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Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales
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Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales

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Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales

Paul D. Anderson - Trends in Early Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales

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  • Now widely recognized that plant community struc. (and how it’s expressed as landscape pattern) results from many interacting factors, envt. and disturbance/processes, that operate from local to regional scales. What you see on any point on the ground = function of time since disturbance, and kind of disturb., and location along biophysical gradients. Historically (pre-European settlement): natural disturbance regimes produced dynamic mosaics of vegetation types. Current landscape: disturbance regime dominated by timber harvest and management activities and fire exclusion, constrained by ownership and management goals. However, underlying environmental gradients still have a strong imprint.
  • Now widely recognized that plant community struc. (and how it’s expressed as landscape pattern) results from many interacting factors, envt. and disturbance/processes, that operate from local to regional scales. What you see on any point on the ground = function of time since disturbance, and kind of disturb., and location along biophysical gradients. Historically (pre-European settlement): natural disturbance regimes produced dynamic mosaics of vegetation types. Current landscape: disturbance regime dominated by timber harvest and management activities and fire exclusion, constrained by ownership and management goals. However, underlying environmental gradients still have a strong imprint.
  • Reserve paradigm won’t work for a forest condition that’s tied to disturbance and short-lived in the successional sequence – new approaches needed
  • Transcript

    • 1. Trends in Early-Seral Forest at the Stand and Landscape Scales Paul D. Anderson & Janet Ohmann PNW Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Corvallis, Oregon
    • 2. Factors influencing forest composition and structure Regional scale Local scale Landscape and regional pattern Population processes: biotic, social/economic Topography, microclimate, substrate Species interactions Climate History Community composition, structure Disturbance ( human: forest management, land use; natural: fire, wind, insects) land ownership
    • 3. Factors influencing forest composition and structure Regional scale Local scale Landscape and regional pattern Population processes: biotic, social/economic Topography, microclimate, substrate Species interactions Climate History Community composition, structure Disturbance ( human: forest management , land use; natural: fire, wind, insects) land ownership
    • 4. Outline
      • Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practices
        • Custodial Management
        • Production Forestry
        • Ecosystem Management
      • Current Emphases in Silviculture Research
        • Intensive Forestry
        • Alternatives to Clearcutting
        • Restoration Management
    • 5. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Custodial Management (Pre-World War II)
        • Harvest of old-growth
        • Natural regeneration
        • Attempts at partial cutting
        • Large-scale fire reforestation
    • 6. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Production Forestry: 1940s – Present
        • Sustained Yield / Multiple Use
        • Artificial regeneration
        • Clearcutting and other even-age silvicultural systems
        • Intensive management
        • Quantitative silviculture
    • 7. Production Forestry: Natural Regeneration or Planting? Seed Source? Seed bed? Advanced Regeneration? Stock? Planting Sites? Labor Force? Acceptable Levels of Uncertainty? Timing Species Composition Density Genetic Potential Competition Photo: Doug Maguire, www.forestryimages.org Photo: Sam Chan, USFS Photo: Dan Mikowski, USFS Photo: Dan Mikowski, USFS
    • 8. Production Forestry: Site Preparation and Vegetation Control Photo: James N. Long, Utah State University, www.forestryimages.org Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Doug Maguire, www.forestryimages.org
    • 9. Production Forestry: Vegetation Control Adapted from Wagner (2000) Tree Growth Variable of Concern Level of Vegetation Control Level of Stand Productivity Diameter (Biomass) Height Survival Overtopping Woody Cover < 20 % Cover Present Maximum Site Potential 20 – 30% of Site Potential Zero Productivity All Woody and Herb Cover Removed Competing Vegetation
    • 10. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Ecosystem Management: 1980s – Present
        • Broadened ecological, social and economic objectives
        • Alternatives to clearcutting
        • Thinning for structural diversity
        • Intensive forestry
        • Restoration management
    • 11. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Ecosystem Management: 1980s – Present
        • Broadened ecological, social and economic objectives
        • Alternatives to clearcutting
        • Thinning for structural diversity
        • Intensive forestry
        • Restoration management
      Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS
    • 12. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Ecosystem Management: 1980s – Present
        • Broadened ecological, social and economic objectives
        • Alternatives to clearcutting
        • Thinning for structural diversity
        • Intensive forestry
        • Restoration management
      Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS
    • 13. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Ecosystem Management: 1980s – Present
        • Broadened ecological, social and economic objectives
