 000 is nearer to 20 000 so we round it up. 18 000 rounded off to the nearest ten thousands is 20 000. The teacher gives other examples in rounding off numbers to the nearest thousands and ten thousands. 34 283 428 78 66 853
  • 49. 43 Using the number line show how the following numbers are rounded off to the nearest thousands and ten thousands. 1) 3 500 2) 6 543 3) 89 134 4) 94 683 5) 87 391 2. Guided Practice a. Work in Pairs Each pair will be given some exercises to work on. After answering them, the pupils will write their answers on the board. The pair with the most number of correct answers will be given a “yes clap”. Round off to the place indicated. 1) 4 329 2) 69 125 3) 8 149 4) 89 134 5) 71 592 6) 33 781 7) 56 342 8) 8 241 9) 45 678 b. Matching Game – Work in Triads Match the numbers with their rounded form. Each triad will be given a copy of the activity sheets. The pupils match the numbers with their rounded form by using a line. The first triad to submit the most number of correct answers wins the game. 1) 8 241 a. 5 000 2) 71 592 b. 70 000 3) 69 125 c. 8 000 4) 3 378 d. 4 000 5) 94 705 e. 7 000 6) 8 749 f. 3 000 7) 54 342 g. 60 000 8) 7 248 h. 9 000 9) 4 329 i. 50 000 10) 4 653 j. 90 000 3. Generalization How do you round off numbers? 1. Look for the digit of the place value to which the number is to be rounded. 2. Check the digit to its right. If it is 4 or below, round down the number. If it is 5 or above, round it up. 3. Change to zero all the digits to the right. C. Application Encircle the correct answer. 1. Which is the smallest four-digit number that can be rounded off to 1 000? a. 1 634 b. 1 310 c. 1 536 d. 1 258 2. Which is the largest five-digit number that can be rounded off to 10 000? a. 14 195 b. 13 795 c. 15 681 d. 12 831
  • 50. 44 3. Which is the smallest five-digit number that can be rounded off to 30 000? a. 29 453 b. 34 467 c. 32 781 d. 24 938 IV. Evaluation A. Round off each number to the place indicated. Write the letter of the correct answer. ______1) 5 419 a. 3 000 b. 4 000 c. 5 000 d. 6 000 ______2) 2 937 a. 3 000 b. 4 000 c. 5 000 d. 6 000 ______3) 47 324 a. 40 000 b. 50 000 c. 60 000 d. 70 000 ______4) 82 181 a. 70 000 b. 80 000 c. 90 000 d. 100 000 ______5) 6 263 a. 4 000 b. 5 000 c. 6 000 d. 7 000 B. Round off the answer to the nearest thousands or ten thousands 1. Mt. Apo is 2 954 metres high. About how many metres high is Mt. Apo? ________ 2. The Philippines has about 7 100 islands, 2 773 of them have names. About how many thousands are the islands with names? __________ 3. The average number of pupils in our school is 4 268. About how many pupils are there in our school? ________ V. Assignment 1. Round off each number to the nearest Thousands Ten Thousands a) 23 418 b) 76 163 c) 89 246 d) 15 102 e) 52 813 Odd and Even Numbers I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Tell when a number is odd or even Psychomotor: Write odd or even numbers Affective: Work cooperatively with others. II. Learning Content Skills: Telling when a number is odd or even Writing odd or even numbers Reference: BEC PELC I- A.3 Materials: cutouts, pictures, counters, show-me-board Value: Cooperation
  • 51. 45 III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Division basic facts with 2 as divisor. 2. Review 1. The teacher flashes a number card. 2. The pupils write the answers on their show-me-board. 3. The pupils show the answers to the teacher by raising the show-me-board over their heads. Direction – Look for a pattern and write the missing number. EXAMPLES 3. Motivation Acting out the problem The teacher calls on 2 pupils, then asks another pupil to give the 4 cupcakes equally to the 2 pupils. Ask: How many cupcakes does each child get? Is there a leftover? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Analysis of example 1. What division sentence can we make out of the 4 cupcakes divided equally among 2 pupils? 4 ÷ 2 = 2 2. Is there any remainder? 3. The teacher calls on 2 pupils at a time and distribute candies to them. a. 5 candies ÷ 2 pupils How many candies will each pupil receive? Is there a leftover? 2, 4 ___, 8, ___, 12, ___,___, 18, ___, 22 6, 10, 14, 16, 20 1, 3 ___, ___, ___, 11, ___, 15, ___, ___, 21 5, 7, 9, 13, 17, 19 24, ___, 28, ___, 32, ___, ___, 38, ___, ___, 44 26, 30, 34, 36, 40, 42 53, ___, 57, ___, 61, ___, ___, 67, ___ 55, 59, 63, 65, 69
