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Lab 7 Spring 2014
 

Lab 7 Spring 2014

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  • -some important things to understand about lectures-first of all, just being in lecture isn’t better than skipping if you’re not engaged in it and actively processing the information-if you’re in lecture but you’re checking your email and facebook, you’re playing games, or you’re studying for another class, this isn’t going to help you at all. Just sitting in the room does not mean you will process the information….there is no magical absorption, as great as that would be. You need to be actively engaged in the lecture to get something from it.-some students may think coming to lecture does more harm than good –maybe they think it’s a waste of time because a lot of the info is being repeated from the textbook, Takes time away from studying. Not true (explanation on next slide)
  • -REPEAT– some students may think this is a reason not to go to lecture, whereas this is actually an opportunity for you to rehearse the material because you’re being exposed to it at least twice – in the text, then in the lecture; plus, again, your instructor will focus on the key information from your readings, so you now know what to focus on when studying - but this can be a great review for you and the more repetitions you have, the more likely you are to retain that information; SELECTING-a lot of your learning takes place in lectures and this is where you can figure out what you need to focus on in your studying outside of class time, so CONFUSION -some students might think the lecture will just confuse them… but then this is an opportunity to figure out what you know and don’t know and then get some answers to your questions. If you don’t understand something, ask your instructor. By going to lecture, you may realise that you didn’t understand something as well as you thought you did.ELABORATIONS/EXAMPLESand often, your instructor will not just repeat the information in your readings, but they will elaborate on it, sometimes providing more information – for example if there’s research that has been published recently after the text was created, they might talk about that, or they might provide good examples to help you better understand the concepts in the text or to anchor the content in something more concrete and perhaps familiar to you so you can better retain itCUES: -finally, you can get important cues in your lecture that you wouldn’t otherwise get – your instructor’s tone of voice can provide clues about what is important – if they slow down while explaining something, then they likely want you to understand it, or they may emphasize important points; you’ll often get extra tips in your lecture, things that aren’t in your readings or on the slides… maybe some hints about an upcoming assignment or test; and important announcements about those assignments and tests… these are things that will help you to study better and work more efficiently and effectively if you attend lecture and pay attention to them-otherwise, without the information you get in lecture and the repetition of important material, you’ll end up having to study more and study harderOverlap – recognize that these things are in reading, lecture, etc. so salience stands outExtra tips – not on slides or in readingsFormula for studying (3 hours for every 1 hour in lecture) – miss lecture, add that extra hour plus a little more b/c you don’t know what to focus on
  • -those were three potential benefits of note taking, but is note taking always beneficial?-depends… elaborate on that later
  • -not necessarily… if the info is complex and it’s all new to you, notetaking could interfere with your processing of the information because as you’re writing something down, you might miss what’s being said next and then you end up with incomplete notes that might not make sense-some studies have shown that there isn’t always a difference in the memory of students who took notes and those who didn’t take notes. It can really depend on the information being presented, speed of delivery, density of material, activation of prior knowledge-if all new to you, notetaking could interfere with process – no flow of ideas
  • -if your notes aren’t very good, then it’s not going to benefit you when you’re studying from them later on and they don’t make sense or they haven’t effectively represented the material-also, if you already have a good external representation of the lecture, then you don’t necessarily need to take notes and you can just focus on what the instructor is saying and maybe write down a few extra points… this would be the case where you have slides or lecture notes that are prepare for you or if the text is very similar to what the lecture is about and the text has a good organization to it, so you can refer back to that-courses where text is similar to prof… listen to prof, take few points, then use that in review of text
  • -last week, talked about active reading and regulating reading… this week, we can use the same underlying processes and apply these to note taking for learning
  • -build understanding – includes APK… think about what you learned last week or in text (even look at table of contents, create outline for lecture… fill in pieces that were covered later)-standard – explain 5 key concepts discussed in lecture
  • -how does prof do this? Point to what you need to read?-concepts… look at text-how do concepts relate and examples of them
  • -how does prof do this? Point to what you need to read?-concepts… look at text-how do concepts relate and examples of them
  • -how does prof do this? Point to what you need to read?-concepts… look at text-how do concepts relate and examples of them
  • B is better
  • Be ready – if you come in a little late, miss opportunity to APK-students often don’t take advantage of this… b/c often not prepared
