SDAT Presentation for Downtown Hilo
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SDAT Presentation for Downtown Hilo

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This file contains the slide show presented at the second Public Meeting for the Sustainable Design Assessment Team Program for Downtown Hilo, which was held on May 7, 2009.

This file contains the slide show presented at the second Public Meeting for the Sustainable Design Assessment Team Program for Downtown Hilo, which was held on May 7, 2009.

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  • 1. Hilo, Hawai‘i - SDAT Team Presentation and Recommendations May 5 – 7, 2009
  • 2. What is an SDAT? The Sustainable Design Assessment Team program provides broad assessments to help frame future policies and sustainability solutions.
  • 3. SDAT principals: •Multi-Disciplinary Team •Objective Outsiders •Community Participation
  • 4. Three Elements of Sustainability • Environmental Stewardship • Social Equity Environment • Economic Physical Basis Sense of Development/Growth for Prosperity Place COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY All planning decisions must be assessed based on all three Economics Demand for Equity Products and elements- advances in only Services one, to the detriment of the others, is not sustainable.
  • 5. Checklist of Issues Environmental: Social: Economic: Air Quality Housing / Affordability Revitalization Water Quality / Quantity Public Spaces Diversity Open Spaces Ethnic / Racial Issues Jobs Wildlife Habitat / Demographic Public Services Wetlands Income Shifts Public Policy / Planning Rivers / Streams / Bay Education Agricultural Preservation Flooding and Drought Sense of Community / Place Traffic Congestion Natural Disaster Pedestrian / Bicycle Options Transportation Transit and Land Use Access to Jobs / Housing Energy Efficiency Managing Growth
  • 6. The Heart of Hilo
  • 7. THERE WAS A TIME WHEN THE MOUNTAINS OF HILO WERE BANNED FROM REACHING HILO’S SEAS
  • 8. THE STREAMS THAT ONCE NOURISHED HILO’S HEART HAD NOWHERE TO GO AND AFTER MANY YEARS – THEY DRIED UP
  • 9. THE FISH WERE NOT ABLE TO REACH THE SEAS SO THE SEA BIRDS LEFT HILO FOR THE OTHER ISLANDS IN SEARCH OF FOOD
  • 10. OVER THE YEARS HILO’S HEART - PIKO HARDENED… WHERE THERE WAS ONCE ALOHA, THERE WAS FIRE - AHI AND SMOKE -UAHI
  • 11. …ONE DAY, THEN THE MAKANI AHE AHE WINDS BLEW INTO HILO
  • 12. THE MAKANI BROUGHT ALONG WITH IT THE FLOWERS OF THE ‘ŌHI‘A- LEHUA TREE THAT HELD THE ‘ANO‘ANO (SEEDS) OF CHANGE
  • 13. THESE SEEDS FILLED THE CRACKS THAT COVERED HILO’S HEART
  • 14. …THE MAKANI ALSO BLEW IN THE AO PANOPANO RAIN CLOUDS… …AND IT RAINED FOR MANY MANY DAYS….
  • 15. …IT RAINED SO MUCH THAT THE SEEDS GREW INTO BEAUTIFUL TREES….THE RIVERS KAHAWAI OVERFLOWED AND TORE UP HILO’S HARD COVER…THE HARD COVER FLOWED TOWARDS THE OCEAN AND BREACHED THE BARRIERS …
  • 16. …AS THE MOUNTAINS REACHED TOWARDS THE SEAS…FISH PONDS DOTTED THE ISLAND ONCE AGAIN…THE SEABIRDS RETURNED…AND FLOCKED THE MANY TREES THAT NOW ADORNED HILO’S HEART
  • 17. …AND ONCE AGAIN HILO’S HEART WAS FILLED WITH ALOHA AND GRATITUDE….
  • 18. Defining Sustainability Hawaiian Tradition of Subsistence Kua‘aina: Respect the resources and the spirits of the land, forest and ocean. Take only what is needed from the land, ocean and nature.
  • 19. Defining Sustainability Hawaiian Tradition of Subsistence Hō‘ailona: Observe the natural signs important for a sense of direction and well being. Respect and protect knowledge and skill that has been passed down inter-generationally.
