Nature jobsexpo 26sept2012osborne

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  • Social media are go-to places for expertise and advice – that can benefit you both for your own information finding and for proving yourself as an expert in your community. Setting up your own presence allows others to differentiate between you and others with same/similar names or roles and establish yourself in the way you want to. Social media sites rank highly on Google Key figures – CEOs, Senior Managers, Research Councils, Leading Academics and Researchers, etc. are much more accessible via social media allowing you to build a great network. Social Media can lead to collaboration, employment, speaking, and other opportunities. Social media gives you a way to raise your profile for engaging, outreach etc.
  • Nature jobsexpo 26sept2012osborne

    1. 1. Social Media &Managing your Online Presence Nicola Osborne, Social Media Officer http://edina.ac.uk/Naturejobs Careers Expo, London, 26th September 2012
    2. 2. What will be covered here• What is social media?• Why should you use social media?• What tools should you use?• How to manage and maintain your online identity and why it matters• How social media can help you in building your professional profile• Cautionary notes• Examples of good social media practice• Q&A
    3. 3. Introduction
    4. 4. What is Social Media?• Social Media are any websites that allow you to contribute, to engage, to connect with others and are “Web 2.0” tools (O’Reilly 2005).• Relevant examples include: – Blogs (WordPress, Twitter, Tumblr, etc.) – Twitter – YouTube and Vimeo – Facebook – Flickr and similar image sharing sites – Pinterest – Academia.edu – FigShare
    5. 5. Why Use Social Media?• Social Media are go-to spaces for expertise and advice• Setting up your own professional presence allows you to build your own profile in the way you want• Social media sites rank highly on Google, Bing, etc.• Key figures – Principal Investigators, CEOs, Senior Managers, Research Councils, Leading Academics and Researchers, etc. are much more accessible via social media allowing you to build a great network.• Social Media can lead to collaboration, employment, speaking, and other opportunities.• Social media gives you a way to raise your profile for engaging, outreach etc.
    6. 6. What tools should you use?• Blogs are a great way to establish yourself as a knowledgeable credible professional• Twitter is a highly effective way to build your network, to connect with leaders in your field, find peer support and advice, follow key announcements, articles etc.• Video or Audio are super if you want to build up your reputation for speaking, events, media, public engagement, etc.• LinkedIn lets you build a professional profile, establish new collaborations and be found by recruiters• Academia.edu lets you similarly build a professional profile but with a closer tie to publications, connections to others in the sector, research interests etc.• Mendeley and Google Scholar Citations let you raise the profile of publications and find related publications
    7. 7. What should you share?• Your work/research – to the extent that this is acceptable• Quirky or playful content around your work or research• Your professional experience – publications, experience, connections where appropriate (e.g. via LinkedIn)• CHECK ANY EXISTING PRIVACY, NON-DISCLOSURE OR SOCIAL MEDIA POLICIES AND ENSURE YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE OR ACTIVITY COMPLIES.
    8. 8. What should not be shared• Commercially sensitive data or other material your employer/PI would not want shared or that might breach guidelines.• Personal information that might impact on your professional reputation – images of drunken parties, some automatic app updates (e.g. that you are reading “50 Shades of Grey”), old forgotten discussion board rants, hate speech, etc.• Anything you would not want a professional peer, employer, or future employer to see or read.
    9. 9. Blogs: What’s on my Blackboard? http://whatsonmyblackboard.wordpress.com/
    10. 10. Blogs: Cameron Neylon
    11. 11. Blogs: Mary Beard http://timesonline.typepad.com/dons_life/
    12. 12. Facebook: Mr Blobby the Blobfish
    13. 13. Good Examples: Inside Science http://blogs.royalsociety.org/inside-science/
    14. 14. Twitter: Joe Hanson
    15. 15. Reflect on your own identity online• The first thing to do is Google yourself* and see what’s out there…• Are your existing online presences findable and effective?• Look for ways to distinguish yourself from others with similar names/roles.• Look for colleagues, peers, role models in your own or related specialisms – what works well or poorly in their own social media presences?* Or use Bing, Whos talkin, Social Mention, IceRocket, Twitter search, etc.
    16. 16. LinkedIn: Sandra Chapman
    17. 17. Academia.edu: Marta Mirazon Lahr
    18. 18. FigShare: Prabhav Kalaghatgi
    19. 19. Flickr: Francis Rowland
    20. 20. Building your Professional Profile • Decide which tools suit your style, expertise, and time availability • Ensure you complete your profile, use your real name and connect social media to your other online presences. • Share interesting engaging content, use images, build connections to others, engage with the community in social media. • Ensure you keep profiles and presences up to date and relevant and that they represent you fairly and as you want to be seen.
    21. 21. Managing Your Identity OnlineUseful Search Engine• Google: http://www.google.com and Google Blog Search: http://www.google.co.uk/blogsearch/• Bing: http://www.bing.com/ and Bing Social Search: http://www.bing.com/social/• Whos talkin: http://whostalkin.com/• Social Mention: http://www.socialmention.com/• IceRocket: http://www.icerocket.com/• Twitter Search: https://twitter.com/#!/search-home• Topsy: http://topsy.com/Useful Tools for Automatic Checking and Task Management• Google Alerts: http://www.google.com/alerts• Tweetbeep: http://tweetbeep.com/• IFTTT: https://ifttt.com/
    22. 22. Q&A Questions?
    23. 23. Useful Resources• O’Reilly, T. 2005. What Is Web 2.0: Design Patterns and Business Models for the Next Generation of Software. In O’Reilly, 30th September 2005. Available from: http://oreilly.com/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html• Patel, S. 2011. 10 ways researchers can use Twitter. In Networked Researcher, 3rd August 2011. Available from: http://www.networkedresearcher.co.uk/2011/08/03/10-ways-researchers-can- use-twitter/Privacy Settings Links:• Facebook Privacy Settings: http://www.facebook.com/help/privacy• LinkedIn Privacy Settings: http://learn.linkedin.com/settings/• Guide to Google+ Privacy Settings: http://lifehacker.com/5827683/a-guide-to-google%252B-privacy-and- information-control/

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