Fundraising and the Next Generation Nov 2011

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  • We are influenced in these generations by key activities/shared reference points – world wars, 9/11, women’s movementBoomers: Martin Luther king, Jr., Gloria Steinam, The Beatles, tv, vietnam war protestsGen X: Bill Gates, internet, Rodney King, Berlin Wall, Apartheid, Madonna, children of divorced parents, Seinfeld, FriendsGen Y: 9/11, Facebook, ipods, American idolMillenials are going to be second in size to Boomers – could rival the size depending where we call the end of the generation
  • Caption from 2008 statEmily – appreciate hierarchy and inclusion; want to be recognized for their contributions to the sector both in the past and NOW. Want to be asked questions about their work in the sector, want the next generation to learn from themINFLUENCERS: Martin Luther king, Jr., Gloria Steinam, The Beatles, tv, vietnam war protestsThis generation was truly responsible for formalizing and implementing what the previous generation had created– learning by doing, improvisation – hasn’t helped with transferring the knowledge and skills of the sector. Can be resentment from these folks who have worked SO hard for the sector and see the younger generations doing things in a more sustainable way.MOTIVATIONS: Money; Status; Toys; Fear of failure; Guilt; Transformation; Making a Difference; Accomplishments; Being best in class; Having choices; Sharing shows up as teamwork; Respect; Service; ProcessMESSAGING: Work hard and deserve it; Keeping up with the Jones’; Didn’t get it as a kid so I am taking care of myself; Living the good life defined by materialismIMAGERY: Healthy
  • Caption from 2008 statEmily – appreciate hierarchy and inclusion; want to be recognized for their contributions to the sector both in the past and NOW. Want to be asked questions about their work in the sector, want the next generation to learn from themINFLUENCERS: Martin Luther king, Jr., Gloria Steinam, The Beatles, tv, vietnam war protestsThis generation was truly responsible for formalizing and implementing what the previous generation had created– learning by doing, improvisation – hasn’t helped with transferring the knowledge and skills of the sector. Can be resentment from these folks who have worked SO hard for the sector and see the younger generations doing things in a more sustainable way.MOTIVATIONS: Money; Status; Toys; Fear of failure; Guilt; Transformation; Making a Difference; Accomplishments; Being best in class; Having choices; Sharing shows up as teamwork; Respect; Service; ProcessMESSAGING: Work hard and deserve it; Keeping up with the Jones’; Didn’t get it as a kid so I am taking care of myself; Living the good life defined by materialismIMAGERY: Healthy
  • Digital natives/Civic minded- think globally because they have more global community access than any other generation. Use their practical know-how to make an impactIndependent but interactive – collaborative as well as independent.Multi-taskers, want customization MOTIVATIONS: Relationships; Varied experiences; Celebrity; Feedback; Mutual respect; Happiness; Materialism; Cause; Creativity; Community; Environment; Money; Having experiencesMESSAGING: Green and NOT green washing; SexyIMAGERY: Multiracial imagery
  • Digital natives/Civic minded- think globally because they have more global community access than any other generation. Use their practical know-how to make an impactIndependent but interactive – collaborative as well as independent.Multi-taskers, want customization MOTIVATIONS: Relationships; Varied experiences; Celebrity; Feedback; Mutual respect; Happiness; Materialism; Cause; Creativity; Community; Environment; Money; Having experiencesMESSAGING: Green and NOT green washing; SexyIMAGERY: Multiracial imagery
  • Digital natives/Civic minded- think globally because they have more global community access than any other generation. Use their practical know-how to make an impactIndependent but interactive – collaborative as well as independent.Multi-taskers, want customization MOTIVATIONS: Relationships; Varied experiences; Celebrity; Feedback; Mutual respect; Happiness; Materialism; Cause; Creativity; Community; Environment; Money; Having experiencesMESSAGING: Green and NOT green washing; SexyIMAGERY: Multiracial imagery
  • Advice from the older generations that will inform their leadershipAcknowledgement: commitment to the sector, new leadership ideas, structures and vision for the sector.Shared ownership of the sectorFlexibility from older generations about new leadership qualities and management stylesThe real stories behind organizations and the sector – the good, the bad, and the ugly.Challenges: long hours make it difficult to have a life outside of work, going back to school, change jobs, look at different interests, have families; more plugged in than previous generationsReasons for working for an NPO: Enjoy giving back to the community - 82%Personal sense of satisfaction - 81.5%)Positive work environment - 58.3%Professional challenges - 57.2%Co-workers - 56%Working with clients: 42.7%Encouraging and supportive leadership: 40%Professional development opportunities: 37%Other: 3.4%Financial compensation: 2.8%Sherri to look for emerging leader corporate stats
  • Lifelong begins in the thirties.
