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What About Riparian Systems   Who Benefits From An Early Seral Forest Condition
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What About Riparian Systems Who Benefits From An Early Seral Forest Condition

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What About Riparian Systems Who Benefits From An Early Seral Forest Condition

What About Riparian Systems Who Benefits From An Early Seral Forest Condition

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  • 1. Dr. Stan Gregory Department of Fisheries & Wildlife Oregon State University
  • 2. Vannote et al. 1980
  • 3. 15 N tracer recovered (%) Forest Streams Agricultural Streams Urban Streams Organic matter 9 – 58 8 – 64 38 – >99 Gaseous N 2 and N 2 O loss <1 1 – 15 <1 – 10 Downstream loss as NO 3 55 – 79 44 – 89 <1 – 53
  • 4. Frady 2005
  • 5. Banks 2005
  • 6. Gregory et al. 1991
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9. OG VanSickle & Gregory 1990 CC VanSickle & Gregory 1990 OG Murphy and Koski 1989 OG McDade et al.1990
  • 10.  
  • 11.  
  • 12. Hypothesis
    • Aquatic
    • Slow
    • Physical
    • Surface
    • Terrestrial
    • Fast
    • Biological
    • Deep
  • 13. Aquatic Placement
  • 14. Terrestrial Placement
  • 15. Alnus rubra Decay Progression Aquatic Terrestrial Year 2 Year 6 Year 14
  • 16. Pseudotsuga menziesii Decay Progression Aquatic Terrestrial Year 2 Year 6 Year 14
  • 17.  
  • 18.  
  • 19.  
  • 20.
    • Resident trout populations (Mack Creek)
      • CV = 26%
    • Anadromous salmon populations (Coast Range)
      • CV = 60%
  • 21.
    • Flynn Creek
      • Before logging CV = 39%
      • After logging CV = 42%
    • Needle Branch
      • Before logging CV = 39%
      • After logging CV = 130%
  • 22.  
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25.  
  • 26.  
  • 27. Flynn Creek
  • 28. Deer Creek
  • 29. Needle Branch
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.
    • Stream Flynn Deer Needle
    • 1959-65 2.24 3.01 2.34
    • 1966-74 1.58 3.73 3.13
    • 1988-96 1.75 2.20 3.24
    • CV (standard deviation/mean)
    • 1959-65 23.7 17.2 33.5
    • 1966-74 55.0 39.7 67.6
    • 1988-96 28.6 39.1 55.7
  • 34.
    • Stream Flynn Deer Needle
    • 1959-65 3.65 2.74 3.34
    • 1966-74 3.42 2.80 1.71
    • 1988-96 2.16 2.10 1.79
    • CV (standard deviation/mean)
    • 1959-65 47.9 40.3 16.6
    • 1966-74 14.5 22.7 45.3
    • 1988-96 35.3 24.8 66.5
  • 35.  
  • 36. Arkle and Pilliod 2010
  • 37. Arkle and Pilliod 2010
  • 38. Arkle and Pilliod 2010
  • 39.
    • Increased aquatic primary production
    • Increased nutrient uptake by algae
    • Increased quality of allochthonous inputs
    • Increased temperature can increase growth and rates of biological processes
  • 40.
    • Increased temperature can decrease growth, increase disease, increase competition, and cause mortality
    • Decreased uptake of nutrients by riparian plants
  • 41.
    • Decreased inputs of large wood
      • Decreased habitat complexity
      • Decreased refuge during floods
      • Decreased channel stability
      • Decreased food and nutrient retention
  • 42.  
  • 43.
    • Proportion of landscape and river network in early seral forests
    • Proportion of riparian areas in early seral stages
    • Network patterns of environmental factors, nutrients, and physical structure
    • Network pattern of aquatic ecosystems

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