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Unit Analysis Map Overview

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  • 1. ECUUNIT ANALYSIS MAPTCHR 60119-12, MIDG, K-12 program areasDr. Allen Guidry – Associate professor, History Education
  • 2. The Unit Analysis Map Designed to be completed in 5 phases or steps to assurethoughtful and meaningful planning of instruction aligned with allelements of education reform Step 1 – General direction and understanding of studentpopulation (Rose) Step 2 – North Carolina Essential Standards, Previousknowledge and skills, summative assessment (Light Blue) Step 3 – Planning content and determining academic languagedemands (Light Purple) Step 4 – Planning lesson topics, lesson essential questions,related standards, and formative assessment (Light Green) Step 5 – Lesson instructional activities, lesson academiclanguage, and differentiation using Gardner’s MI* The colors in parentheses correspond with the colors on the unit analysis map template. Each color section should be completed step-by-step in turn beforemoving to another section of the unit analysis map.
  • 3. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1 At this phase of unit development it isnecessary for teacher candidates to determinewhat standards and related objectives will bethe focus of the unit Selection of the standards and clarifyingobjectives must take root in general CCSS inreading, writing, or math
  • 4. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1Unit topic: British colonization of the New WorldNC Common Core/Essential Standards:CCSS for ReadingKey ideas and details:Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to important distinctions theauthor makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account.Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or informationpresented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.Craft and structure:Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in aspecific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 11–12 texts and topics.Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text,identifying important issues that remain unresolved.Integration of knowledge and ideas:Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data,video, multimedia) in order to address a question or solve a problem.Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding ofa process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
  • 5. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1 Note that in the previous slide, the unit topicwas derived from the NC Essential Standardsfor US History I Also note that the CCSS were used to drivethe direction of the lesson Finally, note the citation of specific NCEssential Standards (USH.H.2.1) there as wellto show direction of content for the giveninstructional unit
  • 6. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1 At this point it is also important for teacher candidatesto determine the particular needs of students(individually and collectively) These needs might be derived from: IEPs 504 plans Students’ cumulative records Special plans designed by teacher teams advocating forstudents Personal observations and observed student behaviors orneeds for groups or classes of students Personal observations and observed student behaviors orneeds for individual students
  • 7. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1Brainstorm Learner NeedsPossible Barriers Possible Solutions2 students – LD in reading Use of leveled texts or read aloudstrategies. Use of visuals in additionto textual readings1 students – 504 ADHD Structured and segmented activities.“Chunking” content presentations.Division of assignments into mini-assignments.3 students – not reading on gradelevelUse of leveled texts. Small groupreading opportunities. Buddy systemand think-pair-share approaches toreading.
  • 8. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 1 Note here that not only identifiedexceptionalities are addressed, but also thosethat are observed or fall into the category of“unidentified” learner needs This is done in an effort to design instructionthat meets the needs of all students in theclassroom
  • 9. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 2 Setting expectations early is a vital part ofdesigning effective instruction In order to establish theexpectations, however, it is necessary to knowthe previous knowledge and skill sets ofstudents To establish this baseline from which to begininstruction, it is necessary to identify/thinkabout what the students already know
  • 10. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 2NC Essential Standards in this learning segmentNCES for USH IUSH.H.2.1 Analyze key political, economic, and social turning points from colonizationthrough Reconstruction in terms of causes and effectsPrevious knowledge needed:1. Basic understanding of the period ofexploration from world historyPrevious skills:1. Sentence writing2. Paragraph structure3. Difference between primary and secondarysources
  • 11. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 2 Note how the previous skills and knowledgesegment Addresses prior knowledge (even going back toanother course) and prior skills (that will becomemore specific as we know more about thestudents) Addresses both content and process of thediscipline (ability to differentiate between sourcesas well as understanding of exploration)
  • 12. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 2 It is now time to think about what we want the students toknow and do/be able to do at the end of the unit As CCSS focus on reading and writing in a “technical subject”like social studies, it might be necessary to utilize assessmentthat integrates and measures reading and writing skills aswell as content A good unit summative assessment allows the teacher to notonly assess understanding of content (which is crucial), butalso the proficiency of the students in delivering thatknowledge in a relevant and literate way. The exampleshown below, presents how a culminating performance taskmight be used as a summative assessment.
  • 13. Summative assessment: Culminating performance taskCreate a recruitment poster for the Virginia Company, to be posted throughoutthe streets of London in 1606, asking for volunteers to become a part of asettlement to the New World. The recruitment poster must have both imagesand words, taken from a mix of primary and secondary sources, and mustexplain how the proposed colony has learned from and will correct the mistakesof the Roanoke Colonies of the late 1500s.