  • CLICKER QUESTION- HOW MANY DO YOUR NOTES HAVE? (A: 2 or less B 3-4 C: All 5)Structured – identified key ideasExamples – 2 kinds: from prof, your own examplesPulling out salient ideas and use those to organize notesUse abbreviations – save time… effective if you can remember abbreviations and use them throughoutUseful later – student ready to study, create questions from headings
  • -ask yourself at end if you understood or are you notes sufficient to fill in pieces?-translate – notes help you turn what’s said into a representation that makes sense to you
  • Matrix notes – in reading this week… solid evidence that students who make matrix notes understand more… do search of Kiewra and matrix notes in google to get more infoLink to website with lots of strategies for notesUse notes from text to lecture & highlight notes, annotate as you goCornellPredictive q’s…. Highly supported in literature; if don’t get answered in lecture, good q’s to ask-start to see overlapping of tactics because you use them in different way (strategic)
  • Matrix notes – in reading this week… solid evidence that students who make matrix notes understand more… do search of Kiewra and matrix notes in google to get more infoLink to website with lots of strategies for notesUse notes from text to lecture & highlight notes, annotate as you goCornellPredictive q’s…. Highly supported in literature; if don’t get answered in lecture, good q’s to ask-start to see overlapping of tactics because you use them in different way (strategic)
  • -good cue – compare/contrast market structures
  • -already organized when you go to take notes, know what to write down
  • -divide up page right away, different ways to lay it out-details, references to slides, etc. in right-big ideas/q’s/themes or key themes/ideas in text in left-at bottom, space to write summary, possible test q’s (in our course, 3 divisions: concepts I need to understand, make connections between, applications – things that I should recognize)
  • Matrix notes – in reading this week… solid evidence that students who make matrix notes understand more… do search of Kiewra and matrix notes in google to get more infoLink to website with lots of strategies for notesUse notes from text to lecture & highlight notes, annotate as you goCornellPredictive q’s…. Highly supported in literature; if don’t get answered in lecture, good q’s to ask-start to see overlapping of tactics because you use them in different way (strategic)
  • -clues in text, in other assessments that you’ve had, ask prof about what kind of thinking
  • -divide up page right away, different ways to lay it out-details, references to slides, etc. in right-big ideas/q’s/themes or key themes/ideas in text in left-at bottom, space to write summary, possible test q’s (in our course, 3 divisions: concepts I need to understand, make connections between, applications – things that I should recognize)
  • -checking in against your goals (e.g. adequately pay attention, synthesize into one page notes that you need)-ask yourself after trying a new strategy – assess how well it worked and think about why (well-prepared? Way that ideas fit together doesn’t work with this strategy? SMART operations?)-good strategies hard to learn (e.g. concept map) – at first, payoff may not be great, but can learn how to do it effectively; with practice, very powerful
  • -anchor to something specific in readings after lecture-important to actually do that-effective right after lecture – sit down and create sketch – what did I learn, what did I not understand? Usually 5-7 salient things that you take away from lecture – what are those?-creating questions that you’d like to find answers to, possible test questions…. After 101 lecture today: understand, connect, apply ideas – 3 questions-avoid creating multiple representations-a lot of these things you can do with classmates… collectively predict most q’s you will get in course, better than what you come up with on your own
  • -get enough of key ideas that you can write a summary, capture essence of what you learned in one page… ideally that creates connections-identify main ideas, key ideas that support them, how do they fit together in meaningful way-3 repetitions – read, lecture, summary-faster to do because it’s fresh in mind
  • -if taking linear notes, not well prepared, have to work hard to take out important info
  • Today’s lab starts with the My Planner entryWeekly My Planner entries guide you in engaging in the self-regulated learning cycle byplanning for this week by setting a TASC goal for something you need to do in another course (could be for a formal assignment - goal you need to achieve as part of working on a homework set, exam, test, paper…could be informal task like a goal you need to achieve in a lecture, a reading, etc. Monitoring how well things went with achieving your goal (successes as well as the difficulties you encountered while trying to achieve the goal you set for the week. By doing this you can identify reoccurring problems that you’re having and make better plans to avoid them). Again just a reminder that even though we use the quiz tool in moodle -none of the lab work is a quiz. There are no right or wrong answers. To My Planner entries work for you (and get your lab mark), you need to be thoughtful and reflective in your entries. Just a hint- point form is not thoughtful or reflective. If it takes you less than 10-15 minutes to do a My Planner entry, you should be digging deeper in order to make these reflections really WORK for you. Second, now that you have learned what effective goal setting is, you should be setting TASC goals in your My Planner entries in order to get them to actually work for you (and to get the lab mark). When you are finished click 'submit all and finish’ You can also save your work by clicking “save without submitting” and return to it at any time.
