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Introducing the Global English Style Guide<br />Edwin HollonSenior Technical CommunicatorHansem EZUserGuides, Inc.<br />
Overview<br /><ul><li>The Global English Style Guide: Writing Clear, Translatable Documentation for a Global Market
John R. Kohl, Linguistic Engineer
Copyright © 2008 by SAS Institute</li></ul>What is “Global English?”Written English that an author has optimized for a glo...
Why Global English?<br />
Goals of Global English<br /><ul><li>Eliminate misunderstandings in translation
Eliminate terms or grammar that is unfamiliar to non-native speakers
Make sentence structure easier to analyze and comprehend
Eliminate inconsistencies </li></li></ul><li>Benefits of Global English<br /><ul><li>Less liability from incorrect transla...
Reduced need for technical support
More consistent use of terminology
Improved searching for terms
Less work for translators</li></li></ul><li>Prioritized Guidelines<br /><ul><li>Guidelines include a priority for the purp...
For example,
“HT1” means high priority for human translation
“NN2” means medium priority for non-native speakers
“MT3” means low priority for machine translation</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: HT1<br />6.1 	Don’t use a telegraph...
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Introducing the Global English Style Guide

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Presented at the 2010 Korea Technical Communication Association (KTCA) summit. An introduction to the Global English Style Guide as a valuable tool for non-native writers and technical communicators creating content for global audiences.

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Transcript of "Introducing the Global English Style Guide"

  1. 1. Introducing the Global English Style Guide<br />Edwin HollonSenior Technical CommunicatorHansem EZUserGuides, Inc.<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br /><ul><li>The Global English Style Guide: Writing Clear, Translatable Documentation for a Global Market
  3. 3. John R. Kohl, Linguistic Engineer
  4. 4. Copyright © 2008 by SAS Institute</li></ul>What is “Global English?”Written English that an author has optimized for a global audience by following guidelines that go beyond what is found in conventional style guides.<br />
  5. 5. Why Global English?<br />
  6. 6. Goals of Global English<br /><ul><li>Eliminate misunderstandings in translation
  7. 7. Eliminate terms or grammar that is unfamiliar to non-native speakers
  8. 8. Make sentence structure easier to analyze and comprehend
  9. 9. Eliminate inconsistencies </li></li></ul><li>Benefits of Global English<br /><ul><li>Less liability from incorrect translation
  10. 10. Reduced need for technical support
  11. 11. More consistent use of terminology
  12. 12. Improved searching for terms
  13. 13. Less work for translators</li></li></ul><li>Prioritized Guidelines<br /><ul><li>Guidelines include a priority for the purpose of the document:
  14. 14. For example,
  15. 15. “HT1” means high priority for human translation
  16. 16. “NN2” means medium priority for non-native speakers
  17. 17. “MT3” means low priority for machine translation</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: HT1<br />6.1 Don’t use a telegraphic writing style(i.e., don’t omit articles or other syntactic cues)<br /><ul><li>LABEL option not supported for file format
  18. 18. The LABEL option is not supported for this file format.
  19. 19. The following features improve usability of the product for users who have disabilities.
  20. 20. The following features improve the usability of the product for users who have disabilities. </li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: HT1<br />3.7 Consider revising noun phrases(i.e., reduce, hyphenate, or rearrange nouns)<br /><ul><li>The MDDB Report Viewer application is a component of Application Dispatcher software.
  21. 21. The MDDB Report Viewer is a component of the Application Dispatcher.
  22. 22. You might want to use a third party application such as WinZip to archive the project.
  23. 23. You might want to use a third-party application such as WinZip to archive the project.</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: NN1<br />2.1 Be logical, literal, and precise in your use of language (i.e., pay close attention literal meanings)<br /><ul><li>This report compares the salaries of different departments for employees who have the same education level.
  24. 24. This report compares the salaries of employees who have the same education level, grouped by department.
  25. 25. When you hover over a menu item, a white underline appears.
  26. 26. When you position your mouse pointer over a menu item, a white underline appears.</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: NN1<br />3.1 Limit the length of sentences (20-25 words maximum)<br /><ul><li>If Chocolate Bits is set to NO, indicating that there are no chocolate bits in the sample batch of ice cream, then the selections for Enough Bits and Size of Bits are grayed to prevent users from entering irrelevant data. (40 words)
  27. 27. If Chocolate Bits is set to NO, then there are no chocolate bits in the sample batch of ice cream. Therefore, the selections for Enough Bits and Size of Bits are grayed to prevent users from entering irrelevant data. (20+19 words)
  28. 28. With design-time controls, you control the look and feel of your Web pages in a WYSIWYG editor environment, and at the same time use all the functionality of SAS/IntrNet software in your Web pages. (35 words)
  29. 29. With design-time controls, you control the look and feel of your Web pages in a WYSIWYG editor environment. In addition, you can use all the functionality of SAS/IntrNet software in your Web pages. (19+15 words)</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: MT1<br />2.4 Use standard verb complements<br /><ul><li>We recommendto use the Web version of the application.
  30. 30. We recommendthat you use the Web version of the application.
  31. 31. By default, a command bar is displayed at the top of the window. Alternatively, you can selectto display a floating command dialog box instead.
  32. 32. By default, a command bar is displayed at the top of the window. Alternatively, you can chooseto display a floating command dialog box instead.</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: MT1<br />4.1 Place only and not immediately before whatever they are modifying<br /><ul><li>Artificial Neural Network forecasting only works in Version 7.0.
  33. 33. Artificial Neural Network forecasting works only in Version 7.0.
  34. 34. The fact is that everyone is not getting rich. On the contrary, the world is full of disappointed investors.
  35. 35. The fact is that not everyone is getting rich. On the contrary, the world is full of disappointed investors.</li></li></ul><li>Punctuation Guidelines<br />Chapter 8 includes guidelines for punctuation and capitalization:<br /><ul><li>Similar to Chicago Manual of Style
  36. 36. However, these take into account the needs of non-native speakers and translators
  37. 37. Intended to supplement (or, in a few cases, override) the standard rules of American English
  38. 38. Include considerations for translation memory</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: Punctuation<br />8.1 Ampersands (don’t use an ampersand in place of the word and)<br /><ul><li>For more information, see Ch 14 & Ch 15.
  39. 39. For more information, see chapters 14 and 15.</li></ul>8.6 Equal signs (don’t use an equal sign in place of text)<br /><ul><li>Any non-blank character = turn off metadata checking, and blank = perform metadata checking.
  40. 40. Any non-blank character turns off metadata checking, and a blank character turns on metadata checking.</li></li></ul><li>Terminology Guidelines<br />Chapter 9 includes goals and guidelines for controlling terminology:<br /><ul><li>Make documents more understandable for non-native speakers
  41. 41. Make translation more efficient and reduce translation costs
  42. 42. Make information more accessible and understandable for all readers
  43. 43. Improve document quality</li></li></ul><li>Example Guidelines: Terms<br />9.3 Eliminate internal terms<br /><ul><li>In the figure, callouts are used to indicate the main parts of the portal.
  44. 44. In the figure, the main parts of the portal are numbered, and explanations are provided below.</li></ul>9.6 Eliminate incorrect technical terms<br />
  45. 45. Useful Appendixes<br />
  46. 46. Questions or Comments?<br />Thank you for attending<br />
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