  • 14. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 2 Note in the example summative assessmentthat both sets of standards, CCSS and NCESin social studies, are used to design theassessment task NCES for USH I were used to guide the contentof the performance assessment CCSS in writing were used to guide the method ofassessment
  • 15. The Unit Analysis Map Following completion of Steps 1 and 2, thecontext for instruction and the expectations for theunit have been established To this point, the following questions have beenasked and answered by the teacher : What, according to the standards, should I teach inthis unit? To whom am I teaching it and what are there needsand abilities? What do I want them to know and be able to do uponcompletion of this unit?
  • 16. The Unit Analysis Map – Steps 3and 4 Now we are ready to tackle another couple ofquestions: What do they need to know (content andacademic language) to be able to do what I wantthem to do? What language might I need to coach them on tohelp them better understand the content andprocesses associated with this learning segment?
  • 17. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3• What do they need to know (content andacademic language) to be able to do what Iwant them to do? This question will guide work in the next phaseof unit development through two documentsfound as appendices in the unit analysis map: Content outline Academic language (vocabulary and languagefunctions)
  • 18. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3 An effective and usable content outline is a crucialguiding document for the secondary content teacher A good content outline: Provides an appropriate breadth of content to assure thatall major topics related to clarifying objectives are covered Provides sufficient depth to assure that each contentpoint, sub point, and detail is exhaustively and sufficientlyaddressed Provides a logical flow of content from one content point tothe next – this flow is important across both major topicsand between subtopics and details to assure that contentis understandable, relevant, and connected Links content overtly and clearly to standards andobjectives
  • 19. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3Appendix A : Content Outline (A sample segment)British Colonization of the New WorldI. Roanoke Colonies – A turning point in English colonization (USH.H.2.1)A. 1585 colony – charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I1. Funded by Sir Walter Raleigh, an English aristocrat and explorer2. Venture intended to provide riches to Great Britain and establish a hub forprivateering3. Expedition led by Richard Greenville and Ralph Lane4. Problems with ships and a lack of food prompted Greenville to leave Lane and 107men and return to Britain5. Sir Francis Drake arrives in 1586 and carries Lane and his men back6. First English attempt at colonization in North AmericaB. 1587 colony – a second attempt for a more permanent colony1. Expedition led by John White, an artist and friend of Raleigh2. 150 colonists, including men and women, arrived in July3. First English born child in the New World is born – Virginia dare4. Problems and issues cause White to return for more supplies and support5. Delays due to coming of the Spanish Armada prevent White from returning until15906. No settlement remains, only obscure clues, and colony becomes known as “TheLost Colony
  • 20. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3 Although only a small subset of what would betaught in a full unit, the content outline in theprevious slide illustrates a couple of points: The content is clearly linked to state standards viaa reference to the NCES in USH I The content is “spelled out” in detail The content flows between major topics andbetween subtopics and details within those majortopics
  • 21. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3 Students must be able to understand content, not only ontheir own terms, but also on the terms of the discipline To facilitate this transition to proper usage of “academiclanguage,” it is necessary to identify, teach, and reinforce theusage of proper academic language This academic language takes three forms: Vocabulary: the words we use in common, everyday contexts(e.g. rural, urban, contemporary, foreign, domestic) Language function: The content and language focus of thelearning task represented by the active verbs (e.g. Bloom’sverbs) within the learning outcomes. Examples might include:Analyze, compare/contrast, construct, describe, evaluate,examine, identify, interpret, justify, locate, etc.
  • 22. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 3Appendix B: Academic language (vocabulary, technical language, and instructional academiclanguage)Vocabulary:ArmadaCash cropCharterColonizationExpeditionPrivateerSubsistence cropLanguage functions:AnalyzeIntegrateEvaluateSynthesize*This sample only addresses vocabulary from the content presented in the abbreviated content outlinepresented earlier
  • 23. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 4 Once the “what” has been determined, it isnow time to begin look at the “how” – time tofocus on instructional methodology This fourth phase of unit planning is wherecontent and process come together, where theNCES and CCSS are married This phase is also where teachers marrycontent and context to provide learning eventsthat engage all learners
  • 24. The Unit Analysis Map – Steps 4 How do I know if they learned it and if they can doit? How can I break this apart into chunks so that Ican teach it sequentially and have that sequencebe thoughtful, meaningful, and purposeful? How do I need to teach it so that all learners canhave an opportunity to learn?
