Author Workshop:
Effectively Communicating Your Research
Universiti Brunei Darussalam
29 April 2014
Jeffrey Robens, PhD
Do...
Publication output in Brunei
S
Your goal is not only to be published,
but also to be widely read/cited
http://www.scimagoj...
Be an effective communicator
S Choose the best journal to reach your target audience
 Logically present your research in...
Journal selection
Section 1
Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
Journal selection Factors to consider when
choosing a journal
Aims & scope Readership
Open access
Which factor is most imp...
Journal selection
Evaluating significance
How new are your findings?Novelty
How broadly relevant are your findings?Relevan...
Journal selection
Insert your proposed abstract
Journal Selector –
www.edanzediting.com/journal_selector
Journal selection
Recommended journals
Filter by:
Impact factor
Publishing frequency
Open access
Journal Selector –
www.ed...
Journal selection
Semantic matching terms
Journals IF, Aims & Scope,
and Frequency
Similar published articles
Have they pu...
Journal selection Tips to identify the most
suitable journal
S
Identify the
interests of the
journal editor
Identify the
i...
Manuscript structure
Section 2
Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Introduction
General introduction
Specific aimsAims
Current state of the f...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Writing the Introduction
Beginning should demonstrate
relevance/interest
L...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure
Your aims should directly
address this problem
This study explored the hyp...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Methods
How it was
done
General methods
Specific techniques
(discuss contr...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Results
1. Initial observation
2. Characterization
3. Application
Logical ...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Results
1. Initial observation
2. Characterization
3. Application
Each sub...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Discussion
Summary of findings
Relevance of
findings
Implications for
the ...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Linking your ideas
General background
Objectives
Methodology
Results and f...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure Linking your ideas
New ways to treat or prevent lung cancer
are therefore ...
Coverage and
Staffing Plan
Manuscript
structure
Writing effective
conclusions
Your conclusion is a summary of your finding...
Titles and abstracts
Section 3
Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Important points
 Summarize key finding
 Contains keywords
 Less than 20 words
Avo...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Abstract
First impression
of your paper
Importance of
your results
Validity of your
c...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Sections of an abstract
Aims
Background
Methods
Results
Conclusion
Why the study was ...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Unstructured abstract
Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules ...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Unstructured abstract
ConclusionThus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mec...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts
Writing your abstract
Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules ...
Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Link ideas in your
abstract
ConclusionThus, coordinated rotational movement is a uniq...
Cover letters
Section 4
Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
Cover letters
Abstract:
First impression for readers
Cover letters are the first impression for
the Journal Editor
Signifi...
Cover letters
Dear Dr Lippman,
Please find enclosed our manuscript entitled “Evaluation of the Glasgow prognostic score in...
Cover letters
“Must-have”
statements
Not submitted
to other journals
Source of
funding
Authors agree on
paper/journal
Orig...
Cover letters Recommending
reviewers
Where to find
them?
From your reading/references,
networking at conferences
How senio...
Cover letters
Choose internationally
• 1 or 2 reviewers from Asia
• 1 or 2 reviewers from Europe
• 1 or 2 reviewers from N...
Be an effective communicator
S
 Choose the best journal to reach your target audience
 Logically present your research i...
Thank you!
Any questions?
Follow us on Twitter
@JournalAdvisor
Like us on Facebook
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University of Brunei Darussalam 20140429 Springer

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Effectively Communicating Your Research
Dr Jeffrey Robens' presentation from UBD along with publishing partner Springer.
