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Ensuring Continuing Access to Online Scholarly Resources
 

Ensuring Continuing Access to Online Scholarly Resources

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Presentation given by Peter Burnhill, Director of EDINA, at the Knowledge Exchange Workshop, Edinburgh, 9 October 2009.

Presentation given by Peter Burnhill, Director of EDINA, at the Knowledge Exchange Workshop, Edinburgh, 9 October 2009.

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    Ensuring Continuing Access to Online Scholarly Resources Ensuring Continuing Access to Online Scholarly Resources Presentation Transcript

    • Knowledge Exchange: Sustainable Access to Publications & Long-term Preservation Ensuring Continuing Access to Online Scholarly Resources Stewardship & Service, (Open) Access & Preservation, Curation Peter Burnhill Director, EDINA National Data Centre, University of Edinburgh, Scotland UK Knowledge Exchange Workshop Edinburgh, 9th October 2009 1
    • Overview for Talk 1. Welcome • University of Edinburgh & EDINA 2. What we are doing, what we are contributing 1. University of Edinburgh 2. EDINA 3. Agenda: Sustainable Access to Publications & Long term Preservation • How now to ensure that [future] researchers, students & their teachers have continuity of access to the online scholarly resources they need 4. Working together at the ‘network-level’? • at the national or regional level • at the trans-national, global level 5. Examples of Projects & Services: ‘network-level’ activity • PEPRS: piloting an e-journals preservation registry service 6. Our Changing World: Online Services, Author/Reader, Digital Resources • An abstract model 2
    • Warm Welcome, Wearing Two Hats 1. As a member of the directorate of the Information Services at University of Edinburgh 3
    • Warm Welcome 1. As a member of the directorate of the Information Services at University of Edinburgh, on behalf of – Vice-Principal for Knowledge Management, Chief Information Officer & University Librarian – My colleagues: Directors of Libraries, of Computing, AV/Learning Technology and MIS, now in converged divisions of Information Services – Director of Library & Collections Division (Sheila Cannell) 4
    • Warm Welcome 1. As a member of the directorate of the Information Services at University of Edinburgh 2. As Director of EDINA, a JISC National Data Centre – serving staff and students at all UK universities, colleges and research institutions 5
    • The University of Edinburgh … is a long-lived research and teaching institution, c.1582 • Where access to, and care of collections always important: – Library is older than its University, c.1580 6
    • The University of Edinburgh … is a long-lived research and teaching institution, c.1582 • Where access to, and care of collections always important: – Library is older than its University, c.1580 • Where access to, and care of digital content also began early – Joint initiative to set up Edinburgh University Data Library in 1983 – Staff active in IASSIST, www.iassistdata.org, the international assoc. for data librarians and data archivists – With focus on ‘access’ and working with ‘trusted archives’ * cf DANS, DDA, ZA, UKDA (role as Past-President of IASSIST, 1996 - 2001) – Work of the University’s Digital Library in Library & Collections * Including long term care 7
    • The University of Edinburgh … is a long-lived research and teaching institution, c.1582 • access to, and care of collections always important • access to, and care of digital content also began early: joint initiative for Edinburgh University Data Library in 1983 • Led consortium bid to establish Digital Curation Centre in 2004 www.dcc.ac.uk blending digital preservation with data curation * (role as Phase 1 Director, 2004 - 2006) – DCC asked by JISC to investigate LOCKSS; UoE joined the UK LOCKSS Alliance Project led by the DCC (at University of Glasgow) • Joined the CLOCKSS Project that started in 2005/6 – Now acts the Archive Node in Europe since launch of CLOCKSS * (role as Director on CLOCKSS Board) 8
    • Practising stewardship • The CLOCKSS initiative www.clockss.org – Collaborative action by publisher and library communities * deliberately not national libraries * ‘C’ for collaborative/controlled, shared governance, or for closed as in dark archive – focus on long-term and ‘open’ release in event of ‘trigger event’ – World’s leading publishers agree to routine ingest of their digital journal content into global dark archive of 11 long-lived libraries acting as Archive Nodes – Uses the LOCKSS (Lots Of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) technology * that automatically checks across the Archive Nodes on the Internet to ensure bit-consistency and integrity * a ‘private LOCKSS network’, such as could be deployed by any organisation. * Was not intending to speak as CLOCKSS Board member but could provide information as needed 9
