Police and veterans cit
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Police and veterans cit

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This is one version of the slides I show to police departments for training on dealing with veterans. It looks simple, relies mostly on pictures, but it is PACKED with lots of information.

This is one version of the slides I show to police departments for training on dealing with veterans. It looks simple, relies mostly on pictures, but it is PACKED with lots of information.

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  • Wait! <br /> These themes and images may be difficult for some. <br /> While I do have some research and experience to support my views, they are only one viewpoint... mine... and are not endorsed by the DOD or any other organization. <br />
  • Shay, Jonathan (1994) Achilles in Vietnam. Scribner Publishing. <br />
  • Train Like You Fight <br />
  • An example of deep seated iceberg beliefs held by many men. Never back down, hit harder. Might makes right. <br />
  • Never got a Good Conduct Ribbon in the Marines. As a ‘threat’, police are not scary... faced down guns before. Only issue is going to jail and that doesn’t matter all that much sometimes with 5 arrests already. <br />
  • 3 Responses. Can’t do away with them so we reinforce the one we want. <br />
  • 3 Responses. Can’t do away with them so we reinforce the one we want. <br />
  • Training a police dog takes time. You start with slow conditioning with detecting subtle threats and body posture along with command/control. We can pick up on many hidden signals from people’s body language if they are a threat or not. <br />
  • Railroad tracks, surprisingly like an ambush zone. <br />
  • Martin Seligman conducted a series of tests in the 60’s and 70’s. A dog was put into a room where the floor was given an electric charge. The dogs yammered and jumped. By chance they would jump over the low wall to the other side that where the floor was not electrified. Over time the dogs learned that whenever there was a shock they could jump over the wall to the other side. <br /> The same test was tried with different dogs but this time they were tied down. They too yammered but eventually they laid down and took the shocks. What was interesting is that the dogs, when no longer tied down, never attempted to escape the shock. They learned there was no escape from the shock under any circumstances. This phenomenon was called Learned Helplessness. <br />
  • Thinking trap. He jumps to conclusions. Without looking for evidence he automatically assumes the worst. <br />
  • Working with returning veterans there seems to be some commonalities. Screaming kids are extremely irritating, traffic is unbearable and triggers out of proportion reactions. Perhaps there is no job to return to and the person may feel worthless, unable to provide for a family or self. There seems to be a connection with rank with the lower ranks more likely to have problems. Perhaps this is life experience, perhaps it is social support, perhaps it is a variety of things. Looking around there seems to be nobody who understands what it is like to come home and one feels very isolated. Communication with a loved-one is difficult. Add this to a loss of intimacy and relationships are strained, particularly when other emotions are triggered by traffic, people, explosions and intrusive memories. A veteran may become more combative and look for fights in bars, or perhaps sees injustice everywhere in the world and is quick to attack that injustice, no matter how small or trivial. Finding it difficult to deal with intrusive thoughts, or constant hyper arousal, and other stress, the veteran may begin self medication with alcohol and/or drugs. <br />
  • The typical batterer in a relationship is male. There was a time when it was considered the male’s role/right to beat his wife and kids. The picture on the left is from an English drawing. The “rule of thumb” was English law stating that a man could use a rod no bigger than his thumb to beat his wife with. The typical batterer has a pattern of control and abuse against his partner as well as attitudes and beliefs about his right to do so. <br /> While such attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors do exist among some men in the military, a great number of cases involving male veterans with intimate partner violence stems not from their belief about women, but instead on the physiological changes undergone through combat PTSD. These sudden rises in adrenaline, anger, hostility, and loss of empathy and emotion, combined with a quick reaction to react in dangerous ways, have many male veterans reacting to situations in an abusive manner. Add to this the typical male response/pattern of repressing any emotions or signs of weakness and this creates an even larger powder keg of emotion. Add to this the tendency for some combat ptsd veterans to self medicate with alcohol, which inhibits the prefrontal cortex ability to regulate emotional outbursts, and the likelihood of dangerous angry outbursts by the combat ptsd veteran increases. <br />
  • Military members were four times as likely to choke their victims into unconsciousness or leave them with bruised windpipes and neck muscles. <br /> Compared to couples seeking therapy in university clinics, veterans with PTSD/Depression were 6 times more likely to perpetuate violence, 14 times more likely to perpetuate severe violence. <br /> Hansen. A Considerable Service: An Advocate’s Introduction to Domestic Violence and the Military. Domestic Violence Report (2001) vol. 6 (4) pp. 1-6 <br /> Sherman et al. Domestic Violence in Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Who Seek Couples Therapy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy (2006) vol. 32 (4) pp. 479-490 <br />
  • Rates among U.S. that report IPV 12% In Military 36% <br /> Rates among military veterans and active duty are up to three times higher without screening for psychopathology. <br /> Marshall et al. Intimate partner violence among military veterans and active duty servicemen. Clinical Psychological Review (2005) vol. 25 pp. 862-876 <br /> the number of 972 is based off of the general rates of IPV without regard for psychopathology and estimated for 2700 national guard soldiers. <br /> Part of the scripts and schemas that we have is that we handle matters. Add how we are expected to act/react with our very real hyperarousal and violence is quite likely. <br />
  • Reported number of Physical Aggressive acts over the past year among help seeking vietnam veterans. <br /> 75% and 17% <br /> The numbers in white are the average number of aggressive acts in the year. <br /> Beckam, Feldman, Kirby, Hertzberg, and Moor (1997) as cited in Taft et al. Intimate partner and general aggression perpetration among combat veterans presenting to a posttraumatic stress disorder clinic. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry (2009) vol. 79 (4) pp. 461-468 <br />
  • A well trained guard dog is a wonderful example of the virtue of good temper. The dog growls at what needs to be growled at, licks and plays with kids, bites the person that attempts to harm the family. It does just enough of what is necessary, but no more and no less. <br />

