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Mgt501 mod4case
Mgt501 mod4case
Mgt501 mod4case
Mgt501 mod4case
Mgt501 mod4case
Mgt501 mod4case
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Mgt501 mod4case

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Edgardo Donovan (a.k.a. Eddie Donovan) is a CIO for the Department of Defense. Previously, Edgardo was the Director of Web Marketing/Design in Dublin, Ireland for the financial services division of …

Edgardo Donovan (a.k.a. Eddie Donovan) is a CIO for the Department of Defense. Previously, Edgardo was the Director of Web Marketing/Design in Dublin, Ireland for the financial services division of First-e Group PLC one of Europe's largest e-Banks valued at 1.6 billion euros at the time.

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  • 1. . . . . . . . . . . The Micromanager . . . . . . . . . . Edgardo Donovan Touro University International MGT 501 – Organizational Behavior Dr. Ken Myers Module 4 – Case Analysis Monday, March 6, 2006
  • 2. . . . . . . . . . . The Micromanager “In truth, Shelley hadn't been his recruit but had come into the company by way of the board's chairman. Pete loved to describe a rock-climbing event that Shelley had invented for a trade show. The booth included a replica of the Matterhorn, a climbing wall, and a 30-foot bungee-cord drop that had been the talk of the show and produced a flood of new leads. "Just you wait," Pete had told him when George announced that Shelley had taken the job. "She's a thoroughbred. Train her in the business. Then give her her head, and you'll see what a difference she can make..” (Fryer) 2
  • 3. As the title of this paper suggests George Latour, CEO of Retornics a successful software engineering firm, has had a problematic relationship with Shelley Stern in part due to his excessive micromanagement which would be more appropriate for an entry level employee rather than a seasoned marketing director. Situational leadership should be stressed as a solution to Latour’s dilemma. It is expected that a CEO, regardless of his main area of expertise, have enough cross-functional awareness of all departments of his company to be able to apply different management styles according to each individual situation. The abrasive direct micromanagement style required to provide structure to software development projects needs to be softened especially when managing creative departments such as Stern’s. Regardless, of Stern’s seemingly thin skin, Latour needs to figure out how to best leverage the investment Retronics has made in her creative talents and adapt his management style accordingly. Stern comes across particularly strong in the creative elements of product marketing for which she was hired for and seems much weaker in the realm of operational management and policy strategy negotiation. Creativity in marketing, design, and public relations is a skill which is very hard to develop let alone teach. Many creative ideas arise unexpectedly and seldom can be produced on demand. That is one of the reasons that managers should always employ a bit of extra diplomacy when managing creative types. It is very important for the creative individual to have a sense of ownership in the company, not feel overly constrained by the business details, and have opportunities to realize themselves through their work. Sometimes a certain creative styles works very well in one company but will not seem appropriate in another. When those situations arise it is very important that management progressively steer the creative design process not by abrasive critiques but by reemphasizing the vision of where they want to take things while encouraging the creative professional to come up with new ways of communicating that vision. 3
  • 4. . . . . . . . . . . " George was in her face, Shelley complained. He didn't trust her judgment. He haunted the hallways and got into conversations with her staff--sometimes getting them off track by signaling what he thought was important. He insisted on issuing a minimum of two press releases each month, even when there wasn't any real news to report. He made her tag along on sales calls to "listen in," despite the fact she had mountains of other work to do. Shelley was spread too thin. When she'd asked for help--if not additional staff, at least an outside contractor--he'd said to list everything she was working on, and he'd help her prioritize." (Fryer) It is difficult to understand the rationale of some of Latour’s actions stated above. Issuing uncoordinated directives to subordinates two levels down, abusing press releases, and excessively sidetracking a marketing director for sales calls do not seem like positive signs indicating a seasoned CEO leadership. Perhaps these are isolated incidents or perhaps Latour’s success in the 90s was due primarily to his technical insight and software project management skills which overshadowed his apparent weaknesses in managing the more creative sides of the software development business. 4
  • 5. It seems that Latour would have had an easier time with Stern if he had followed a slower progressive group norming approach (Crowley). By focusing on the details too soon rather than taking the time to get to know Stern, adapt his approach , and then try communicating the big picture he risks having her go exactly in the opposite intended direction. In an ideal world all team members would be in synch regarding all the details but since that is not always possible especially when managing a creative executive it is best to start going in the same approximate direction and fine tune progressively. As the title of this paper suggests George Latour, CEO of Retornics a successful software engineering firm, has had a problematic relationship with Shelley Stern in part due to his excessive micromanagement which would be more appropriate for an entry level employee rather than a seasoned marketing director. Situational leadership should be stressed as a solution to Latour’s dilemma. It is expected that a CEO, regardless of his main area of expertise, have enough cross-functional awareness of all departments of his company to be able to apply different management styles according to each individual situation. The abrasive direct micromanagement style required to provide structure to software development projects needs to be softened especially when managing creative departments such as Stern’s. Regardless, of Stern’s seemingly thin skin, Latour needs to figure out how to best leverage the investment Retronics has made in her creative talents and adapt his management style accordingly. 5
  • 6. . . . . . . . . . . BIBLIOGRAPHY I. Works Cited Fryer, Bronwin. The Micromanager. Harvard Business Review, 2004. II. Works Consulted Crowley, J. The Lifecycles of the Group. Small Groups Newsletter, 1978 6

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