    • EDINA, UK National Data Centre • Designated as national data centre in 1995/96 – Governed by a Funding Agreement between HEFCE & University • Mission is “to enhance productivity of research, learning & teaching in higher & further education” – By providing access to resources through a broad range of high quality of online service, 24/7 – By providing assured project competence for R&D • Playing key role for JISC and UK HE&FE community as ‘brick in the wall of virtual digital library’ – helping to contribute understanding & to build components * working with researchers to transform their product into development for new and enhanced services 10
    • research, learning & teaching in UK universities & colleges acting as platform for network-level services & helping to build the JISC Integrated Information Environment Content, UK National Data Centres Tools & Research Infrastructure Councils JISC Collections JISC Sub-Committees UK funding councils for HE & FE
    • A Simple Model of Scholarly Publication (focus on article–length work published in journals) Key User (Reader) Verbs: Author (article) Discover article of interest Locate service on those articles Request permission to use service Publisher Access to service/article article serial issue Libraries and Publishers Licence ... with Licence(s) for electronic provide framework … (online) and print (on-shelf) the traditional £ ‘middleware’/infrastructure’ Library (serial) Reader (article) P.Burnhill, EDINA/JISC, 2005
    • Scholarly Publication: just a matter of publishers, libraries and licences? Publisher article serial issue Libraries and Publishers Licence ... with Licence(s) for electronic provide framework … (online) and print (on-shelf) the traditional £ ‘middleware’/infrastructure’ Library (serial) P.Burnhill, EDINA/JISC, 2005
    • Institutional Provision for Online Access to Publications (Access to article–length work) F o r m Licensed a Online Access £ Publisher article serial issue ILL/ E docdel c Licence Institutional o arrangement n o Library m (serial) y Reader (article)
    • Peer-to-Peer Scholarly Communication - beyond institutional walls F o Author r (article) m a peer review £ Publisher learned article serial society issue E c peer o Licence exchange n o Library m (serial) y Reader (article) Informal: ‘invisible college’ and the ‘gift economy’
    • Will issue of licence by Author for Reader undermine the traditional model? Author * All is Licensed, whether for: (article) •Open Access •Privileged of Membership Access •Payment of Cash Access Publisher [preserved or current content] article serial issue Licence* Library (serial) Reader (article) P.Burnhill, EDINA/JISC, 2005
    • EDINA – ensuring continuity of access 1. ‘archival responsibility’ • especially for value-added & user generated data – OA eprints (Depot) & e-learning materials (Jorum) * the ‘keep-safe’ repository promise – geo-spatial (Digimap); audio-visual (NewsFilm) 18
    • EDINA – ensuring continuity of access 1. ‘archival responsibility’ value-added & user generated data – the ‘keep-safe’ repository promise 2. Services: ‘Sustainable Access to Publications & Long term Preservation’ • ‘Open Access’ Host for CLOCKSS triggered content • Support for the UK LOCKSS Alliance ‘cooperative’ But also • Suncat, national (UK) union catalogue of serials • National OpenURL Router: registry of OpenURL resolvers • Access control: Privilege of membership for licensed content • Developed Shibboleth pilot for UK Access Management Federation • Now Technical (metadata) Operator & JISC Expert Group 19
    • EDINA – ensuring continuity of access 1. ‘archival responsibility’ value-added & user generated data 2. Services ‘Sustainable Access to Publications & Long term Preservation’ 3. Projects ‘Sustainable Access to Publications & Long term Preservation’ JISC-funded: – PEPRS: e-journal preservation registry service [with ISSN-IC] – PeCAN: post-cancellation (licensed) content [JISC Collections] But also OA Repository Junction: discovery/re-routing via registries International Repository Infrastructure for Open Access – SONEX Task Force on deposit, notification and interoperability [with Pablo de Castro (Spanish National Research Council), Mogens Sandfaer (Danish Technical University), Jim Downing (University of Cambridge, UK)] 20