  • 52. 46 b. 6 candies ÷ 2 pupils c. 7 candies ÷ 2 pupils d. 8 candies ÷ 2 pupils e. 9 candies ÷ 2 pupils f. 10 candies ÷ 2 pupils g. 11 candies ÷ 2 pupils h. 12 candies ÷ 2 pupils Write the corresponding division sentence beside each exercise. 5 candies ÷ 2 pupils 5 ÷ 2 = 2 remainder 1 6 candies ÷ 2 pupils 6 ÷ 2 = 3 7 candies ÷ 2 pupils 7 ÷ 2 = 3 remainder 1 8 candies ÷ 2 pupils 8 ÷ 2 = 4 9 candies ÷ 2 pupils 9 ÷ 2 = 4 remainder 1 10 candies ÷ 2 pupils 10 ÷ 2 = 5 11 candies ÷ 2 pupils 11 ÷ 2 = 5 remainder 1 12 candies ÷ 2 pupils 12 ÷ 2 = 6 Let’s make a table and organize our data. From our division sentences, write all the numbers that can be divided exactly by 2 under column A, and those with remainders under column B. Ask: Describe the numbers in column A, in column B. What do you call the numbers in column A? column B? A B 4 6 8 10 12 3 5 7 9 11 Numbers in column A are called even numbers, those in column B are odd numbers. b. Use the cutouts Rosita picked 13 ripe guavas. She gave each of her 6 friends 2 guavas. Did she give away all the guavas? Ask the pupils to draw the problem. Write a division sentence for the problem. 13 ÷ 2 = 6 remainder 1 Ask the same questions for exercises b to h.
  • 53. 47 What kind of number is 13, odd or even? Why? The teacher uses the same procedure with other numbers, using different kinds of fruits. Let the pupils read the numbers. . What do you notice about the remainder when odd numbers are divided by 2? The remainder is always 1. c. Working in Triads Use the number line 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Write a division sentence for the illustration. 14 ÷ 2 = 7 Can 14 be divided exactly by 2? Why? What kind of number is 14, odd or even? How about 13? How do you classify zero? Why? Provide more exercises on the number line. 2. Guided Practice a. Group the pupils into Learning Barkada’s. Copy the drawing and color the even numbers blue and the odd numbers red. Remind the LB members to work cooperatively with each other. After the activity, ask each group how they did their activity. Is it good to cooperate with the group in doing an activity? Why? b. Game – “PICK ME OUT” The teacher distributes number cards to the pupils. The 1 st pupil to come up with the correct answer wins the game.
  • 54. 48 Study the numbers inside the box then put check if it is even and cross if odd numbers. 8 18 7 14 60 53 55 69 27 65 47 52 72 67 68 76 27 57 65 62 3. Generalization Differentiate odd from even numbers. Can you think of the uses of odd and even numbers in our everyday life? C. Application A. Classify the numbers below. Write them in appropriate column. Even Odd 840 4 638 5 478 9 431 3 509 125 7 243 9 705 1 002 4 574 3 476 3 817 4 901 8 426 3 012 B. How many can you find? 1. An odd number plus an even number is what kind of number? 2. An odd number plus an odd number is what kind of number? 3. How many pairs of even numbers can you find whose sum is 12? 4. 1 and 3 are two consecutive odd numbers, 2 and 4 are two consecutive even numbers. The sum of two consecutive even numbers is 26. What are the two numbers? 5. What is the sum of the even numbers less than 30? 6. The sum of two even numbers is what kind of number? IV. Evaluation Write E if the number is even and O if it is odd. Numbers which can be divided by 2 without a remainder are called even numbers. Numbers which have a remainder of 1 when divided by 2 are odd numbers.