  • 25. The Unit Analysis Map – Step 4 Let’s take a look at how this unit analysis maphelps us design instruction down to the lessonlevel so that we can then focus individually onthe procedures of those lessons The following slides show (a) a sample lessonmapped out and (b) an explanation of eachelement of the lesson portion of the map Please note that each lesson in the unit wouldneed to be included in the map in the sameway this one sample lesson was designed
  • 26. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways might thelessons of Roanokehave been used byEngland to create plansfor future colonization?(c) CCSS – Social studiesReading (11-12) #1 andNCES USH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86 colonyfound athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why he receivedthe grade he received andprovide one reason eachfor the why the grade wasnot higher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition; Privateer;Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he received
  • 27. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways mightthe lessons ofRoanoke have beenused by England tocreate plans for futurecolonization?(c) CCSS – Socialstudies Reading (11-12) #1 and NCESUSH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86colony found athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why hereceived the grade hereceived and provideone reason each for thewhy the grade was nothigher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition;Privateer; Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he receivedFrom our content outline, we mustnow divide the content topics orskill sets into individual lessons.After determining the topic foreach lesson, an essentialquestion (usually a conceptual or“big picture” question that sets thefocus for the entire lesson) shouldbe drafted to guide the direction ofthe lesson. This topic, thecorresponding essential question,and the remainder of the lesson(activities, academic language,assessments) should be directlyand overtly linked to an identifiedstandard or clarifying objectivefrom the CCSS and NCES.
  • 28. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways mightthe lessons ofRoanoke have beenused by England tocreate plans for futurecolonization?(c) CCSS – Socialstudies Reading (11-12) #1 and NCESUSH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86colony found athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why hereceived the grade hereceived and provideone reason each for thewhy the grade was nothigher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition;Privateer; Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he receivedOnce we have organized material to betaught, it is important to think about how toassess whether or not observable,demonstrable, or measurable learning hastaken place. In order to build from one lessonto the next in a way that will assist students inmeeting expectations aligned with theculminating performance task, it is helpful touse a variety of formative assessments foreach lesson. Such formative assessmentsshould not only align with teaching practicerelative to CCSS, but should also allow us toassess understanding of content andprocess.
  • 29. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways mightthe lessons ofRoanoke have beenused by England tocreate plans for futurecolonization?(c) CCSS – Socialstudies Reading (11-12) #1 and NCESUSH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86colony found athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why hereceived the grade hereceived and provideone reason each for thewhy the grade was nothigher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition;Privateer; Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he receivedOnce we know ourcontent and know whatstudents should knowand be able to dothrough our formativeassessments, morethan ever, our methodis of vital concern.CCSS and NCESprovide a framework formore process-focusedinstruction centeredaround literacy anduniversal practices.Instructional activitiesshould, therefore, reflect that focus. Inpresenting instructionalactivities, be sure toinclude both contentand method. Includingresources here is alsohelpful.
  • 30. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways mightthe lessons ofRoanoke have beenused by England tocreate plans for futurecolonization?(c) CCSS – Socialstudies Reading (11-12) #1 and NCESUSH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86colony found athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why hereceived the grade hereceived and provideone reason each for thewhy the grade was nothigher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition;Privateer; Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he receivedHere we connect the vocabulary andlanguage functions that we identified at theoutset of unit development to the individuallesson. This academic language shouldnot only be introduced in the lesson, butshould be supported throughout the lessonthrough contextualization, reinforcement,and opportunities for students usage.
  • 31. Lesson (a) Lesson topic(b) Lesson essentialquestion(c) Specific commoncore/essentialstandardLesson instructional activities Formative assessmentsLesson 1 (a) Roanoke Colonies(b) In what ways mightthe lessons ofRoanoke have beenused by England tocreate plans for futurecolonization?(c) CCSS – Socialstudies Reading (11-12) #1 and NCESUSH.H.2.11. Presentation of timeline of Roanoke Colonies2. Whole class analysis of following primary andsecondary accounts of Roanoke:a. Review of Ralph Lane’s account of 1585-86colony found athttp://www.nationalcenter.org/ColonyofRoanoke.htmlb. Reading passage on John White’s New Worldartwork from Tarheel Junior Historian found athttp://www.ncmuseumofhistory.org/collateral/articles/art.of.john.white.pdfEtc.Students will grade SirWalter Raleigh on hissuccess or failure toestablish a permanentsettlement at Roanoke.They must cite threereasons why hereceived the grade hereceived and provideone reason each for thewhy the grade was nothigher and why it wasnot lower.Lesson one vocabularyArmada; Cash crop; Charter; Colonization; Expedition;Privateer; Subsistence cropLesson one language functionAnalyze; Compare/contrast; evaluatePlanned differentiation using Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences:Visual spatial – timeline of coloniesLinguistic – lecture on Roanoke coloniesInterpersonal – think-pair-share activity during lectureIntrapersonal - formative assessment – reflection on why they believed he should have received the grade he receivedOur charge as classroom teachers is to teach ALLstudents. This means that we often must meetthem where they are by using various strategiesthat address a variety of learners. Furthermore,we must challenge them to think in new anddifferent ways, causing them to use learningstyles that they are not quite as accomplished inusing. By identifying and planning to use multiplemethods of instruction as informed by Gardner’sMI theory, we can accomplish both of these goals.