    • Piloting an E-journal Preservation Registry Service PEPRS Project: JISC-funded, two years starting August 2008 – review after 18 months (Feb. 2010) for move into service Partners: EDINA and ISSN International Centre (Paris) – Support of Governing Body and Directors of ISSN Network Purpose: Scope, develop & test a registry service – Establish and test an Information Architecture – Seek consensus across stakeholders – Technical & financial sustainability 21
    • Presentations & Publication 1. JISC Journals Working Group, London, August 2008 2. ISSN National Directors Meeting, Tunis, September 2008 3. NASIG, 24th Annual Conference, Ashville NC, USA, 4 June 2009 4. Library of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 15 September 2009 5. ISSN National Directors Meeting, Beijing, 17 September 2009 6. PARSE.Insight Workshop, Darmstadt, Germany, 21 September 2009 7. … yourselves … P.Burnhill, F.Pelle, P.Godefroy, F.Guy, M.Macgregor, A.Rusbridge & C.Rees Piloting an e-journals preservation registry service. Serials 22(1) March 2009. [UK Serials Group] P.Burnhill Tracking e-journal preservation: archiving registry service anyone? Against the Grain. 21(1) February 2009. pp. 32,34,36 * Intention is to gain international appraisal and support * 22
    • Why a Preservation Registry? • Many schemes emerging to meet challenge • But who is doing what? – How can libraries & policy-makers assess which e-journals are being archived * by what methods? * under what terms of access? • JISC had earlier commissioned a scoping study from Rightscom & Loughborough University – Confirmed expressed need among libraries and policy makers – Warned of potential burden on archiving agencies 23
    • E-Journals PEPRS Scope: Journal and other serial content in digital format – Focus on those serials with the ISSN identifier * If its worth saving, it should have an ISSN Multi-level: article is the information object of desire – Focus on Journal Title-level – Issued Content, ie Volumes (Year) – Articles International: – Matters for the UK * But matters to all countries – Cannot be resolved in (national) isolation 24
    • E-Journals and E-Serials: Scale is large but not vast E-journals and preservation 70,000 66,000 59,549 60,000 50,000 Thousands of journals 40,000 30,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Ulrich ISSN Academic journals 25
    • Preservation PEPRS Scope: digital preservation agencies for journal content Multi-level: – 3rd Party organisations (eg CLOCKSS & Portico; PubMed) – National Libraries * some with legal deposit – Libraries and library consortia (eg UK LOCKSS Alliance) – What they say about themselves – What they record about what they hold – Technology / Triggers / ‘Trustedness’ / Access 26
    • Digital Preservation Agencies in the Pilot * Two 3rd Party Organisations – CLOCKSS – Portico * Two National Libraries (c.f. legal deposit) – British Library (BL) British Library e-Journal Digital Archive – Koninklijke Bibliotheek (KB e-Depot) KB, National Library of the Netherlands * One library cooperative – UK LOCKSS Alliance 27
    • Legal Deposit • Works well with print via legislation and national libraries. • Countries with legislation enacted (or ‘in train’) for e-materials include: Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, UK • But, not all countries (notably USA) • and in UK (& Netherlands?) the legislation is to support voluntary deposit, with restrictions on mode of access 28
    • Registry PEPRS Scope: what is being done by digital preservation agencies for e-journals Multi-level: – Who can register, who decides who… – What should be registered * Ingest pending (agreed), ingest in progress, ingest completion. – Self-statement of methods, using comparable vocabulary International: – Registry must be international / governance & funding – Value of links to CrossRef, Onix for Serials, ISSN etc 29
    • Piloting an Data Model for PEPRS as in Serials vol 22(1) March 2009 E-journals Preservation Registry Service E-J Preservation Registry Service E-Journal METADATA Preservation on preservation action Registry (b) (a) METADATA Digital Preservation Agencies e.g. CLOCKSS, Portico; BL, KB; on extant e-journals UK LOCKSS Alliance etc. Data dependency ISSN Register
    • Data Model for Prototype & Working Demonstrator: (1) obtained subsets of data from ISSN Register and from Preservation Agencies; (2) set up secure system for project purposes; (3) developing prototype / demonstrator Pilot of E-J Preserv Registry Service Project E-Journal Preservation action metadata Preservation Piloting an Registry E-journals Preservation Registry Service E-J metadata Digital Preservation Agencies e.g. CLOCKSS, Portico; BL, KB; UK LOCKSS Alliance etc. ISSN Register