  • 55. 49 1) 4 639 ________ 2) 307 + 283 = ________ 3) 5 634 ________ 4) 278 ÷ 13 = _______ 5) 152 + 10 _______ 6) 312 ÷ 3 = _______ 7) 75 + 13 = ________ 8) 4 928 ________ 9) 3 464 ________ 10) 5 x 20 = ________ V. Assignment A. Write on the blank if the number is even or odd then give the next greater number for each. 1) 331 ____ ____ 2). 3 827 ____ ____ 3) 9 654 ____ ____ 4) 573 ____ ____ 5) 8 306 ____ ____ 6) 1 836 ____ ____ 7) 204 ____ ____ 8) 4 570 ____ ____ 9) 9 282 ____ ____ 10) 8 537 ____ ____ B. Do what each item tells you to do. 1. List all even numbers between 310 and 320. 2. Write all odd numbers larger than 31 but less than 50. 3. Write a 2-digit odd number between 17 and 20. Reading Money in Symbols through 1,000/ Writing Money Value through 1,000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Read money in symbols through 1,000 Psychomotor: Write money value through 1,000 Affective: Practice the habit of being thrifty/spending money wisely II. Learning Content Skills: Reading money in symbols through 1,000 Writing money value through 1,000 Reference: BEC PELC IA.4.1-4.2 Materials: real or play money, money chart, show-me-board Value: Thrift/Spending money wisely III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Divide the class into four or five groups. Assign a leader. Ask them to form a circle. The leader will ask his members to read the money symbols. When the members read them properly, they will be allowed to sit. (Note – 1 to 100 only).
  • 56. 50 2. Review Write the following numbers (teacher reads the following) 1. three hundred ninety six 2. eight hundred forty five 3. thirty nine thousand six hundred 4. seventy five thousand nine hundred one 5. two hundred thousand five hundred one 3. Motivation (Storytelling) Have the children listen to the story. b. What does Mother do every Saturday? c. What does she do with the rest of her money? d. Why do you think Mother saves money? Do you also save money? Why? B. Developmental Activities/Lesson Proper 1. Presentation a. Present the different denominations for Philippine money (bills & coins). Use play or real money. Ask first the pupil to read the different denominations. What is the symbol for peso? for centavo? b. Make several combinations out of the denominations presented. Then ask the pupils to read. 2. Guided Practice a. Divide the class into 4 groups. Each group will play mini-store. Teacher will give each group a certain amount of play money. Then the group will look for the items that can be bought from their money. The group with more correct items bought wins. Mother goes to market every Saturday. She buys fruits, vegetables, fish and other foods. Then she keeps the rest of her money in a saving box. 1000 500 200 100 50 20 5 1 25 c 10 c 5 c 10
  • 57. 51 Items Price electric fan T-shirt pants shorts shoes cup belt 950 299 555 420 875 320 180 b. Play a Game (at this point the pupils will have to read and write money values in symbols) Show folded empty wrappers of candies. Inside the wrappers are certain amount of money. Ask each pupil from the group to write the amount on the show-me-board. The group with the highest points wins. Examples: 3. Generalization How do we write money values? Why is there a need to write the values of money clearly? Application Write the total amount for each set. 1. 2. 500 200 200 100 3. 100 5 4. 200 20 2 5. 200 100 100 20 20 IV. Evaluation Give the missing numbers. 1. 150.25 means _______ pesos and _______ centavos 2. 212.75 means _______ pesos and _______ centavos five hundred pesos and fifty centavos 675 pesos and 30 centavos 415 pesos and 50 centavos 500 200 100 5 5 We write money values using the centavo sign (c) or peso sign ( ).