        • Alternatives to clearcutting
        • Thinning for structural diversity
        • Intensive forestry
        • Restoration management
      Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS
    • 14. Historical Trends in Silvicultural Practice
      • Ecosystem Management: 1980s – Present
        • Broadened ecological, social and economic objectives
        • Alternatives to clearcutting
        • Thinning for structural diversity
        • Intensive forestry
        • Restoration management
      Photo: Sam Chan, USFS Photo: Dan Mikowski, USFS
    • 15. Historical Trend in Regional Silviculture Activity: Reforestation
    • 16. Historical Trend in Regional Silviculture Activity: Timber Stand Improvement
    • 17. Trends in Forest Harvest: Siuslaw NF
    • 18. Some Current Issues in Silviculture Research
      • Intensive Silviculture
      • Alternatives to Clearcutting
      • Thinning for Structural Diversity
      • Restoration of Disturbed Ecosystems
    • 19. Intensive Silviculture Photo: David Larson, USFS Photo: David Larson, USFS e
    • 20. AGENDA 2020: Forest Products Industry - “Focusing Research, Development & Demonstration”
      • National Strategy
        • Advancing the Forest Biorefinery
        • Sustainable Forest Productivity
        • Breakthrough Manufacturing Technologies
        • Advancing Wood Products Revolution
        • Next Generation Fiber Recovery and Utilization
        • Positively Impacting the Environment
        • Technologically Advanced Workforce
      • Western Regional Projects (2002-2007)
        • Mechanisms of genetic variation in Douglas-fir productivity
        • Discovery of genes controlling adaptive traits in Douglas-fir
        • Ecological effects of understory species on the productive potential of young Douglas-fir plantations
        • Soil productivity management in the dry forests of the northern Rocky Mountains
        • Using biosolids compost and mill residuals for watershed imporvement
        • Lidar remote sensing for precision forest management
        • Nitrogen efficiency in short rotation hybird poplar plantings
        • Tools to predict and manage Armillaria root and butt rot disease
        • Influence of stand density on riparian vegetation
        • Effects of soil and climatic factors on early growth and long-term productivity of Douglas-fir
        • Generalizing the GRINCH/Wood quality relationships in Douglas-fir
    • 21. Alternatives to Clearcutting & Thinning for Structural Diversity: Regional Large-Scale Silviculture Research Photo: USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station Photo: Doug Maguire, www.forestryimages.org Photo: Doug Maguire, www.forestryimages.org
    • 22. Alternatives to Clearcutting & Thinning for Structural Diversity: Regional Large-Scale Silviculture Research Photo courtesy of USDA Forest Service, PNW Research Station Poage and Anderson (in press)
    • 23. Ongoing Large-Scale Silviculture Experiments of western Oregon and Washington 1,000 ft 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 90 80 100 60 70 80 90 50 100 Treatment-Wide Percent Residual Basal Area (%) Matrix as Percent of Total Treatment Area (%) CFS (4a) DEMO (2a) DEMO (3a) DEMO (4a) DEMO (3b) STUDS (2a) STUDS (4a) STUDS (3a) YSTDS (2a) YSTDS (2b) YSTDS (4a) UAMP (4a) CFS (2a) UAMP (2b) OHDS (3a-d) LTEP (5a-d) FES (3a-b) DMS_RT (3a) DMS_IT (3b) DMS_IT (3a) DMS_IT (2a) gap (overstory removed) patch (unthinned) 10 ac Controls (1a) CWS (3a) CWS (4a) CFS (5a) DEMO (4b) CFS (3a) CFS (3b) (unthinned) CWS (4b-c) LTEP (3a-b) UAMP (2a) Poage and Anderson (in press)
    • 24. Regional Large-Scale Silviculture Research: Response Variables
      • Vegetation – overstory & midstory 12
      • Vegetation – understory 12
      • Lichens, mosses and bryophytes 9
      • Large mammals 1
      • Arboreal mammals 2
      • Small mammals 4
      • Bats 2
      • Birds 6
      • Arthropods 4
      • Amphibians/Reptiles 6
      • Fish 1
      • Mollusks 4
      • Forest floor 10
      • Snags 11
      • Down woody material 11
      • Fungi 7
      • Soils 3
      • Climate 2
      • Microclimate 6
      • Hydrology/geomorph. 2
      • Forest Pathology 2
      • Social Perceptions 4
      • Wood Production 7
      • Economics 3
      • Operational Factors 4
      • Roads 2
      Based on Twelve Studies Reviewed; Poage and Anderson (in press)
    • 25. Restoration of Forest Stands
      • Insect and Disease Mitigation
      • Riparian Functions and Habitats
      • Post-fire Reforestation
    • 26. Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Paul Anderson, USFS Photo: Dan Mikowski, USFS
    • 27. Timbered Rock Reforestation Alternatives Passive Intensive Treatment Management Intensity Management Priorities Natural Development Tree & Shrub Diversity Tree Diversity & Productivity Productivity & Diversity Mixed-Conifer 435 TPA Unweeded Mixed-Conifer 435 TPA Manual Weeding Unplanted Unweeded Mixed-Conifer 190 TPA Unweeded Mixed-Conifer 190 TPA Manual Weeding Douglas-fir 435 TPA Manual Weeding
    • 28. Summary: Silvicultural Practices and Early-Seral Forests
      • Historical changes in management objectives have been associated with changes in silvicultural knowledge and practice
      • Expanded array of silviculture objectives associated with changing priorities for ecological, social and economic outcomes
      • On federal lands, harvesting as a whole has decreased substantially - regeneration harvests have declined, and commercial thinning as a proportion of harvest activity has increased
      • Silvicultural opportunities to influence early-seral forest condition occur at primarily at two points in stand development
      • Quality of early-seral forest produced by various silvicultural alternatives is not generally well-known and is a current research emphasis
    • 29. ( Paul - Stop Talking!) Thank You

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