  • These next few slides are really about raising money from small to midsize donorsThese slides really come from the Convio research on the Next Generation of American Giving
  • Want to pay most attention to this group and Gen X because they have the most money in the near future…Grew up with being sold on 30 second TV clips so they are savvy
  • Want to pay most attention to this group and Gen X because they have the most money in the near future…Grew up with being sold on 30 second TV clips so they are savvy
  • Want to pay most attention to this group and Gen X because they have the most money in the near future…Grew up with being sold on 30 second TV clips so they are savvy
  • Gen Next is an awesome example.
  • Do this with board members as well.
  • Do this with board members as well.
  • Do this with board members as well.
  • Fundraising and the Next Generation Nov 2011

    1. 1. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2011FUNDRAISING AND THE NEXT GENERATION For the audio portion, please dial: 866-627-5180 Conference ID: 61736701013
    2. 2. ETIQUETTE • You have all been muted& LEARNING MORE • To join the conversation, just unmute your lineABOUT ADOBECONNECT by pressing #6. After, you can mute your line by pressing *6. • Please do not put your phone on hold; the background music is very disruptive • We encourage you to participate by entering questions in the Chat “pod” on the bottom right of your screen. • You can chat with one or all participants on the call. To send messages to individuals, hover your pointer over that person’s name in the Attendee pod and a menu will appear. Select “Start Private Chat” and a second tab will appear in the Chat pod.
    3. 3. Emily Davis has been working in the non-profit sector as a staffMEET member, consultant, founder, board member, and volunteer for over 15 years. She currently serves as the Executive Director forOUR the Colorado Chapter of the National Hemophilia FoundationGUEST and as President of EDA Consulting. She trains and consults on a number of different areas including board development, online communications, multi-generational philanthropy, and fundraising. Emily authored the AFP publication, Fundraising and the Next Generation, due out in February 2012. Her passion for effective leadership has garnered numerous awards and nominations including the National Top 25 2011 Finalist for Young Nonprofit Professional of the Year and top 35 Under 35 Community Leaders by San Diego News Network. Emily received her Masters in Nonprofit Management from Regis University.
    4. 4. WHO ARE THEGENERATIONS? Generational Mix Generational Myths Generational Characteristics Impact on Philanthropy
    5. 5. THE GENERATIONAL MIXGENERATION TRADITIONALISTS BOOMERS GEN XERS MILLENIALSBIRTH YEARS 1900 – 1945 1946 – 1964 1965 – 1981 - 1999 1980ALSO KNOWN Veterans Baby Boomers Xers Nexters AS… WWII Generation 77 Million 44 Million Gen Y Silent Generation Nintendo Generation
    6. 6. ASSUMPTIONS ABOUT EACHGENERATIONTraditionalistsBaby BoomersGeneration XGenerationY/Millenials
    7. 7. TRADITIONALISTS (1900-1945)Catalyst for NPOsTop down managementRespect for authoritySeparate home & workConformistValue of work vs.personal meaningHardworking, loyal,thrifty
    8. 8. BABY BOOMERS (1946-1964)Formalized sectorAppreciate hierarchy &inclusionAll about respectSelf-improvementStrong work ethicOptimistic & idealisticDesire flexibilityWorkaholicAppreciate recognition
    9. 9. GENERATION X (1965-1980)Self-reliantQuick fixCollaborative &independentDirect communicatorsFinancially-motivatedLook for resultsAppreciate reward throughexternal recognition
    10. 10. MILLENIALS (1980-2000)Digital nativesIndependent but interactiveQuestions the status quoDesire mutual respectCelebrate diversityExpress to express -- not impressAcknowledgement for being hereCivically-minded