  • 58. 52 3. 763.50 means _______ pesos and ________ centavos 4. 874.25 means _______ pesos and ________ centavos 5. 946.50 means _______ pesos and ________ centavos Write on the blank spaces the number of paper bills and coins equivalent to each of the amount indicated on the left. 1. 1,000 a. _____ five hundred-peso bill and _____ one hundred peso bills b. _____ five hundred-peso bill 2. 500 a. _____ one hundred-peso bills b. _____ fifty-peso bills 3. 200 a. _____ two hundred-peso bills b. _____ one hundred-peso bills 4. 330 a. _____ two hundred-peso bill _____ one hundred peso-bill _____ ten peso-bills 5. 990 a. _____ five hundred-peso bill _____ two hundred-peso bills _____fifty-peso bill _____ ten-peso coins V. Assignment Fill in the blanks with the correct amount to complete each sequence. 1. 500, ________, 700, 800, ________ 1000 2. 150, 250, 350, ________, ________, 650 3. 225, 325, ________, ________, ________, 725 4. 520, 540, ________, ________, ________, 620 5. 110, 210, 310, ________, ________, ________ Comparing Values of the Different Denomination of Coins/Bills through 1,000 I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Compare values of the different denominations of coins and bills through 1,000 Psychomotor: Show equivalent amount of different denominations through 1,000 Count money values with speed and accuracy Affective: Say thank you after receiving gifts II. Learning Content Skill: Comparing Values of the Different Denomination of Coins/Bills through 1,000 Reference: BEC PELC A. 4.3 Materials: Philippine money, play money, flash cards, charts Value: Gratitude
  • 59. 53 III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill Give each pupil cards with written symbols. As the teacher flashes the cards like the ones below, the pupils will raise the card appropriate to the mathematical sentence. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 2. Review Write the money values in symbols. 1. + + + 2. + + + 3. nine hundred fifty pesos and fifty centavos 4. seven hundred seventy-eight pesos and twenty-five centavos 5. one thousand pesos 3. Motivation Problem opener: Show real money while presenting this problem. Last Christmas Edmar’s godparents gave him . Allyssa’s godparents gave her    50.00 100.00 2 ten-peso bills 30 &50 5 twenty-peso bills 100 sixty five pesos 75.00 500 pesos 100 pesos 50 pesos 5 pesos 35 pesos 100 pesos 50 pesos 20 pesos 500 100 100 50 1 000 50 sixty-five pesos
  • 60. 54 Ask: Did you also receive Christmas gifts from your godparents? What did you say after you received such gift? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Present the situation used in the motivation. Put the real money in a pocket chart. Edmar received 750 while Alyssa received 1 000. Let us compare the amounts. Use >, < or =. Which is more, 750 or 1 000? Which is less? b. Present this chart. The chart shows the savings of six persons in a bank. Depositor Savings 1. Josie 2. Agnes 3. Laura 4. Alma 5. Mariz 6. Gally 595.00 300.00 650.00 1,000.00 995.00 650.00 Ask: Who has the biggest savings? Who has the least savings? Who have the same savings? Compare: 650 and 650 595 and 1,000 300 and 650 Is the number of digits the same? Is the first digit to the left of each number the same? Which is greater 3 or 6? Now we say 595 < 1,000 650 > 300 How about 650 and 650 ? They are equal. Why did you say that 595 is less than 1,000? 595 is a three-digit number while 1 000 is a four digit number. Thus, 595 has the lesser value. (Compare the other amounts. Do the same process.) How about 650 and 300?
  • 61. 55 2. Guided Practice * Working in Four a. Put your play money on your desk. b. Look at the money the teacher puts in the pocket chart. c. Show me the equivalent amount of money. = The pupils may give as many combinations. (Put more bigger amount like 1,000, 500, 100 then do the same process. * Working in Dyads Play “Higher or Lower”. On the board are covered money values. Uncover the squares one by one. Write “Higher or Lower” on show-me-board, if the next amount is higher or lower than the previous one. Inside 100 95.50 205 1,000 950.50 801.00 715.00 650.00 540.75 * Working in Triads Give the amount that is 500 greater than each of the following: 1. 150 ____________ 4. 478.10 ____________ 2. 325 ____________ 5. 300.00 ____________ 3. 70.85 ____________ Give the amount that is 100 less than each of the following: 1. 1,000 ____________ 4. 555 _____________ 2. 425 _____________ 5. 325 _____________ 3. 628 _____________ 3. Generalization How do you compare money values? Remember: 1. Study the amounts of money. If the first digit of the two amounts are the same, compare their second digits or the next digits. 2. The number with the greater digit has the greater value. 3. The more digits the money value has, the greater its value. Why is it important to know how to compare the values of money? 200 50 50 50 50 100 100
