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Wsis Alf C7 Unctad
 

Wsis Alf C7 Unctad

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Wsis Alf C7 Unctad Wsis Alf C7 Unctad Presentation Transcript

  • Joint Facilitation Meeting on WSIS Action Lines C7 on e-Business E -COMMERCE AS A KEY FACILITATOR FOR SME COMPETITIVENESS 22 May 2008, ITU Ms. Cécile Barayre-El Shami Economic Affairs Officer ICT Policy and Analysis Unit Science, Technology and ICT Branch Division on Technology and Logistics Building a legal framework for the information economy
  • ICT policy framework for the information economy
    • Creating a favourable environment for SMEs:
    • ICT infrastructure development
    • Legal and regulatory framework
    • Human capacity
    • E-business and economic environment
    • E-government
    • ICT-related trade and investment policies
    • Technological innovation
  • National ICT strategy
    • 181 developing and transition countries and territories surveyed by UNCTAD
    WSIS target: all countries have a national ICT strategy by 2010 2006 : how many developing countries have adopted an ICT strategy or master plan?
  • UNCTAD survey on national ICT master plans in developing countries Source: UNCTAD (2006) No information available 36 countries are designing an ICT plan (20%) 80 countries have adopted an ICT plan (44%)
  • I CT and law reform
    • WHY?
    • To ensure trust between commercial partners
    • To comply with other countries’ legislation
    • To facilitate the conduct of domestic and
    • international trade
    • To offer legal protection for users and providers of e-commerce services
  • I CT and law reform
    • HOW TO?
    • Involve all relevant Ministries to define priority areas for reform
    • Consider existing e-commerce laws (UNCITRAL ML and convention, other countries’ legislation) and regional/international harmonisation
    • Make an inventory of the legislation that need to be adapted
    • Consult with stakeholders to present and discuss the draft legal framework
  • Challenges
    • the lack of human resources
    • the lack of public awareness about the scope and application of the law and its benefits
    • consumers' lack of trust in the security of e-commerce transactions and privacy protection
    • the difficulty in setting up the technical infrastructure
    • the different legal, social and economic systems of countries in a particular region
  • UNCTAD’s program on I CT and law reform
    • UNCTAD builds capacity with legal issues related to ICTs (training course, workshops)
    • UNCTAD assists countries and regions (Latin America, ASEAN, EAC, UEMOA) in the preparation of hamonized legal frameworks
  • UNCTAD survey on legislation relating to ICT in developing countries
    • Out of the 32 responses, 20 countries have adapted their legislation to e-commerce and 8 were in the process of doing so
    • Priority given to e-transactions, information security law, consumer protection, IPRs, ISP’s liability, privacy, dispute resolution and e-contracting
  • UNCTAD survey on legislation relating to ICT in developing countries INTERNATIONAL AND REGIONAL HARMONISATION
    • 20 countries have considered UNCITRAL Model law on e-commerce; 25 the ML on e-signature and 11 the Convention on e-contracting
    • 8 countries based their legislation on the EU directive on e-commerce and on other instruments adopted by European countries, India, Singapore, and the United Arab Emirates.
  • UNCTAD survey on legislation relating to ICT in developing countries
    • The adoption of a legal framework has helped expand business opportunities and attract FDI.
    • Examples:
    • The Republic of Korea: e-commerce transactions in 2005 rose 14.1% over 2004
    • El Salvador: new trade opportunities for products and services over the Internet
    • Cambodia: conduct of trade in the region facilitated
  • UNCTAD survey on legislation relating to ICT in developing countries
    • Next challenge: Enforcement
    • Need to build capacities of legal professionals (seminars, training programs, diploma)
    • Ex: Chile, Cuba, Ecuador, Sri Lanka, the Philippines
    • Need to accompany legal reform by a broader reform on the information economy to create awareness of e-commerce opportunities and build trust
  • Joint Facilitation Meeting on WSIS Action Lines C7 on e-Business E -COMMERCE AS A KEY FACILITATOR FOR SME COMPETITIVENESS 22 May 2008, ITU [email_address] www.unctad.org/ecommerce measuring-ict.unctad.org Thank you