    11. 11. HOW HAS THIS AFFECTEDPHILANTHROPY?Development officeProspectingCultivationStewardshipCommunicationRetentionPrioritiesRespectTrainings
    12. 12. TENURED PROFESSIONALSWANT… Next Gen Training Acknowledgment Engagement Respect for legacy Dialogue
    13. 13. NEXT GEN WANTS… Advice Acknowledgment Shared ownership Opportunity to lead Flexibility Sector history
    14. 14. MULTI GEN DEVELOPMENT OFFICESOLUTIONS • Address generational needs • Recruit from within • Develop a pipeline thru training and recruitment • Shift ideas about diversity, mentorship • Integrate new ideas of nonprofit leadership • Leadership models that distribute responsibilities • Acknowledge new leadership • Be open to leaving traditional leadership models • Evaluate and redesign current structures
    15. 15. DISCUSSIONMOMENT Has this had an impact in your organization? If so how?
    16. 16. MULTI GENPHILANTHROPY Why engage the next gen? Next gen philanthropy style Entry points and engagement
    17. 17. WHY ENGAGE THE NEXT GEN?Transfer of wealthLifelong givingTime, talent, andtreasureNetworksEnthusiasticAmbassadors
    18. 18. FUNDRAISING FROM TRADITIONALISTSDirect mail and peer-topeer fundraising is bestWrite checksSmaller groupLifelong giving began intheir 30sLess opportunity fornew NPOsProtects privacy
    19. 19. FUNDRAISING FROM BOOMERSMix both new &traditional strategiesPlan their givingConsider operational &overhead costsUse mainstream mediaas an entry pointLifelong giving beginsin their 30s
    20. 20. FUNDRAISING FROM GEN X Friends/family/peers are influencers Stories have a greater impact than loyaltyConsistently give largest gift to the same charity annually Donate the most through websites (30%) Hard to recruit to your cause
    21. 21. FUNDRAISING FROM MILLENIALSPhilanthropy is timeand moneyLower cost to recruitbecause they are onlineMulti-communicationsapproachEngaged in fundraisingfor orgsDonate in a variety ofways
    22. 22. GENERATIONAL PHILANTHROPY* *Courtesy of thoughtfulphilanthropy.wordpress.com Understand Frame your Choose Your Elicit Their Say Thank their message Medium Response You philanthropyPre WWII Giving is the right Traditional Traditional org Check in the Thank you letter thing to do organizational methods mail or card messageBaby Giving makes me Tell a story Telemarketing Over the phone Thank you letter feel good focusing on from client orBoomers impact letter illustrating impact of their giftGen X Giving Use a formula: $X Peer to peer Online or thru Accounting of accomplishes my provides Y well asks payroll how funds were goals for Z community deduction used and results were achievedGen Y Giving is one tool Discuss multiple Build a web Online gifts & Interactive I use to make a methods of presence volunteer hours thank you that difference in the involvement outlining causes encourages world and they will other forms of find you involvement
    23. 23. WHERE ARE THEY? Existing donors Volunteers Young professional events Media (i.e. 40 under 40) Colleges & universities
    24. 24. ENTRY POINTS• Events – tiered fees • Giving Circles – tiered• Partner with young fees professionals’ groups • Volunteering• A-thons • Board and committee• Peer to peer networks participation• Family • Planned Giving• Philanthropic • Nonprofit Start Ups resources
    25. 25. FAMILY PHILANTHROPYMajor donors have children& grandchildrenFamily legacyEngage youngergenerations and oldergenerationsListen & learn about whatthe next gen wantsProvide resources &networks
    26. 26. NEXT GEN ENGAGEMENTCreate ambassadorsProvide trainingsOffer networking &resourcesBring on as volunteers,staff, board membersListen and learnSnowflakes
    27. 27. 6 STEPS TO A NEXT GEN CAMPAIGN OR EVENT1. Identify young donors and volunteers as leaders.2. Use existing or create planning team.3. Ask team to design & implement fundraising event or activity.4. Provide support!5. Host a successful campaign/event.6. Evaluate campaign or event.
