Movements and divingbehaviour of mako shark in      North AtlanticGonzalo Mucientes, Nuno Queiroz, Nicholas Humphries & Da...
Next amazing minutes…• Aim• Intro• Methods:  – Transmitters  – Tagging• Results:  – Tracks  – Diving behaviour
Aim• The aim of this study is to elucidate for  the first time the movements and  behaviour of shortfin mako sharks from  ...
Intro• Short fin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus)  is a pelagic shark• Lamnidae family• Circumglobal distribution• Highly mi...
Methods: Tagging• 15 makos tagged (2009-2011)• PATs (Mk10): 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 days (time set)
Tagging
•   MAKO 86400                     •   MAKO 86399                     •   MAKO 86401•   Sex: Male                      •  ...
Results             Sex                                                 7                       Days                      ...
Horizontal movements• Two main behaviours (selected tracks)       Feeding area           Migration
Mako 86407                                 •   Sex: Male                                 •   FL: 130 cm                   ...
Mako 86402                                 •   Sex: Female                                 •   FL: 170 cm                 ...
Mako 96030•   Sex: Female•   FL: 130 cm•   Tagging: 04/July/2010•   Time: 120 days•   Pop-up: 01/November/2010•   Distance...
All tracks
Kernel density
Diving behaviour• Depth• Temperature (Thermocline)• Time
•Sex: Male•Tagging: 03/July/2010•Time: 90 days                           Mako 86407•Pop-up: 01/October/2010•FL: 130 cm•Dis...
•    Sex: Male•    FL: 180 cm•    Tagging: 27/June/2010•••     Time: 120 days     Pop-up: 25/October/2010     Distance tra...
•   Sex: Male•   FL: 255 cm•   Tagging: 22/August/2011•••    Time: 120 days    Pop-up: 20/December/2011    Distance travel...
•   Sex: Female•   FL: 220 cm•   Tagging: 21/August/2011•••    Time: 120 days    Pop-up: 19/December/2011    Distance trav...
Diving behaviour - Length•       MAKO 107092•       Sex: Male•       FL:   170 cm•       Tagging: 03/September/2011•      ...
In general…         Temperature          Thermocline        Preys distribution       Diving behavoiur of              sharks
Conclusions• Mako sharks displayed different movement and  residency patterns, including a trans-Atlantic migration  into ...
Thanks    for your   attention!!       Contact:  gonzalo@iim.csic.esnuno.queiroz@gmail.comThis work was supported by FCT(F...
Movements and diving behaviour of mako shark in North Atlantic
Movements and diving behaviour of mako shark in North Atlantic
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Movements and diving behaviour of mako shark in North Atlantic

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Contribution to the World Congress of Herpetology in Vancuver (August'11) by Gonzalo Mucientes, Nuno Queiroz, Nicholas Humphries & David Sims.
"The shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a highly migratory, pelagic species with circum-global distribution in tropical and temperate seas. This shark is commonly found in the Atlantic Ocean and are taken as bycatch in longlining and gillnetting operations for tuna and swordfish (Xiphias gladius), activities that have expanded rapidly during the last 20 years. High demand for fins and its good-quality meat mean makos are now highly prized by fishers. But despite the high prevalence, economic importance, and vulnerability of this species, little is known about its population dynamics and habitat-use. There is some evidence from conventional tagging and fishery studies that complex population structuring and movements may be contributing to recorded declines in the western Atlantic Ocean. Shortfin mako sharks may remain faithful to particular regions, which together with males and females apparently segregating into different regions for at least part of the year may result in differential exploitation of vulnerable components of the population (e.g. mature females, juveniles) exacerbating declines. The aim of this study is to elucidate for the first time the movements and behaviour of shortfin mako sharks from satellitelinked electronic tagging and relate this to remotely sensed environmental fields to identify fine-scale habitat preferences in the Atlantic Ocean. Pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags were deployed, recording vertical and horizontal movements and temperature preferences of mako sharks tagged in oceanic waters. satellite tags were programmed to detach 30, 60, 90, 120 or 180 days after deployment.
A total of 16 makos (8 males, 8 females) were caught and tagged in North Atlantic waters, specifically, in northwest, southwest and east of the Azores islands from 2009 – 2011. Tagged sharks ranged from 120 – 255 cm (fork length). Mako sharks displayed different movement and residency patterns, including a trans-Atlantic migration into western Iberia waters. Satellite tracked sharks also displayed deep diving behaviour into cold water, with maximum recorded depths of 1064 m (5.8 ºC) with temperature preferences ranging from 5.8 and 27ºC."

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Movements and diving behaviour of mako shark in North Atlantic