  • 62. 56 C. Application Compare the following. Write >, < or =. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. IV. Evaluation A. Read the situation below. Answer the questions that follow. Nora went shopping at La Villa Department Store. She bought the following items: a pair of ladies shoes a dress a bag a towel a pair of slippers 550 450 399 250 169 Fill in the blank with more or less. 1. a bag costs _______ than the towel. 2. a pair of shoes costs _______ than the dress 3. a dress costs _______ than the bag 4. a towel costs _______ than the pair of shoes 50 100 10 20 20 100 10 500 500 1,000 10 30 5001010 200 200 50 50 20 500 00 5 200 100 50 20 10
  • 63. 57 B. Write <, > or = on the blank. 1. seven 10-peso bills _____ 800 2. 200 _____ twenty 10-peso bills 3. four 50-peso bills ______ 200 4. ten 100-peso bill _____ 900 5. two 500-peso bill _____ 800 V. Assignment A. Write the amount that is: 1. 100 greater than 623 __________ 2. 50 greater than 645 ___________ 3. 300 greater than 500 __________ 4. 400 lesser than 1,000 ___________ 5. 225 lesser than 725 ____________ B. Write >, < or = on the blanks. 1. 100 + 100 + 100 _____ 300 2. three 20-peso bills _____ two 50-peso bills 3. 955 _____ 595 4. 1,000.00 _____ 100 5. 99 _____ 59 6. 678 _____ 876 7. 345 _____ 100 + 100 + 10 + 5 8. 498 _____ 894 9. ten 50-peso bills _____ five 100-peso bills 10. six-peso coins _____ six 100-peso bills Reading and Writing Roman Numbers (L to C) I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Read and write Roman numbers from L to C Psychomotor: Give the value of Roman numerals from L to C in Hindu-Arabic and vice-versa Affective: Realize that animals should be loved and taken care of II. Learning Content Skills: Reading and writing Roman Numbers from L to C Giving the value of Roman numbers from L to C in Hindu-Arabic and vice-versa Reference: BEC PELC IA 5.1.1 Materials: charts, picture of a ranch Value: Love and care for animals III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities
  • 64. 58 1. Drill Compare the values of the following. Use >, < or = 1. 565 ____ 400 + 165 2. 250 ____ 350 3. 500 ____ 456 4. 150 ____ 75 + 60 5. 78 ____ 10 + 30 2. Review Game between Boys and Girls (The first to complete changing the numbers to Roman or Hindu-Arabic wins the game.) 3. Motivation Have you been to Manila? What places in Manila have you enjoyed visiting? Let the pupils share their experiences. The teacher will show the picture of Manila City Hall Clock Tower. How do you describe the tower? Can you tell the time by that clock? XXXVIIXXXV XVI 34 27 XXV 29 29 XL XXXIX 45 36 28 XLIV
  • 65. 59 B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation Let us pretend that we are in a ranch. Cesar, a rancher is counting the animals. He was asked by his master to prepare the list in Roman and Hindu-Arabic numbers. Here is the list. Animal Roman Numeral Hindu-Arabic Numerals sheep XCIX 99 Cow C 100 Goat LXXXVII 87 Carabao LXXV 75 Horse LXVI 66 Chicken LXXX 80 Turkey XCV 95 Duck LXXVIII 78 Pig LIV 54 Lead the class in reading the chart. Ask: How do we write 87 in Roman numbers? What symbol comes first? A symbol of higher value or a symbol of lower value than the next? What do we do with the values? Add or subtract? How do we write 99 in Roman numbers? Ask the same questions for the remaining numbers. Can we use V and L 3 times? Why? 2. Guided Practice Group the students into four. Have them do the activities inside the envelope which the teacher will give them. Group 1 Complete the ladder by changing the Hindu-Arabic numerals to Roman numerals. Write your answer at the steps above the number. 55 64 73 82 91 59 90 54 89 66 78 77 67 86 56 95 81 72 63 54
  • 66. 60 Group 2 (For a group with more bright pupils) Complete the number in series. LI, LII, LIII, ____, ____, LVI, ____, LVIII, ____, LX LXI, ____, LXIII, ____, LXV, LXVI, ____, ____, ____, LXX LXXXI, LXXXII, LXXXIII, LXXXIV, ____, ____ XC, ____, ____, XCIII, XCIV, ____, ____, XCVII, XCVIII, ____, C Group 3 Match column A with column B A B 1. LXXX a. 51 2. LI b. 62 3. LXII c. 73 4. LXXIII d. 84 5. LXXXIV e. 95 6. XCV f. 100 7. LXXIX g. 57 8. LXVIII h. 68 9. LVII i. 79 10. C j. 80 k. 78 Group 4 Complete the puzzle below. Write the numbers in Roman numerals 1 C 2 L X X V 3 L X 4 X 5 L X X X 6 X C 7 X I 8 L X V 3. Generalization How do we find the value of a Roman number from L to C? Give examples wherein these Roman numbers are used? Across Down 1) 100 2) 71 2) 75 3) 70 3) 60 4) 95 4) 10 5) 50 5) 80 6) 20 6) 90 7) 11 8) 65