  • Notetaking For LearningThis week in lecture we talked about regulating your notetaking.Open the Notetaking for Learning ActivityComplete Part 1 of this activity now. Over the course of the next week, complete Part 2 and re-submit before your next lab. Note: If you do not complete both Parts 1 & 2 of this activity, you will not receive your lab engagement mark!!
  • Collaborative Challenge - this week in lab, we introduce the preparation for the collaborative challenge. The collaborative challenge will take place in their lecture during class Oct 22 or 23The challenge will consist of a scenario of a student (Charles) who is struggling with his learning. In groups of 4, the students will pull out which elements of SRL that we've covered are in the scenario & explain what the root of Charles' problem is & how he could improve his learning. There are a few things that are important to know if students ask:Groups are assigned. There are no switches. The collaborative challenge product (what you create as a group during the class) is worth 10%. There will be another 5% for thoughtfully completing a reflection on your group work (this will be done during the next lab). You MUST attend the lecture in which you are registered. If you miss the lecture, you miss the assignment – no makeups
  • Collaborative Challenge - this week in lab, we introduce the preparation for the collaborative challenge. The collaborative challenge will take place in their lecture during class Oct 22 or 23The challenge will consist of a scenario of a student (Charles) who is struggling with his learning. In groups of 4, the students will pull out which elements of SRL that we've covered are in the scenario & explain what the root of Charles' problem is & how he could improve his learning. There are a few things that are important to know if students ask:Groups are assigned. There are no switches. The collaborative challenge product (what you create as a group during the class) is worth 10%. There will be another 5% for thoughtfully completing a reflection on your group work (this will be done during the next lab). You MUST attend the lecture in which you are registered. If you miss the lecture, you miss the assignment – no makeups

Lab 7 Spring 2014 Lab 7 Spring 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • Lab 7: Effective Notetaking
  • Dispelling Myths About Lecture • Just being there is good enough – NOT better than skipping • Texting, playing games, checking email & facebook, studying for the midterm in the next class, creating elaborate artwork – No magical absorption – Engagement required • Students think lectures waste time & are redundant – Missing lecture increases your study time needed – Missing lecture increases difficulty – Why? 2
  • Why Attend Lecture • Lectures… Give insight into what is expected in the course Indicate what the key info is (selecting) Provide repeated exposure (text and lecture) Offer opportunity to clear up confusion (questions) – Help you elaborate (examples) – Expose you to cues – – – – • • • • • Tone of voice, volume change Extra tips Important announcements Extended comments Superlatives 3
  • Notetaking Benefit #1: Focusing Attention • Note taking can help you focus attention – But not always – It depends • On you • On your preparation • On the lecture Are You Actively Listening? Aware of the kinds of information to pay attention to & processing the information 4
  • Notetaking Benefit #2: Encoding • Notetaking can help you remember the info – But not always –Depends on • Type of info & density, speed of delivery, activation of prior knowledge Is notetaking interfering? Maybe just listen 5
  • Notetaking Benefit #3: External Storage • Note taking provides you with external storage – But sometimes not useful – Depends on • If you do a good job of it • If there’s already a better external representation of the lecture – – – – Online lecture notes Recording Podcast Similar text Yes? Maybe just listen 6
  • So How Do You Take Effective Notes? Task Understanding Understand what you need to do Goal Setting/ Planning Set high quality TASC goals Monitoring & Evaluating Large Scale Adaptation Was TU accurate? Did I achieve my goal? What strategies worked? What can be improved? Enacting Active listening & effective notetaking strategies 7
  • Regulating Notetaking – Build understanding of the notetaking task – Set TASC goals for notetaking task Phase 2 • During Lecture – Stay active and take effective notes using appropriate strategies – Monitor your notetaking as you do it Phase 3 • After Lecture – – – – Perhaps most important phase of note taking Monitor how well you learned Make connections among sources Evaluate & adapt your note taking Phase 4 Monitoring & Evaluating • Before Lecture Phase 1 8