More information: http://www.edanzediting.com/brunei

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Transcript of "University of Brunei Darussalam 20140429 Springer"

  1. 1. Author Workshop: Effectively Communicating Your Research Universiti Brunei Darussalam 29 April 2014 Jeffrey Robens, PhD Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
  2. 2. Publication output in Brunei S Your goal is not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited http://www.scimagojr.com/countryrank.php
  3. 3. Be an effective communicator S Choose the best journal to reach your target audience  Logically present your research in your manuscript  Prepare effective titles and abstracts  Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Your goal should not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited in the field
  4. 4. Journal selection Section 1 Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
  5. 5. Journal selection Factors to consider when choosing a journal Aims & scope Readership Open access Which factor is most important to you? Indexing
  6. 6. Journal selection Evaluating significance How new are your findings?Novelty How broadly relevant are your findings?Relevance What are the important real-world applications? Appeal
  7. 7. Journal selection Insert your proposed abstract Journal Selector – www.edanzediting.com/journal_selector
  8. 8. Journal selection Recommended journals Filter by: Impact factor Publishing frequency Open access Journal Selector – www.edanzediting.com/journal_selector
  9. 9. Journal selection Semantic matching terms Journals IF, Aims & Scope, and Frequency Similar published articles Have they published similar articles recently? Have you cited some of these articles? Journal Selector – www.edanzediting.com/journal_selector
  10. 10. Journal selection Tips to identify the most suitable journal S Identify the interests of the journal editor Identify the interests of the readers • Editorials • Review articles • Special issues • Most viewed • Most cited
  11. 11. Manuscript structure Section 2 Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
  12. 12. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Introduction General introduction Specific aimsAims Current state of the field Problem in the field
  13. 13. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Writing the Introduction Beginning should demonstrate relevance/interest Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women. Despite smoking prevention and cessation programs and advances in early detection, the 5-year survival rate for lung cancer is only 16% with current therapies. Although lung cancer incidence rates have recently declined in the United States, more lung cancer is now diagnosed when considered together in former- and never-smokers than in current smokers. Thus, even if all of the national anti-smoking campaign goals are met, lung cancer will remain a major public health problem for decades. New ways to treat or prevent lung cancer are therefore needed. Interest Important problem in the field Busch et al. BMC Cancer. 2012; 13: 211.
  14. 14. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Your aims should directly address this problem This study explored the hypothesis that inhibition of TNKS by pharmacological or genetic means would inhibit lung cancer growth in vitro and in vivo… Writing the Introduction New ways to treat or prevent lung cancer are therefore needed. Busch et al. BMC Cancer. 2012; 13: 211.
  15. 15. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Methods How it was done General methods Specific techniques (discuss controls) Quantification methods Statistical tests Who/what was used Samples or participants Materials How it was analyzed Study design Consult a statistician
  16. 16. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Results 1. Initial observation 2. Characterization 3. Application Logical presentation Example: 1. Synthesis of nanoparticles 2. Characterize their physical and/or chemical properties, SEM, determine biocompatability 3. Demonstrate improved rate of drug delivery
  17. 17. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Results 1. Initial observation 2. Characterization 3. Application Each subsection corresponds to one figure What you found, not what it means Logical presentation Subsections Factual description
  18. 18. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Discussion Summary of findings Relevance of findings Implications for the field Similarities/differences Unexpected results Limitations
  19. 19. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Linking your ideas General background Objectives Methodology Results and figures Summary of findings Implications for the field Relevance of findings Problems in the field Logically link your ideas throughout your manuscript Current state of the field Introduction Methods Results Discussion
  20. 20. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Linking your ideas New ways to treat or prevent lung cancer are therefore needed. This study explored the hypothesis that inhibition of TNKS…would inhibit lung cancer growth… Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of TNKS1 and TNKS2…reduces lung cancer proliferation... Problem Objectives Conclusion Discussion Introduction Busch et al. BMC Cancer. 2012;13:211.