  • 67. 61 Remember: 1. The Roman numbers are written in capital letters. Roman numbers I V X L C Hindu-Arabic 1 5 10 50 100 2. Add if the symbols are repeated. The letters I and X can be repeated up to three times only. Example: II = 1 + 1 = 2 XX = 10 + 10 = 20 III = 1 + 1 + 1 = 3 XXX = 10 + 10 + 10 = 30 3. Add if the symbol of greater value is followed by a symbol of lesser value. Example: LV = 50 + 5 = 55 LXI = 50 + 10 + 1 = 61 4. Subtract when a symbol of lesser value is placed before a symbol of greater value. Example: IX = 10 – 1 = 9 XC = 100 – 10 = 90 Note: Only letter I and X can be placed before a symbol of greater value. C. Application Write the answer in Roman numerals. - Ray used 25 stones. Ed doubled that number. How many stones did they use in all? - Jim has 94. How do you write 94 in Roman numerals? - Carlos had 95. He bought a notebook for 23. How much does he have left? - Mother went to the supermarket. She bought 12 cans of milk, 14 cans of biscuits and 40 cans of sardines. How many cans of groceries did she buy in all? - In a classroom there are 33 boys and 55 girls. How many pupils are there in all? IV. Evaluation * Match column A with column B. Write the letter on the blank. A B ___1) 67 a. LXXV ___2) 78 b. LXVII ___3) 89 c. LXXVIII ___4) 94 d. XCIV ___5) 75 e. LXXXIX ___6) 93 f. XCVI ___7) 59 g. LXXVIII ___8) 78 h. LXXXIV ___9) 84 i. LIX ___10) 96 j. LXVIII k. XCIII
  • 68. 62 V. Assignment Look for the things inside and outside your house which are less than 101. List them down. Follow the format below QUANTITY THINGS ROMAN NUMERALS HINDU-ARABIC NUMERALS Reading and Writing Roman Numbers (C to D) I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Read and write Roman numbers from C to D Psychomotor: Give the value of Roman numerals from C to D Affective: Practice ways of taking care of the sea II. Learning Content Skill: Reading, writing and giving the value of Roman Numbers from C to D. Reference: BEC PELC IA. 5. 1. 2 Materials: textbooks, chart, trees drawn on illustration board Value: Taking care of the sea III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill (Roman numeral I to L) Game “Picking Fruits” (Two groups) Call on pupils and ask them to pick pictures of fruits with Roman numerals written at the back. If the child reads it correctly, he gets the fruit. The group with the most number of fruits picked is the winner. (The teacher should make a drawing of a tree and cutout of fruits then write at the back of the fruits the Roman numeral I to L.)
  • 69. 63 2. Review Write True if the statement is correct. If it is incorrect write the correct Roman numeral. a. XCIX = 99 b. XCIV = 96 c. LXXXV = 85 d. LXIII = 62 e. LXXVII = 77 3. Motivation What do you notice about our sea? Is it still clean? Who contributed much to the pollution of our sea? What should you do to lessen sea pollution? B. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. The pupils of Paye Elementary School, through the guidance of their teacher-in-charge, Mr. Galileo L. Go, participated in the Worldwide Coastal Clean-Up Day. He asked them to make a listing of the waste materials they picked. The listing is as follows: Waste Materials Roman Numeral Hindu-Arabic Numerals Candy wrappers CDXCV 495 Cans CCCLXXVIII 378 Shampoo sachet wrappers CCLIV 254 Disposable glass D 500 Disposable spoons CLXXXIII 183 Disposable fork CDLXII 462 b. Ask: Did the pupils of Paye Elementary School show care for the sea? c. Lead first the pupils in reading the Roman numerals with their corresponding Hindu- Arabic numerals. d. Ask: How do we write 495 in Roman numerals? Which symbol comes first, the symbol with smaller or bigger value? Do we add or subtract the value? Let’s look at how we write 200 and 300. Up to how many times are we going to repeat C? Why? Discuss also the other numbers. 2. Guided Practice a. Game: “Search Me” 1. Group the pupils into 4. 2. Give each group two boxes, one box containing Hindu-Arabic numerals and the other with Roman numerals. 3. Get one from any box, then search for the equivalent in the other box. 4. Paste your work on a Manila paper.