  • Before Lecture: Task Understanding 1. Know what concepts will be covered • What do I already know about the topic? • What questions do I have? • How? – Check syllabus – Activate prior knowledge about the topic (puzzle) • Review last week’s notes • Do readings (or pre-read / preview text) • Brainstorm or concept map 9
  • Before Lecture: Task Understanding 2. Know the lecture purpose • • • • What does your prof want you to know? How do the lectures fit together? (in the course) How does the lecture relate to the text? How does lecture relate to assignments, tests, etc.? • How? – Review the syllabus (order of lectures?) – Look at the text TOC (overlap?) – Read assignment instructions & ask questions 10
  • Before Lecture: Task Understanding 3. Know what to bring/prepare • How does this prof lecture? • Are there online notes? • How? – Set up a note taking form/space • Text book TOC • Online lecture notes – Tailor for different lecturers/material 11
  • Before Lecture: Goal Setting – What do I want to learn or know by the end of the lecture? – TASC goals • Based on your understanding of the lecture task • Help you choose good strategies for note taking • Give you a standard for evaluating your note taking 12
  • Before Lecture: Goal Setting • Which is the better goal? A. Pay attention and take down good notes today during the economics lecture. I will know I have done a good job if I have filled out the centre column for my Cornell notetaking pages (1-2:30) (WEAKER) B. During lecture on Monday: Compare and record examples of 7 types of financial costs (marginal cost, total cost, fixed cost, total variable cost, average total cost, average fixed cost, average variable cost). If I can explain the role of each of these in price setting decision, I know I understand. (STRONGER) 13
  • During Lecture • General tips for note taking – – – – – Sit up front Be on time Be mentally prepared Listen actively & focus attention Engage • Influence the lecture and ask questions – Pacing – Elaboration – Explanation 14
  • General Qualities of Effective Notes Structured Contains examples Distinguishes main points from details Uses abbreviations Useful later 15
  • During Lecture • Actively process the information (LEARN it)      Select the most important information Monitor your understanding Assemble – structure and make connections Rehearse & Review - more than one exposure Translate info into your own representations/words 16
  • During Lecture: Strategies ① Select/Isolate Key Information • • • • Choose what’s important Don’t try to record everything In your own words/use abbreviations Process what’s important (limited working memory) • How? – Use a framework – Chapter TOC or online lecture notes – Highlight + annotate important points/terms 17
  • During Lecture: Strategies ② Structure the Information • Organize the information • Impose a structure • Integrate across sources  Easier to retrieve History notes World War II American Revolution Study guide notes Stuff for chp 1 18
  • During Lecture: Matrix Notes • Lecturer says: “We will discuss 3 approaches to study intellectual development” 19
  • Approaches to studying intellectual development Categories Psychometric Approach Piagetian Approach Questionsthemes Who are the major theorists? What are the factors that comprise intelligence? How can intelligence be measured? What are the specific processes involved in intelligence performance? What are the criticisms of this approach? Distinguish main points from details Information Processing approach Structured Preparing to record key details from lecture Forces synthesis during or after lecture AT-A-GLANCE view Fill in missing details from text Taken From: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoU257QR_f0 20
  • During Lecture: Cornell Method Key ideas Framing questions Topics Themes Write notes Draw diagrams Reference to instructor slides Reference to terms Things to look up in the text Make use of white space so you can fill things in later Overall summary of information 21
  • During Lecture: Strategies ③ Strategies for Elaborating/Generating – Make connections/extensions – Promote deeper learning – Limited during a lecture – Two examples • Predictive Questioning • Cornell Notetaking (Adapted) 22
  • During Lecture: Predictive Questioning • What is it? – Strategy where you ask yourself questions as you take notes • How to use it – As you take notes, ask yourself questions • Jot questions down in the margins – Questions target 3 levels of thinking • Level 1: Understanding information • Level 2: Connecting information • Level 3: Extending new information 23