  1. 1. Movements and divingbehaviour of mako shark in North AtlanticGonzalo Mucientes, Nuno Queiroz, Nicholas Humphries & David Sims
  2. 2. Next amazing minutes…• Aim• Intro• Methods: – Transmitters – Tagging• Results: – Tracks – Diving behaviour
  3. 3. Aim• The aim of this study is to elucidate for the first time the movements and behaviour of shortfin mako sharks from satellite-linked electronic tagging
  4. 4. Intro• Short fin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) is a pelagic shark• Lamnidae family• Circumglobal distribution• Highly migratory• Ovoviviparity with oophagy• Target by longliners (meat and fins)
  5. 5. Methods: Tagging• 15 makos tagged (2009-2011)• PATs (Mk10): 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 days (time set)
  6. 6. Tagging
  7. 7. • MAKO 86400 • MAKO 86399 • MAKO 86401• Sex: Male • Sex: Male • Sex: Male• FL: 125 cm • FL: 140 cm • FL: 220 cm• Tagging: 24/April/2009 • Tagging: 25/June/2010 • Tagging: 30/June/2010• Time: 30 days • Time: 60 days • Time: 90 days• Pop-up: 24/May/2009 • Pop-up: 24/August/2010 • Pop-up: 28/September/2010• Distance traveled: 1408.5 km • Distance traveled: 3118 km • Distance traveled: 5214 km• 46.9 km/day • 51.1 km/day • 57.9 km/day• MAKO 86407 • MAKO 96030 • MAKO 96031• Sex: Male • Sex: Female • Sex: Female• FL: 130 cm • FL: 130 cm • FL: 165 cm• Tagging: 03/July/2010 • Tagging: 04/July/2010 • Tagging: 05/July/2010• Time: 90 days • Time: 120 days • Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 01/October/2010 • Pop-up: 01/November/2010 • Pop-up: 02/November/2010• Distance traveled: 3694.5 km • Distance traveled: 6025.5 km • Distance traveled: 4732 km• 41 km/day • 50.2 km/day • 39.4 km/day• MAKO 86402 • MAKO 107089 • MAKO 107090• Sex: Female • Sex: Female • Sex: Male• FL: 170 cm • FL: 220 cm • FL: 255 cm• Tagging: 24/April/2009 • Tagging: 21/August/2011 • Tagging: 22/August/2011• Time: 60 days • Time: 120 days • Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 23/June/2009 • Pop-up: 19/December/2011 • Pop-up: 20/December/2011• Distance traveled: 5168.5 km • Distance traveled: 5160 km • Distance traveled: 5933 km• 86.1 km/day • 43 km/day • 49.4 km/day• MAKO 86408 • MAKO 107091 (I. paucus) • MAKO 107092• Sex: Male • Sex: Female • Sex: Male• FL: 180 cm • FL: 245 cm • FL: 170 cm• Tagging: 27/June/2010 • Tagging: 30/August/2011 • Tagging: 03/September/2011• Time: 120 days • Time: 120 days • Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 25/October/2010 • Pop-up: 28/December/2011 • Pop-up: 01/January/2012• Distance traveled: 5699 km • Distance traveled: 3105.5 km • Distance traveled: 2414.5 km• 47.5 km/day • 25.9 km/day • 20.1 km/day
  8. 8. Results Sex 7 Days 7 8 6 7 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 2 1 1Male Female 0 30 60 90 120 180 300 Length 245 255 250 240 220 220 200 180 165 170 170 170 170 150 140 125 130 130 100 50 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  9. 9. Horizontal movements• Two main behaviours (selected tracks) Feeding area Migration
  10. 10. Mako 86407 • Sex: Male • FL: 130 cm • Tagging: 03/July/2010 • Time: 90 days • Pop-up: 01/October/2010 • Distance traveled: 3700 km • Ratio 41.1 km/day Mako 86408• Sex: Male• FL: 180 cm• Tagging: 27/June/2010• Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 25/October/2010• Distance traveled: 5699 km• Ratio 47.5 km/day
  11. 11. Mako 86402 • Sex: Female • FL: 170 cm • Tagging: 24/abril/2009 • Time: 60 days • Pop-up: 23/junio/2009 • Distance: 5168.5 km • Ratio: 86.2 km/day Mako 107089• Sex: Female• FL: 220 cm• Tagging: 21/August/2011• Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 19/December/2011• Distance traveled: 5160 km• 43 km/day
  12. 12. Mako 96030• Sex: Female• FL: 130 cm• Tagging: 04/July/2010• Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 01/November/2010• Distance traveled: 6025.5 km• Ratio: 50.2 km/day
  13. 13. All tracks
  14. 14. Kernel density
  15. 15. Diving behaviour• Depth• Temperature (Thermocline)• Time
  16. 16. •Sex: Male•Tagging: 03/July/2010•Time: 90 days Mako 86407•Pop-up: 01/October/2010•FL: 130 cm•Distance: 3700 km•Ratio: 41.11 km/day
  17. 17. • Sex: Male• FL: 180 cm• Tagging: 27/June/2010••• Time: 120 days Pop-up: 25/October/2010 Distance traveled: 5699 km Mako 86408• 47.5 km/day 30 20 MinTemp1 10 MaxTemp1 0 0 200 400 600
  18. 18. • Sex: Male• FL: 255 cm• Tagging: 22/August/2011••• Time: 120 days Pop-up: 20/December/2011 Distance traveled: 5933 km Mako 107090• 49.4 km/day
  19. 19. • Sex: Female• FL: 220 cm• Tagging: 21/August/2011••• Time: 120 days Pop-up: 19/December/2011 Distance traveled: 5160 km Mako 107089• 43 km/day
  20. 20. Diving behaviour - Length• MAKO 107092• Sex: Male• FL: 170 cm• Tagging: 03/September/2011• Time: 120 days• Pop-up: 01/January/2012• Distance traveled: 2414.5 km• 20.1 km/day • MAKO 107090 • Sex: Male • FL: 255 cm • Tagging: 22/August/2011 • Time: 120 days • Pop-up: 20/December/2011 • Distance traveled: 5933 km • 49.4 km/day
  21. 21. In general… Temperature Thermocline Preys distribution Diving behavoiur of sharks
  22. 22. Conclusions• Mako sharks displayed different movement and residency patterns, including a trans-Atlantic migration into western Iberia waters.• Sharks also displayed deep diving behaviour into cold water, with maximum recorded depths of 1744 m (I. paucus) and 1480 (I. oxyrinchus), although most do not exceed 600 m• Temperature preferences ranging from 5.8 and 27ºC.• Different behaviour between adult and juvenile makos.
  23. 23. Thanks for your attention!! Contact: gonzalo@iim.csic.esnuno.queiroz@gmail.comThis work was supported by FCT(Fundação para a Ciência e aTecnologia) and the Save our SeasFoundation
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