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Coaching Your Employees, March 2014
 

Coaching Your Employees, March 2014

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Slides from my HBR Exchange webinar on "Coaching Your Employees." Topics include Leadership roles, When coaching works (and when it doesn't), Coaching tools, Coaching traps, and Putting it into ...

Slides from my HBR Exchange webinar on "Coaching Your Employees." Topics include Leadership roles, When coaching works (and when it doesn't), Coaching tools, Coaching traps, and Putting it into practice.

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    Coaching Your Employees, March 2014 Coaching Your Employees, March 2014 Presentation Transcript

    • Coaching your Photo by Ashraful Kadir [link] employees Ed Batista March 20, 2014 An HBR Exchange Webinar
    • Photo:SethAnderson Who am I? Executive coach Instructor @ Stanford GSB www.edbatista.com HBR Guide to Coaching Your Employees
    • Photo:SethAnderson Why coaching matters to me Started as a client Changed my view of leadership Impact on my clients & MBA students
    • Agenda The headline Leadership roles When coaching works (& when it doesn’t) Coaching tools Coaching traps Putting it into practice Photo by Theresa Thompson [link]
    • The headline Coaching is an essential leadership role… …that can result in huge benefits …but it’s not an all-purpose tool …& it requires specific skills Photo by Garry Knight [link]
    • Leadership roles Photo by Keoni Cabral [link]
    • Leadership roles Heroic leader Expert Trainer Evangelist Post-heroic Coach Mentor Motivator
    • Leadership roles Expert Provides answers Domain knowledge is basis for authority
    • Leadership roles Expert Trainer Focused on the task at hand Shows what is to be done (& how to do it better)
    • Leadership roles Expert Trainer Evangelist Spreads a message Rallys others to the cause
    • Leadership roles Heroic leader Expert Trainer Evangelist Post-heroic Coach Mentor Motivator
    • Leadership roles Coach Offers questions Helps others discover their own answers
    • Leadership roles Coach Mentor Focused on others’ development Long-term growth > immediate performance
    • Leadership roles Coach Mentor Motivator Message-agnostic Helps others’ identify their goals
    • Leadership roles Increasing emphasis on post-heroic But highly contextual Coaching ≠ all-purpose tool Must fit your needs as a leader
    • When does Photo by Antony Stanley [link] coaching work?
    • When does coaching work? High-potentials (Long-term development)
    • When does coaching work? High-potentials Knowledge workers (They’re the experts, not you)
    • When does coaching work? High-potentials Knowledge workers Commitment > control (Intrinsic motivation is key)
    • When does Photo by Ed Yourdon [link] coaching not work?
    • When does coaching not work? Serious underperformers (Coaching ≠ a performance plan)
    • When does coaching not work? Serious underperformers When you have the answers (Asking leading questions ≠ coaching)
    • When does coaching not work? Serious underperformers When you have the answers Control > commitment (Heroic leadership isn’t obsolete)
    • But ask yourself… Are they really underperformers? It may be an attribution error
    • But ask yourself… Are they really underperformers? Do I really have the answers? It may be comforting to think so
    • But ask yourself… Are they really underperformers? Do I really have the answers? Is control really more important? Perhaps I need to let go
    • But ask yourself… Are they really underperformers? Do I really have the answers? Is control really more important? If the answer is No, coaching may work
    • Coaching tools Photo by zzpza [link]
    • Coaching tools Coaching mindset Listening skills Powerful questions Modes of inquiry Emotion management Effective feedback
    • Carol Dweck Perceptions shape reality How do we perceive our abilities? How do we perceive our mistakes? Mindset Photo by Mike Disharoon [link]
    • Talent & intelligence are inherent traits Mistakes are failures or character flaws Negative emotional response to mistakes Talent & intelligence can be developed Mistakes are learning opportunities Pay close attention to mistakes & learn more Fixed Growth Mindset Adapted from Carol Dweck [link]
    • A coaching mindset Photo by Andrew Yee [link]
    • A coaching mindset Growth mindset applied to employees Emphasis on learning Support + challenge Empathy + accountability Not trying to “fix” Adapted from Hunt & Weintraub [link]