  • Levels of Questions Understanding Connecting Extending Questions that require you to select & explain things from the text and lecture in your own words Questions that require you to understand & connect, and distinguish between ideas from the lecture/text Questions that require you to extend or apply what was learned by putting new and old ideas together to create new reasoned perspectives, knowledge, hypotheses, etc. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Complete Observe Describe Match Identify Name List Select Compare Contrast Classify Sort Distinguish Explain why… Explain the significance of Infer or provide an example Sequence Analyze Identify cause or effect of… Evaluate Generalize Speculate Hypothesize Judge Forecast Predict Apply 24
  • During Lecture: Adapted Cornell Method Key ideas Framing questions Topics Themes Write notes Draw diagrams Reference to instructor slides Reference to terms Things to look up in the text Make use of white space so you can fill things in later Summary & prediction of possible test questions 25
  • During Lecture: Monitoring • Check in with yourself – Am I engaged? • • Am I listening actively? / Is my attention wandering? Am I influencing the lecturer? • • • Am I searching for cues? Am I choosing the important info?/ Do I know why I’m writing this down? Am I so busy writing, I have no idea what is being said? • • • • Are my notes organized? – Will this make sense later? Do my notes contain useful examples? Can I ask a question? Can I make the connections? Am I putting things in my own words? • • Is this notetaking format working for this lecture/prof? Have I recorded the class, topic, date, page numbers? – Am I selecting? – Am I making sense of the information? – Am I prepared? 26
  • After Lecture: Review Sit down for coffee and review notes • Summarize & Structure – What were the main take-away points? – Refine structure and organize • Connect/Elaborate/Generate – Is there anything I can fill in to my notes? (Compare with peer) – Possible test questions? – How does it relate to other material in the course? • Evaluate – Are there questions I still need answering? – What worked for me today? / What did not work well? – How do I need to approach notetaking in this class next time? Helps Encoding 27 remember more, work less hard to study later
  • Importance of Review & Summary • If you review and engage generative processing (elaboration) after the lecture, you remember more and have to work less hard to learn/review later • The quality of summaries written after the lecture is strongly associated with recall 28
  • After Lecture: Evaluation  Example Evaluation Questions to Ask Yourself                  I understand what was discussed in the lecture I can explain 5 main ideas from the lecture today I focused on listening and understanding I recognized and noted structuring clues (e.g. 5 issues) The notes I took are organized My notes distinguish main ideas from points and details My notes include examples My notes provide a cue for me, so I could write a summary of the lecture My notes are brief and targeted - used abbreviations where possible I reviewed the lecture that day to fill in notes and information I avoided copying down everything I compared my notes to the textbook afterwards to fill in any gaps I asked questions I left spaces to fill things in I filed my notes in order My notes indicate the course, date, and lecture topic I know which notes are missing (lectures I have missed) and I have filled them in 29
  • Lab 7 Activity Overview • Weekly SRL – My Planner 7 • Solo Reflection for Collaborative Challenge 1 • Experimenting with Effective Notetaking – Notetaking for Learning Activity • Time Tracking Sheet (homework) 30
  • My Planner • The My Planner Tool guides you to engage in the SRL cycle each week by – Thinking ahead (Plan/Set goals for this week) – Thinking back (Monitor how things went at the end of the week) • Make My Planner entries work for you – Thoughtful / Reflective + TASC Goals + 10-15 Mins – Are you running into the same problems each week? 31
  • Take Effective Notes • Regulate your Notetaking – This activity asks you to choose one class – It then guides you through the process of regulating your notetaking – The activity has 2 parts to be completed before and after the class 32
  • Solo Reflection for Collaborative Challenge 1 • Complete the Solo Reflection for Collaborative Challenge 1 33
  • Time Tracking Sheet How well do you manage your time? Download the time tracking sheet and keep track of how you use your time this week! Before next lab, be sure to upload your completed time tracking sheet. We will need it for Lab 8!!! 34