  • 70. 64 b. Working in Dyads Fill in the box with the correct number that is equivalent to the number on the opposite box. Roman numerals Hindu-Arabic numerals 3. Generalization How do we write 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 in Roman numerals? Up to how many times are we allowed to repeat C? How about D? Why? Remember: 1. Here is how we write the following numbers in Roman numerals. Hindu-Arabic Roman numeral 100 - C 200 - CC 300 - CCC 400 - CD 500 - D 2. The symbol C can be repeated up to three times only and can be placed before a symbol with a greater value. C. Application Write the following numbers in Roman numerals. 1) 456 2) 148 3) 500 4) 321 5) 348 6). 125 7) 248 8) 302 9) 146 10) 118 IV. Evaluation Write the answer in Roman numerals. 1. This summer, Redentor read 535 pages from 3 Science books. His sister read 230 pages. How many more pages did Redentor read than his sister? 2. Mang Kardo sold 1 000 coconuts. Five hundred twenty-one of them were young coconuts. How many were not young coconuts? 3. Of the 1 035 registered voters in Brgy. Maligaya, 555 are males. How many are females? CCCLVI CCXXII CDXLIV 444 187
  • 71. 65 4. Rudy had 1 240 pineapples to sell. He sold 912 of them. How many pineapples were left? 5. Find the difference of 2600 and 2120. V. Assignment A. Match column A with column B. Column A Column B 1. 478 a. CCCXCIX 2. 254 b. CDLXXVIII 3. 362 c. CLXXXIII 4. 183 d. CCCLXII 5. 399 e. CCLIV B. As a sign of your love and concern for the sea, together with your classmates pick up trashes in the seashore. Make a listing like the one below. Note: up to 500 only TRASH ROMAN NUMERALS HINDU-ARABIC NUMERALS Reading and Writing Roman Numbers from D to M I. Learning Objectives Cognitive: Read and write Roman numbers from D to M Psychomotor: Give the value of Roman numerals from D to M in Hindu-Arabic and vice versa Affective: Participate actively in the different activities II. Learning Content Skill: Reading and writing Roman Numbers from D to M. Reference: BEC PELC I. A. 5. 1.3 Materials: textbooks, fish bowl, picture of coconut, improvised roulette Value: Active participation III. Learning Experiences A. Preparatory Activities 1. Drill “Hook the Fish” Hook one fish from the bowl. Open the rolled paper and do what is asked. It can be done in a contest manner.
  • 72. 66 2. Review “Climb the Coconut Tree” Form 2 groups. Each member of the group will draw one question from the bowl and he will answer it by himself. One correct answer means one step on the tree. The first group to reach the top of the tree wins the game. Sample Questions 1. What is 100 in Roman Numerals? 2. CLX is _____ in Hindu-Arabic. 3. Carlos has one hundred fifty books in his room. What is 150 in Roman numerals? 4. What is 400 in Roman numerals? 5. What will you add to C to make it 300? 6. Write 200 in Roman numerals. 7. There are 278 pupils in Silangan Elementary School. Write 278 in Roman numerals. 8. 250 + 100 is what in Roman numerals. 9. 900 – 450 = _______Write the difference in Roman numerals. 10. D – CL = ______ Write the difference in Hindu-Arabic. Example of problem written on the rolled paper. Change to Hindu-Arabic LI LXXV LXXXVI C
  • 73. 67 3. Motivation Song: Math Time (It’s a small World) Oh its Math time after all 3x Come together and come all There is just one class We enjoy a lot Where our mind think hard And compute so much Though the drills are so fast And the problem so tough We enjoy our class in Math. C. Developmental Activities 1. Presentation a. Before the year ends, Mr. Cruz makes a listing of the unsold items in the bookstore. Items Hindu-Arabic Numerals Roman Numeral Greeting cards 900 CM Ballpen 800 DCCC Pencil 700 DCC Folders 600 DC Fasteners 999 CMXCIX Paper clips 844 DCCCXLIV b. Lead the pupils in reading both numbers. Ask: What is the symbol for 900? What comes first, the symbol with greater value or the symbol with smaller value than the next? Why? What do we do with the values? Do the same process with the remaining numbers. c. Present another set of examples using roulettes. First, spin the Roman numeral roulette. Have the pupils read the number, then let them change it to Hindu-Arabic. Do this until you finish all the numbers. Follow the same procedure in the Hindu-Arabic roulette. 2. Guided Practice Ask: What should you do during group activities? Do you participate actively? Why is it necessary to participate in every group activity?