Police and veterans cit Police and veterans cit Presentation Transcript

  • Deschutes CIT Training SSG Eddie Black
  • Police are Awesome
  • • Take Home Message Aggression is met with aggression • Emotions override rational thinking • Our behavior aligns with our deepest beliefs • We are on the side of right and will not give up • We are on the side of wrong and there is no turning back • To feel ‘safe’ we try to achieve control of our situation
  • Women in Combat
  • 503-737-5968 wwww. Warrior-Resiliency
  • Suicide Call Home Argument Stories Traffic Stop Ontario Angry Vet at College
  • People sometimes imagine that soldiers alone are both victims and perpetrators. - Jonathan Shay
  • THE UNNATURAL ACT OF KILLING ANOTHER Lt Col Dave Grossman
  • The aim of military training is not just to prepare men for battle, but to make them long for it.  ~Louis Simpson
  • Offense
  • If you find yourself in a fair fight... your tactics are lousy.
  • defense
  • Quit Never Never Never
  • Military Culture • Ends justify the means • Better to be judged by 12 than carried by 6 • Better to be carried by 6 than to surrender. • Never back down • Hit hard, hit fast... Double Tap • 360 SECURITY • Weapons are an extension of our will
  • Paul Kivel
  • aggressive passive
  • Three Reactions to Stressful Event Fight Flight Freeze
  • Three Reactions to Stressful Event Move To Move Away Move Nowhere
  • The Amygdala exerts more up than the Cortex exerts down
  • What makes you AC angry ? Aggravating Event Emotional Consequence
  • AC B Aggravating Event Beliefs about Event Emotional Consequence
  • Stupid People Doing Stupid Things
  • bomb anger night crying uniform stress level
  • Body and Emotion Influence Each Other B E Amy Cuddy TED Talk
  • Dissociative Good Soldier Qualities Symptoms Emotional numbing Reduced awareness of surroundings Derealization Depersonalization Reduced ability to recall details of event
  • Good Soldier Qualities Increased Arousal Trouble falling or staying asleep Increased irritability and anger outbursts Difficulty concentrating Hyper-vigilance Exaggerated startle response
  • B A T T L Buddies Accountability Targeted Tactical Awareness Lethally Armed E Emotional Control M Mission Operational Security I N Individual Responsibility Non-defensive Driving (combat) V S V S Withdrawal Controlling V Inappropriate Aggression V Hyper-vigilance V Locked and Loaded S S S V S V S V S V S Detachment Secretiveness Guilt Aggressive Driving
  • AMBIGUOUS BATTLEMIN D PTSD
  • How do you act if you feel powerless ?
  • Behavior is often misinterpreted
  • A typical case 56
  • Rate Your Anger • Ears are hot • Skin is red • Gritting your teeth • Staring down the other person • Balled-up fists • Cursing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 57
  • Two Populations Beliefs about men and women. Patterns of control and abuse. Trained in automatic aggressive response to any perceived threat.
  • At least One Act Reported Among CouplesSeeking-Therapy in Past Year 59
  • Interpersonal Violence and the Military no screening for psychopathology 122,407 60
  • Help-Seeking Vietnam Veterans 22 0.2 61
  • VETERANS MADE UP NEARLY 20 PERCENT OF (OREGON’S) PRISON POPULATION IN 2012, COMPARED TO ABOUT 10 PERCENT (EIGHT) YEARS BEFORE.” Melody Finnemore Basic Training: Military & Veterans Law Section Seeks Better Education, Training & Engagement for Attorneys as Veterans’ Demand for Legal Services Grows
  • VETERANS WERE 8.4 PERCENT OF OREGON’S GENERAL POPULATION. VETERANS’ 18.9 PERCENT SHARE OF THE STATE’S 2012 PRISON POPULATION MEANS THEY WERE OVERREPRESENTED IN THE ODOC BY A FACTOR OF 125 PERCENT.
  • IN 2012, OREGON HAD 328,138 VETERANS, 2,682 OF WHOM WERE LIVING IN PRISON. THIS GAVE OREGON THE HIGHEST KNOWN VETERAN-IMPRISONMENT RATIO IN THE NATION, OF 817-TO-100,000.
  • OREGON CRIMINAL DEFENSE LAWYERS ASSOCIATION’S LIBRARY OF DEFENSE PROVIDES BASIC INFORMATION ABOUT DEFENSE AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES IN VETERANDEFENDANT CASES.
  • VET VET VET
  • FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin “Police Negotiations with War Veterans: Seeing Through the Residual Fog of War” by Douglas Etter, Liane B. McCarthy, and Michael J. Asken, Ph.D. ✦ Were you ever deployed? How long? ✦ How many times were you deployed? ✦ How long were you in the military? Are you still in? ✦ What was your military occupational specialty? ✦ How long have you been back? What ✦ Where were you deployed? is it like to be back? ✦ What was it like for you? ✦ Are you in contact with fellow veterans? ✦ Do you miss it?
  • • Use the tools you already have • identify WITH, not against • ‘you’re right, I don’t understand. Help me understand’ • Use your rank • Don’t ‘box them in’ • Perimeter is secure, you are safe. • “Radio Someone” • 3x3 tool • Identify the veteran’s mission and work with it
  • • • • • • • Take Home Message Aggression is met with aggression Emotions override rational thinking Our behavior aligns with our deepest beliefs We are on the side of right and will not give up We are on the side of wrong and there is no turning back To feel ‘safe’ we try to achieve control of our situation