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Literacy
 

Literacy

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This is a presentation of two approaches to literacy, with some statistical numbers of Colombia

This is a presentation of two approaches to literacy, with some statistical numbers of Colombia

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    Literacy Literacy Presentation Transcript

    • APPROACHES TO LITERACY Enrique Arias Castaño
      • “ Illiteracy embodies a language and a set of practices that underscore the need for developing a radical theory of literacy that takes seriously the task of uncovering how particular forms of social and moral regulation produce a culture of ignorance of stupidity crucial to the silencing of all potencially critical voices”
      • Aronowitz
      • Functional literacy
      • Critical literacy
    • Functional literacy
      • Develops skills (writing – reading)
      • Addresses issues of social purposes in contexts of use
      • Defines the uses of reading and writing to achieve social purposes in contexts of use
      • Teaches participants to achieve their social objectives
      • Accepts means of communication as something given and natural
      • Admits the natural status of dominant institutions and social discourses
      • Helps individuals function within a given society in order to participate and achieve their own goals
    • Critical literacy
      • Questions the natural status of dominant institutions and discourses
      • Deals with finding out how something works
      • Looks below the surface of things and events, asking questions such as:
        • Why does this exist/happen?
        • What is its purpose?
        • Whose interests does it serve?
        • Whose interests does it frustate?
        • How does it operate?
        • Need it operate like this or could it be done differently and better?
      • Gives powerful tools for developing critical thinking
      • Conceives language as a powerful social practice
      • Develops a critical awareness of social purpose and whose interests are being served by it
      • Regards critical reflection as a dimension that must be complemented with action
      • Literacy
      • vs.
      • Illiteracy
    • Literacy/Illiteracy
      • They function as a way of labelling and grading people. It also categorizes people into educational haves and have-nots
      • Being in the have-not group creates what Freire calls “a culture of silence”
      • Illiteracy implies a form of political and intellectual ignorance as well as a possible instance of class, gender, racial, or cultural resistance.
    • Models of literacy/illiteracy
      • From Freire’s point of view: “reading the world always precedes reading the word”
      • Skills development model
      • Therapeutic model
      • Personal empowerment model
      • Social empowerment model
      • Functional model
      • Critical model
    • Literacy from a cross-disciplinary perspective Literacy theory Research practice language education anthropology sociology history psychology Literacy is a socio-political construct as much as a linguistic one
    • A theory of language in context Language as text as social process language language as social practice
    • “ Literacy was a double edged sword” Gramsci
      • Critical literacy
      • Ideological construct :
      • it is rooted in a spirit of critique.
      • It enables people to participate in the undersatanding and transformation of their society
      • It develops forms of counterhegemonic education around the political project of creating a society of intellectuals
      • Social movement :
      • It is tied to the material and political conditions necessary to develop and organize teachers, community workers, and others both within and outside of schools.
      • It takes an active part in the struggle for creating the conditions necessary to make people literate
      Self and social empowerment Perpetuation of relations of repression and domination
    • The freireian model of emancipatory literacy
      • Dialectical relationship between Human beings – world
      • Language - transformative agency
      • Literacy means a self and socially constituted agent.
      • Literacy is part of the process of becoming self-critical about the historically constructed nature of one’s experience.
    • Critical pedagogy
      • Student’s voice must be heard
      • Students need to be introduced to a language of empowerment and radical ethics
      • Teachers should provide students with the opportunity to interrogate different languages or ideological discourses
      • Critical educators are also learners
      • Students and teachers can dialogue and struggle together in order to make their respective positions heard out/inside the classrooms.
    • Percentage of illiteracy in Colombia
    • according to the real performance of literate people in our country, what might have been the conceptions of literacy inherent in the implemented literacy programs in the latest years?
    • Statitics from Unicef: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/colombia_statistics.html Education Youth (15–24 years) literacy rate, 2000–2007*, male 98 Youth (15–24 years) literacy rate, 2000–2007*, female 98 Number per 100 population, 2006, phones 64 Number per 100 population, 2006, Internet users 14 Primary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, male 117 Primary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, female 115 Primary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, male 89 Primary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, female 88 Primary school attendance ratio 2000–2007*, net, male 90 Primary school attendance ratio 2000–2007*, net, female 92 Survival rate to last primary grade (%); 2000–2007*, admin. data 82 Survival rate to last primary grade (%); 2000–2007*, survey data 89 Secondary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, male 78 Secondary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, gross, female 87 Secondary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, net, male 62 Secondary school enrolment ratio 2000–2007*, net, female 69 Secondary school attendance ratio 2000–2007*, net, male 64 Secondary school attendance ratio 2000–2007*, net, female 72