  • 74. 68 1. Individual activity Prepare two bowls with strips of paper, one for Hindu-Arabic and one for Roman numerals. Have the pupils pick out one strip from either of the two bowls. Then the pupils find their partner by matching the Hindu-Arabic number or Roman numeral each had picked. 2. Form 4 groups (Provide each group with activity sheets.) Group A Give the missing numbers. 1. CMXCIV = 900 + ____ + 9 = ____ 2. CMXLV = ____ + 40 + 5 = ____ 3. DCCCXII = 500 + ____ + 12 = ____ 4. DCCLXXVII = 700 + 70 + ____ = ____ 5. DCCC = 500 + ____ + 100 + ____ = ____ 6. DCXCVIII = 600 + ____ + 8 = ____ 7. DCLXXVI = ____ + 70 + 6 = ____ 8. CMLXV = 900 + ____ + 5 = ____ 9. DCCIII = ___ + 3 = ____ 10. DCCVI = 700 + ____ = ____ Group B Write the missing numerals in the series. 1. DCCL, DCCLX, ____, ____, ____ 2. DCV, ____, DCXV, ____, DCXXV, ____ 3. DC, ____, ____, CM, M 4. DCCCXV, ____, ____, DCCCXVIII, DCCCXIX, ____ 5. CMVII, CMXIV, ____, CMXXVIII Group C Change the numbers to Roman numerals. Substitute the following for Roman numeral letters. Sing the lines. D – I have two hands the left and the right, M – Hold them up high so clean and bright, C – Clap them softly one, two, three, L – Clean little hands are good to see. X – Mathematics, mathematics (Are you sleeping?) V – How it thrills, how it thrills, I – It is so exciting and so interesting. I love Math. (2x) 1) 654 6) 505 2) 785 7) 955 3) 965 8) 833 4) 100 9) 550 5) 841 10) 660 Group D 1. Change to Roman numerals. Substitute the following movements for the letters. I – jump once V – clap two times X – stamp your feet L – sway your hips C – turn around M – waive your hands two times D – sit down Say first the letter before you do the action 1) 765 2) 886 3) 706 4) 920
  • 75. 69 5) 570 6) 954 7) 528 8) 789 9) 803 10) 940 3. Generalization What is the symbol for 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000? What did we add to D to make 600, 700, 800? What operation is involved here? What did we put before M to make it 900? What operation is used here? How many times are we allowed to write D? How about M? a. The symbol M means 1000. b. We can repeat the symbol C up to three times only and add the value of each. Example: CC = 100 + 100 = 200 CCC = 100 +100 + 100 = 300 c. We add when a symbol of greater value is followed by a symbol of lesser value. Example: DC = 500 + 100 = 600 DCC = 500 + 100 + 100 = 700 DCCC = 500 + 100 + 100 + 100 = 800 d. We subtract when a symbol of lesser value is placed before a symbol of greater value. Example: CM = 1 000 – 100 = 900 Note: 1. Only letters I, X and C can be placed before a symbol of greater value. 2. Only letters I, X, C and M can be repeated up to three times D. Application Form 4 groups. Assign a leader and a recorder to record the correct responses of each pupil. Mechanics: The pupils sit in a circle. The game leader flashes a card and asks his member to read first. The pupil then gives the equivalent Roman numeral. If he is not able to give the correct answer others will do it. A pupil should have at least 5 points to win the game. 654 786 945 513 983 846 762 940 831 678
  • 76. 70 IV. Evaluation Match column A with column B. 1) 875 2) 623 3) 642 4) 901 5) 835 6) 952 7) 862 8) 960 9) 599 10) 999 a. DCCCXXXV b. CMI c. DCXLII d. DCXXIII e. DCCCLXXV f. CMXCIX g. DXCIX h. CMLX i. DCCCLXII j. CMLII V. Assignment Change the numbers to Roman numerals. 1. Nestor wanted to buy a pair of rubber shoes that costs approximately 865.00. 2. During the first day of Palarong Panlalawigan, 998 public officials came. 3. 625 + 346 = _____ Write the total in Roman numeral. 4. Jose receives 550 an hour for repairing computer. 5. 615 + 326 = _____

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