  21. 21. Coverage and Staffing Plan Manuscript structure Writing effective conclusions Your conclusion is a summary of your findings Your conclusion should be the answer to your research problem that is supported by your findings Emphasizes how your study will help advance the field
  22. 22. Titles and abstracts Section 3 Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
  23. 23. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Important points  Summarize key finding  Contains keywords  Less than 20 words Avoid Effective titles Your title should be a concise summary of your most important finding Questions Describing methods Abbreviations “New” or “novel”
  24. 24. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Abstract First impression of your paper Importance of your results Validity of your conclusions Relevance of your aims Judge your writing style Probably only part that will be read
  25. 25. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Sections of an abstract Aims Background Methods Results Conclusion Why the study was done Your hypothesis Techniques Most important findings Conclusion/implications Concise summary of your research
  26. 26. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Unstructured abstract Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules develop is derived from model organisms and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models wherein mammalian epithelial cells undergo morphogenesis to form multicellular spheres with a hollow central lumen. However, the mechanophysical properties associated with epithelial morphogenesis are poorly understood. We performed multidimensional live-cell imaging analysis to track the morphogenetic process starting from a single cell to the development of a multicellular, spherical structure composed of polarized epithelial cells surrounding a hollow lumen. We report that in addition to actively maintaining apicobasal polarity, the structures underwent rotational motions at rates of 15–20 μm/h and the structures rotated 360° every 4 h during the early phase of morphogenesis. Rotational motion was independent of the cell cycle, but was blocked by loss of the epithelial polarity proteins Scribble or Pard3, or by inhibition of dynein-based microtubule motors. Interestingly, none of the structures derived from human cancer underwent rotational motion. We found a direct relationship between rotational motion and assembly of endogenous basement membrane matrix around the 3D structures, and that structures that failed to rotate were defective in weaving exogenous laminin matrix. Dissolution of basement membrane around mature, nonrotating acini restored rotational movement and the ability to assemble exogenous laminin. Thus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mechanophysical process observed during normal 3D morphogenesis that regulates laminin matrix assembly and is lost in cancer-derived epithelial cells. Wang et al. PNAS. 2013; 110: 163‒168.
  27. 27. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Unstructured abstract ConclusionThus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mechanophysical process observed during normal 3D morphogenesis that regulates laminin matrix assembly and is lost in cancer-derived epithelial cells. Results We report that in addition to actively maintaining apicobasal polarity, the structures underwent rotational motions at rates of 15–20 μm/h and the structures rotated 360° every 4 h during the early phase of morphogenesis. Rotational motion was independent of the cell cycle, but was blocked by loss of the epithelial polarity proteins Scribble or Pard3, or by inhibition of dynein-based microtubule motors. Interestingly, none of the structures derived from human cancer underwent rotational motion. We found a direct relationship between rotational motion and assembly of endogenous basement membrane matrix around the 3D structures, and that structures that failed to rotate were defective in weaving exogenous laminin matrix. Dissolution of basement membrane around mature, nonrotating acini restored rotational movement and the ability to assemble exogenous laminin. Methods We performed multidimensional live-cell imaging analysis to track the morphogenetic process starting from a single cell to the development of a multicellular, spherical structure composed of polarized epithelial cells surrounding a hollow lumen. Background Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules develop is derived from model organisms and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models wherein mammalian epithelial cells undergo morphogenesis to form multicellular spheres with a hollow central lumen. However, the mechanophysical properties associated with epithelial morphogenesis are poorly understood. Wang et al. PNAS. 2013; 110: 163‒168.
  28. 28. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Writing your abstract Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules develop is derived from model organisms and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models wherein mammalian epithelial cells undergo morphogenesis to form multicellular spheres with a hollow central lumen. However, the mechanophysical properties associated with epithelial morphogenesis are poorly understood. We performed multidimensional live-cell imaging analysis to track the morphogenetic process starting from a single cell to the development of a multicellular, spherical structure composed of polarized epithelial cells surrounding a hollow lumen. We report that in addition to actively maintaining apicobasal polarity, the structures underwent rotational motions at rates of 15–20 μm/h and the structures rotated 360° every 4 h during the early phase of morphogenesis. Rotational motion was independent of the cell cycle, but was blocked by loss of the epithelial polarity proteins Scribble or Pard3, or by inhibition of dynein-based microtubule motors. Interestingly, none of the structures derived from human cancer underwent rotational motion. We found a direct relationship between rotational motion and assembly of endogenous basement membrane matrix around the 3D structures, and that structures that failed to rotate were defective in weaving exogenous laminin matrix. Dissolution of basement membrane around mature, nonrotating acini restored rotational movement and the ability to assemble exogenous laminin. Thus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mechanophysical process observed during normal 3D morphogenesis that regulates laminin matrix assembly and is lost in cancer-derived epithelial cells.Conclusions Results Methods Background Wang et al. PNAS. 2013; 110: 163‒168.