  • 20. Defining Sustainability Hawaiian Tradition of Subsistence Cultural Kīpuka: Sharing + redistribution of resources creates a social environment that cultivates community kinship ties, and support, as well as care for the elderly and prescribed roles for youth.
  • 21. Defining Sustainability Hawaiian Tradition of Subsistence Lōkahi: Unity, harmony, balance. Time spent in the natural environment develops a strong sense of environmental kinship that is the foundation of Hawaiian spirituality.
  • 22. Defining Sustainability Hawaiian Tradition of Subsistence Wahi pana: Develop stewardship and reinforce knowledge about the landscape, place-names, meanings and ancient sites.
  • 23. Historic Preservation & Sustainability • Historic Buildings tell a story of a time in Hilo when we used less energy and resources • Ultimate in recycling • Saves embodied energy • Reduces waste stream to landfill
  • 24. Building Elements • Tall first floors provide natural light deeper into the building • Ventilation in upper walls provide natural ventilation
  • 25. Building Elements • Canopies protect from rain and sun • All elements create a distinctive Hilo streetscape & promote pedestrian activity
  • 26. Building Elements • Mixed uses promote economic activity • Emotional attachments
  • 27. Codes vs Revitalization • Existing codes (zoning, building, urban design guidelines, storm management) make it difficult to restore old buildings • Create new code(s) for downtown – Form based code(s) for new buildings – Designate downtown an historic landmark district – Specify alternate methods, existing Building Code • Education
  • 28. Tsunamis • Tsunamis have changed the shape of Hilo and may do so again. • Hilo has done a good job to make people safe.
  • 29. Resiliency “Resiliency means accepting that this is going to happen at some point in the future, and planning for it today”
  • 30. Everyone wants to keep Hilo, Hilo
  • 31. But, what does this mean?
  • 32. But, what does this mean? •“Old Hawai‘i” •For residents—not tourists •A living place—for many people & activities •Not about the chain store, but the local merchant
  • 33. Many of you do not want Change.
  • 34. Others of you want lots of it.
  • 35. Truth is, you either get the Change you plan for, or the Change that just comes.
  • 36. The EDH 2025 Plan calls for a number of initiatives for Renewal & Growth
  • 37. A few guiding suggestions.
  • 38. The Place as a Brand.
  • 39. Is this shoe more desirable?
  • 40. Or, maybe this one?
  • 41. A brand is an assortment of expectations established by the seller that, once fulfilled, forms a covenant with its buyers. A brand covenant is an implicit guarantee that what consumers see is what they get.
  • 42. What is the brand for Downtown Hilo? scale…material….height…views…a family of styles…..culture & attitude.
  • 43. First principle: That which you do not legally protect you will likely lose. and Second principle: That which you do not define as future development you will likely not get.
  • 44. Third principle: Strong retail is inherently more sustainable
  • 45. Fourth principle: Strong LOCAL brands can be sold to the world.
  • 46. Fourth principle:strong LOCAL brands can be sold to the world.
  • 47. Fourth principle: Strong LOCAL brands can be sold to the world.
  • 48. The Goals: • Become known globally as the "True Hawai‘i", the place where Paradise is lived everyday. • Develop portals for delivering "True Hawai‘i" to shoppers of the world.
  • 49. Protecting & Projecting Downtown Hilo Through Codes
  • 50. Recommendation 1: Protect history and guide development with a form-based code QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 51. Recommendation 1: Protect history and guide development with a form-based code
  • 52. Recommendation 1: Protect history and guide development with a form-based code
  • 53. Recommendation 1: Protect history and guide development with a form-based code
  • 54. View Downtown Hilo as a series of Districts Art + Culture Heart of Hilo Entertainment District Market District
  • 55. Hilo Youth Teens | College Students | Young Adults
  • 56. What we heard Center for Youth Community Sense of Safety and Welcome Hangouts for Teens after school Offerings for University Students
  • 57. Connecting Youth with Downtown Hilo Connections Park Elem. School High School Private  Schools Middle  School Private  Boys+Girls Schools Club
  • 58. Housing and Economic Development
  • 59. Urban Space for Youth • Make downtown family/youth friendly • Restrooms • Youth zone • Sports, arts, activities • Hang outs • Safety, eyes of community • Lighting
  • 60. Housing Accessibility • Housing and economic development • What kind • Where • How • Infill and live /work units • Downtown residents will enhance Hilo. – People can live where there are few stores, but stores cannot exist where there are few people.