    28. 28. DISCUSSIONMOMENT How do you work with multiple generations? What are some successes and challenges?
    29. 29. A FEWWORDS ONSOCIALMEDIA
    30. 30. “This is not the first time that nonprofitorganizations and fundraisers have hadto adapt to new technologies. Theradio, television, newspapers,telephones, fax machine, and directmail have all affected how we raisemoney. Some of the new methods thathave evolved are more successful thanothers, and not all of them have beenused with equal success by allnonprofits.” - Ted Hart and MichaelJohnston in Fundraising on the Internet
    31. 31. RELATIONSHIPS DON’T CHANGECultivate, steward, and solicitRecognizeMulti-channel communicationsMeet one-on-oneDevelop ambassadorsUse social media as stewardship,not for solicitationEffective database
    32. 32. 10 TIPS ABOUT SOCIAL MEDIA1. Social media is A tool, 6. It ain’t free not THE tool. 7. Not everyone “Diggs”2. Social media is a plant social media3. Add value 8. Have a plan4. Listen & create 9. Connect with other dialogue fundraising efforts5. Prospecting, 10. Be patient cultivation, & stewardship
    33. 33. TAKING THE FIRST STEPS1. Pair up with someone in your organization2. Why do you want to work with next gen donors?3. What are 3 things you can do today?4. How will you make those happen?5. Share and brainstorm.
    34. 34. 5 THINGS TO DO TODAY1. Make a Plan2. Watch other orgs3. Attend trainings & ask for support4. Invite participation5. Support new ideas
    35. 35. DISCUSSIONMOMENT Is social media something yourorganization uses or would like to use?
    36. 36. RESOURCES• Fundraising and the Next • Alltop Fundraising Generation • Alltop Nonprofit • 21/64 (coming in 2012!) • Resource Generation• The Next Generation of • Emerging Practitioners in American Giving Philanthropy (EPIP) • National Center for Family• Working Across Philanthropy Generations • StayClassy.org• The Networked • Young Nonprofit Nonprofit Professionals Network (YNPN)
    37. 37. THANK YOUTO OURGUEST! Emily Davis, MNM EDA Consulting (303) 652-7536 emily@edaconsulting.org www.edaconsulting.org www.edaconsulting.org/blogs www.Facebook.com/edaconsulting Twitter: @edaconsulting
    38. 38. NEXT STEPS: What would you like to continueCONTINUING THE talking about in Google Groups?CONVERSATION Title: Message: If you need a reminder about Google Groups, refer to your Quick Guide for Google Groups. For additional assistance, email jennifer@peje.org.
    39. 39. NEXT STEPS: Thursday, December 8, 1:00 pm ESTUPCOMING How to Run a Faculty/Staff CampaignCALLS Looking for participants to speak about their experience – email erica@peje.org to be a guest on the call! Thursday, February 2, 1:00 pm EST Book Club discussion: The Influential Fundraiser by Bernard Ross & Clare Segal (buy online on Amazon; link found at www.theinfluentialfundraiser.com)
    40. 40. NEXT STEPS: http://www.jewishdayschoolconference.org/JEWISH DAY When? January 15 - 17, 2012SCHOOL Where? Atlanta, GACONFERENCE Cost? $650 for full conference; $225 for one-day track One Day Development Track on 1/16/12 Topics Include: – “Speed-dating” – want to know what is going on in other schools’ development departments? Learn from your colleagues and build your network – Creating a culture of philanthropy based on best practices at independent schools – Choice of breakout sessions on: • getting your board engaged in fundraising • creating an endowment/legacy campaign • creating a strategic annual campaign plan
    41. 41. Thanks for joining!We look forward to our next CoP call…

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