    • Service PEPRS Scope: delivering value for various use communities Multi-use communities: – Librarians – Policy makers and funders – Digital preservation agencies – Publishers – Subscription Agents – etc International: – Action taken in and for the UK – How to provide and sustain an international service 32
    • Project Progress • Abstract Data Model [as shown] – Data implementation model for Project • Sample data & data fields from Archiving Agencies – Blogging workshop for all Project participants. – Seek views on data flows, data fields, vocabularies etc. • Presentations & publications [as shown] • Screenshots from ‘working’ Prototype [coming next] • Development of demonstrator for pilot activity Scheduled by end 2009 • Assessment of demonstrator & future of pilot Scheduled for February 2010 33
    • This is a ‘Prototype’ – being shared by project partners, and may be shown to project associates & the funders (JISC): this shows the Basic Search
    • Success! This shows who is looking after this e-journal This is a ‘mock-up’ based on sample data from the archiving agencies, and using ‘first-cut’ fields
    • What happens when the ISSN entered is a print ISSN Key role for ISSN-L subfield
    • Thoughts and action .. Still early days: • Use E-Journals Register, sourced from ISSN Register – Over 66,000 e-serials now have ISSN • Need to agree what users want to know – descriptors of digital preservation policy & practices • Use network interoperability (to search or to harvest) – for up-to-date, reliable information held by preservation agencies on and statements about policies and coverage • ‘Titles’ is easy, but ‘Holdings’ is difficult! – role for DOI and Onix for Serials? • Ensure that e-journals you care about get an ISSN identifier! – The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) requires it 37
    • Questions and Side Benefits …. • ISSN is devising workflow for case where ISSN has not been assigned for e-serial content that is being preserved. – Including ‘digitised’ print journals – some of which may have a print ISSN but many will not • ISSN Register will benefit from up-to-date publisher information recorded by archiving agencies • Will need to focus on how to record and display ‘holdings’ information on extent of digital content preserved – Years?, issues? Articles??? • If attention is switching from preservation to post-cancellation access, should PEPRS try to adapt? – But that is for a national registry (PeCAN Project) – A national not an international responsibility • How to be an international registry – Managed by UK (JISC), Knowledge Exchange, EU, ISSN-IC ?? 38
    • Re-thinking stewardship for scholarly publications  Central task is to ensure that researchers, students & their teachers have continuity of access to the online scholarly resources they need • First, the Good News! – Researchers & students have online access to journal articles * to read & download: Any-where, Any-time * to search, retrieve, link, analyse and use in interesting ways – digital curation can mean added value • So what’s the Bad News? 39
    • What are we worrying about? What is now available online in digital form may not always be so 1. Digital decay • storage media, software, formats, bit rot etc 2. Web has changed essentials of supply chain • Libraries no longer take custody of key e-journals content * online remotely, not on-shelf locally • Role of libraries as trusted keepers of information disrupted * licensed to access, not sale of content – although all licences and contracts are negotiable • Digital preservation is an an international problem requiring international action • Must to look for ‘network level’ solution – Multiple copies held in multiple places (a network of libraries) 40
    • Challenge to Ensure Continuing Access Long term digital preservation F o Author r Continuity (article) of access Licensed m E-prints a peer Institutional Online review Repositories Access £ Publisher learned article serial society issue ILL/ E docdel c peer o Licence Institutional exchange arrangement n o E-prints m Library Subject (serial) y free to web access Repositories Reader (article) Informal: ‘invisible college’ and the ‘gift economy’
    • The Turbulent Present & User-generated Gifts Preservation F & Other o Access r Author Publisher Services (article) article serial m Role of issue a learned Publisher Licence £ society? engagement Open peer E review? c Web 2.0/3.0: Library o Semantic web (serial) n mash-ups, Blogs. RSS feeds, Wikis Role of Institutional o Institutional arrangement m free to web access Repositories? y peer exchange Reader (article) Informal: ‘invisible college’ and the ‘gift economy’