    • Listening skills Photo by Ed Yourdon [link]
    • Listening skills Focused attention > time Make the other feel heard How they feel > what you hear Eliminate distractions Cultivate presence
    • Powerful Photo by Erik Charlton [link] questions
    • Powerful Getting beyond Yes or No What…? & How…? > Why…? Maximize openness & reflection Minimize defensiveness Ask once & stop questions
    • Modes of inquiry Photo by Garry Knight [link]
    • Leadership roles Expert Trainer Evangelist Coach Mentor Motivator
    • Leadership roles Advocacy Inquiry
    • Leadership roles Coaching is inquiry Leadership also requires advocacy Finding the right balance is the key
    • Modes of inquiry Pure inquiry Starts with receptivity (even silence) Key is avoiding presumptive questions Adapted from Edgar Schein [link]
    • Modes of inquiry Pure inquiry Diagnostic inquiry Focus & redirect Feelings, motives, actions Adapted from Edgar Schein [link]
    • Modes of inquiry Pure inquiry Diagnostic inquiry Confrontational inquiry Introduces new ideas & hypotheses Substitutes the coach’s narrative Adapted from Edgar Schein [link]
    • Modes of inquiry Pure inquiry Diagnostic inquiry Confrontational inquiry Process inquiry Focus on the coaching relationship Infrequent but essential Adapted from Edgar Schein [link]
    • Emotion Photo by Ed Yourdon [link] management
    • Emotion management Emotion awareness Sensing Understanding Emotion regulation Verbalizing Expressing
    • Emotion management Reasoning = just the tip of the iceberg Emotions = vaster, faster, more powerful Work in concert, not in opposition (Not always) Photo by NOAA [link]
    • Emotion management Regulation ≠ suppression Emotions convey emphasis Emotional experiences stick Photo by NOAA [link]
    • Emotion management Critical for coaching managers You will have strong feelings And we’re leaky Investment > attachment
    • Effective feedback Photo by Ana Karenina [link]
    • Effective Essential to managerial coaching (But it is a form of advocacy) feedback
    • Effective Social threat Feedback is stressful Minimize threat response feedback
    • Effective Social threat Cultivate the relationship Make the other feel known Respond to bids Regularly express appreciation feedback
    • Effective Social threat Cultivate the relationship Avoid defensive triggers The net (David Bradford) feedback
    • My behavior… Actions Statements Non-Verbals Needs Motives Intentions Feelings Reactions Responses The net Me and my… You and your… Photo by The Mighty Tim Inconnu [link]
    • The net Stay on our side of the net Focus on observed behavior Disclose our response When you do [X], I feel [Y]. Minimize defensive triggers Photo by The Mighty Tim Inconnu [link]
    • Traps for the coaching manager Photo by Casey Fleser [link]
    • Traps for the coaching manager Giving advice prematurely Overpowering resistance Creating dependence Excessive support Insufficient support Adapted from Edgar Schein [link]
    • Putting it into practice Photo by Erich Ferdinand [link]
    • Putting it into practice Coaching moments (Attention > time) But gauge readiness Make coaching normal Not a “performance review” Celebrate small victories
    • Experiential learningAct Reflect Conceptualize Apply What will I do more of, less of, start or stop the next time? What do these results imply? What conclusions can I draw? What happened? What resulted from my actions?
    • Experiential learningAct What? So What? Now What?
    • Experiential learning Wash, rinse, repeat (Over and over again)
    • Resources Photo by See-ming Lee [link]
    • Resources For more on post-heroic leadership… David Bradford & Allen Cohen, Power Up
    • Resources For more on leadership roles… Pierluigi Pugliese, Scrum Master as Team Coach & Ed Batista, Leading in Four Dimensions
    • Resources For more on mindset in general… Carol Dweck, Mindset & Ed Batista, The Meaning of Mindset
    • Resources For more on a coaching mindset… James Hunt & Joseph Weintraub, The Coaching Manager
    • Resources For more on inquiry & coaching traps… Edgar Schein, Helping
    • Resources For more on inquiry… Edgar Schein, Humble Inquiry
    • Resources For more on emotion… Antonio Damasio, Descartes’ Error
    • Resources For more on emotion in organizations… Vanessa Druskat & Steven Wolff, Building the Emotional Intelligence of Groups
    • Resources For more on feedback & all of the above… HBR Guide to Coaching Your Employees
    • Thank you Photo by Alex Guerrero [link] Follow me @edbatista Read more at www.edbatista.com