  • 61. Mixed Use • Mixed-use residential/other housing • Live work units and co-housing • Single small units • Mixed unit sizes • Courtyard community
  • 62. Housing Options • Communal arrangements • symbiotic
  • 63. Social Equity • Homelessness • Type of homeless • Detox center • What do they need • Screening (for drugs, illness, or even vision)
  • 64. Universal Design • Access for disabled – Progress has been made – Some rough areas • Change Sidewalks to volcanic surface – Chance to unify image while reducing slick surfaces
  • 65. Universal Design • Pedestrian friendly sidewalk design • Volcanic surfacing • Re-do rough spots • Ties in to lighting and image • Move Bayfront highway
  • 66. Economic Incentives • Financing and incentives • Free short term parking • Tax abatements for added value • Tax abatements for housing
  • 67. Sustainable connections
  • 68. FOUR PRINCIPLES • Downtown is a Destination • The Street Network Must Connect, not Divide • Streets are for Everybody • Distinct Parking Strategies for each User
  • 69. 1. Hilo’s Downtown is a Destination • It is not a place to Go To not Pass Through • It is a place to experience • A place that revives all our senses • A place where “Life Slows and Community Grows” • That is Downtown Hilo
  • 70. • Therefore connections to the Downtown must flow into the area not rush by • Slow traffic is safe, good for business, and uses less energy • Slow traffic also allows for many modes of travel – on foot, in strollers, wheelchairs, bicycles
  • 71. REGIONAL GATEWAY HOTELS POTENTIAL TO NEW FISH POND HARBOR DOWNTOWN REGIONAL SCHOOLS POTENTIAL REGIONAL NEW FISH GATEWAY TRANSIT POND LOOP TRANSIT REGIONAL CENTER BIKE PATH EXISTING CIVIC FISH AIRPORT POTENTIAL CENTER POND NEW FISH POND TO UNIVERSITY
  • 72. 2. The Street Network Must Connect - Not Divide • Create new connections into Downtown • Embrace the waterfront where it does not • Make connections where they do not exist • Strengthen pedestrian connections where they are weak
  • 73. 3. Streets for Everybody UNIVERSAL DESIGN • Kūpuna • Children • Bicyclists • Strollers • Sampans • Transit
  • 74. 4. Distinct Parking Strategies • PAID VERSUS FREE • 30 MIN VERSUS ALL- DAY • PARKING TARGETS – Residents – Visitors / Tourists – Employees
  • 75. Sewer and Energy Parking District Long Term Parking Transit Center
  • 76. Vision Plan for Downtown Hilo KE AW E I AI AW N OH PO
  • 77. Actions to Consider • Simplify and consolidate waterfront roads • Develop a plan for parking that allows for shared parking lots, paid parking, timed parking • Establish a close-in shuttle system (sampans?) that connects commuter parking, and park and ride lots to downtown businesses • Establish a larger shuttle system that connects to remote activities such as the harbor, airport, and university to Downtown • Create a wide, safe, and well-designed bike route to Downtown • Consider pedestrian friendly road designs such as woonerfs or ‘shared space’ roadways • Consider returning Keawe and Kino‘ole back to a two-way system • Relocate the Transit Center to a nearby upland location
  • 78. What happens next with the SDAT? • 2-3 Months: SDAT Report delivered to the community • Up to 12 Months: Conference Calls • 12 Months: Visit & Assessment
  • 79. AIA Center for Communities by Design: Contact Information www.aia.org/liv_sdat SDAT@aia.org AIA National Component Center for Communities by Design 1735 New York Avenue NW Washington, DC 20006-5292