  29. 29. Customer ServiceTitles and abstracts Link ideas in your abstract ConclusionThus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mechanophysical process observed during normal 3D morphogenesis that regulates laminin matrix assembly and is lost in cancer-derived epithelial cells. Background Our understanding of the mechanisms by which ducts and lobules develop is derived from model organisms and three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models wherein mammalian epithelial cells undergo morphogenesis to form multicellular spheres with a hollow central lumen. However, the mechanophysical properties associated with epithelial morphogenesis are poorly understood. Wang et al. PNAS 2013; 110:163‒168. However, the mechanophysical properties associated with epithelial morphogenesis are poorly undersood. Thus, coordinated rotational movement is a unique mechanophysical process… Problem Answer
  30. 30. Cover letters Section 4 Download at: edanzediting.com/brunei
  31. 31. Cover letters Abstract: First impression for readers Cover letters are the first impression for the Journal Editor Significance Relevance Writing style Interesting to their readers? Is your work important?
  32. 32. Cover letters Dear Dr Lippman, Please find enclosed our manuscript entitled “Evaluation of the Glasgow prognostic score in patients undergoing curative resection for breast cancer liver metastases,” which we would like to submit for publication as an Original Article in the Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is of value for a variety of tumours. Several studies have investigated the prognostic value of the GPS in patients with metastatic breast cancer, but few studies have performed such an investigation for patients undergoing liver resection for liver metastases. Furthermore, there are currently no studies that have examined the prognostic value of the modified GPS (mGPS) in these patients. The present study evaluated the mGPS in terms of its prognostic value for postoperative death in patients undergoing liver resection for breast cancer liver metastases. A total of 318 patients with breast cancer liver metastases who underwent hepatectomy over a 15-year period were included in this study. The mGPS was calculated based on the levels of C-reactive protein and albumin, and the disease-free survival and cancer-specific survival rates were evaluated in relation to the mGPS. Prognostic significance was retrospectively analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Overall, the results showed a significant association between cancer-specific survival and the mGPS and carcinoembryonic antigen level, and a higher mGPS was associated with increased aggressiveness of liver recurrence and poorer survival in these patients. This study is the first to demonstrate that the preoperative mGPS, a simple clinical tool, is a useful prognostic factor for postoperative survival in patients undergoing curative resection for breast cancer liver metastases. This information is immediately clinically applicable for oncologists treating such patients. As a premier journal covering the broad field of cancer, we believe that the Breast Cancer Research and Treatment is the perfect platform from which to share our results with the international medical community. Give the background to the research What was done and what was found Interest to journal’s readers A good cover letter We would also like to suggest the following reviewers for our manuscript… Editor’s name Manuscript title Publication type Recommend reviewers “Must-have” statements
  33. 33. Cover letters “Must-have” statements Not submitted to other journals Source of funding Authors agree on paper/journal Original and unpublished No conflicts of interest Authorship contributions Disclaimers about publication ethics
  34. 34. Cover letters Recommending reviewers Where to find them? From your reading/references, networking at conferences How senior? Aim for mid-level researchers Who to avoid? Collaborators (past 5 years), researchers from same institution Look for reviewers who have published in your target journal
  35. 35. Cover letters Choose internationally • 1 or 2 reviewers from Asia • 1 or 2 reviewers from Europe • 1 or 2 reviewers from North America Journal Editors want to see an international list for 2 reasons: 1. Shows that you are familiar with your field worldwide 2. Shows that your research is relevant worldwide • Increased readership → increased citations → increased impact factor
  36. 36. Be an effective communicator S  Choose the best journal to reach your target audience  Logically present your research in your manuscript  Prepare effective titles and abstracts  Convey the significance of your work to journal editors Your goal should not only to be published, but also to be widely read/cited in the field
  37. 37. Thank you! Any questions? Follow us on Twitter @JournalAdvisor Like us on Facebook facebook.com/EdanzEditing Download and further reading edanzediting.com/brunei Jeffrey Robens: jrobens@edanzgroup.com
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