Is angling a stochastic process for life‐history   traits? An empirical assessment for marine                  coastal fis...
Overview  1. Fishing is almost never random. Typically, gear is designed to      remove some kinds of individuals, usually...
Overview  3. Similarly, in recreational fisheries, vulnerability to capture can      be size‐related, but also depends on ...
Overview  5. If some part of the phenotypic variation within species is due      to genetic differences between individual...
Overview  7. The potential for evolution of behavioural and physiological      traits and its consequences for life histor...
Objectives   The main objective of this study is to provide an          empirical prove to know if angling is a         se...
The case study: marine coastal sedentary fish       Case study: Painted comber, Serranus scriba (Serranidae)     1. Simult...
Materials and methods  Experimental site (EA):  1. 1 experimental area at Palma Bay (wild population)  2. Area of 1 km2 (~...
Materials and methods  Sampling methods (Experiment):  1. Random‐sample: based in beam trawl fishing (non‐selective      f...
Materials and methods   Biological sampling:   For each fish: Otolith extraction, total length (mm), age (years),      wei...
Materials and methods Estimating life‐history traits (individual     growth and reproduction investment): 1. Estimating li...
Materials and methods        However, the back‐calculation of length‐at‐          age using growth marks in the otoliths, ...
Materials and methods      Estimating life‐history traits (Lester et al. 2004) fitting back‐                  calculated d...
Materials and methods                          4) Problem: species with short life‐span                                   ...
Materials and methods     Direct measures of reproduction investment:      1.Batch fecundity ~ “Quantity”      2.Mean dry ...
Results   1. Sample size (fish size and age):   Fish size (mm) and age (years) frequency distributions was not       diffe...
Results    3. Maximum fish size (Lmax):    The maximum size that the individual raise up to age ∞ (Lmax)       was differe...
Results    4. Reproduction investment (g):    Strong evidence for the hypothesis that the indirect measure of        indiv...
Results    5. Age of maturation (T) and immature growth rate (h):    Posterior distributions reveals no differences betwee...
Results    6. Summary: “averaged” individual trajectory per group    Angling are doing an artificial selection against gro...
Results                           7. Direct measures of reproduction investment (batch fecundity                          ...
Results   8. Relationship between Indirect measures and direct measures       of reproduction investment   There was a sig...
Discussion: general    Is angling a stochastic (random) process for life‐         history traits in marine wild population...
Discussion: methods   1. General results showed good performance of the Bayesian       framework to estimate individual li...
Discussion: growth   Our empirical approach demonstrated how angling exercises an      artificial selection against faster...
Discussion: growth   This fast grower individuals have higher grow ability with larger      maximum sizes   In terms of fi...
Discussion: reproduction investment (indirect measures)   Fish sampled by angling have lower values of reproduction       ...
Discussion: reproduction investment (direct measures)   Direct measures of reproduction investment (Quantity ~ batch      ...
Discussion: age of maturation (T)   It is expected that the age of maturation and fishing mortality are        negatively ...
Discussion: immature growth (h)   Values of growth prior maturation h, (mm year‐1) were highly       variable and posterio...
Conclusions and implications   Given the high heritability of this life‐history traits and the       intensity of size‐sel...
Danke schön              &Thank you for your attention
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Is angling a stochastic process for life-history traits? An empirical assessment for marine coastal fisheries

866 views
790 views

Published on

Larger and older fish individuals within a population tend to experience a larger mortality probability than smaller and younger individuals. This implies that fishing selects against life-history traits correlating with body size, such as growth capacity, reproductive investment and timing of maturation. It is currently unkown whether individuals vulnerable to fishing gear differ systematically from the average individual in terms of growth capacity and reproductive investment. Here, we present results that supports that angling does not constitute a stochastic process for targeting life-history traits in a marine sedentary fish populations. Individuals from a wild population of Serranus scriba were sampled using two different gears to obtain a random sample regarding life-history traits (beam trawl) and a hook-and-line-sample (angling). We fitted individual back-calculated size-at-age data to life-history models to obtain the parameters maximum size (Lmax) and reproduction investment (g). In line with expectations we found that individuals vulnerable to angling exhibited larger maximum sizes and lower values for reproductive investments, collectively indicating faster growing individuals in terms of somatic growth. Thus, our study suggests that systematic removal of vulnerable fish will exert selection pressures for increasing reproductive investment and smaller maximum sizes, which will penalize the average growth rate of individuals in the population.

Published in: Education, Technology, Sports
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
866
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
206
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Is angling a stochastic process for life-history traits? An empirical assessment for marine coastal fisheries

  1. 1. Is angling a stochastic process for life‐history  traits? An empirical assessment for marine  coastal fisheriesJosep Alós1, Robert Arlinghaus2,3, Miquel Palmer1, Lucie Buttay1 and Alexandre Alonso‐Fernández4 1IMEDEA (CSIC‐UIB), Spain 2Leibniz‐Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries , Berlin, Germany3Inland Fisheries Management Laboratory, Humboldt‐University at Berlin, Germany 4IIM (CSIC), Spain
  2. 2. Overview 1. Fishing is almost never random. Typically, gear is designed to  remove some kinds of individuals, usually individuals that are  larger and, indirectly, older (e.g. mesh size of nets) 2. Fishing mortality is therefore size‐selective with respect both  to species and to phenotypic variation within species (Stokes  et al 1993; Jennings et al 1998)
  3. 3. Overview 3. Similarly, in recreational fisheries, vulnerability to capture can  be size‐related, but also depends on a fish’s decision to attack  and (or) ingest baited hooks (e.g. Cooke et al 2007). 4. In this context, individuals with lower cognitive abilities and  those with higher metabolism and growth capacity often take  more risks, rendering these fish more vulnerable to capture  (Reviewed in Uusi‐Heikkilä et al. 2008)
  4. 4. Overview 5. If some part of the phenotypic variation within species is due  to genetic differences between individuals, then fishing might  causes evolutionary change 6. Thus, behaviour‐driven vulnerability to fishing might  constitute an underappreciated mechanism for selection on  growth rate and (or) other life‐history traits (Uusi‐Heikkilä et  al. 2008)
  5. 5. Overview 7. The potential for evolution of behavioural and physiological  traits and its consequences for life history, yet largely  overlooked research area within the emerging context of  Fisheries‐induced evolution of FIE (Uusi‐Heikkilä et al. 2008) 8. Moreover, most of work are focused in freshwater  recreational fisheries and empirical evidences in marine wild  populations is still scarce
  6. 6. Objectives The main objective of this study is to provide an  empirical prove to know if angling is a  selection process rather than a random  process for life‐history  traits in marine coastal  fisheries With the main task: Estimating individual life‐history traits (reproduction investment,  infinite size, immature growth and maturation age/size) from  individuals randomly and angling sampled from a wild  population
  7. 7. The case study: marine coastal sedentary fish Case study: Painted comber, Serranus scriba (Serranidae) 1. Simultaneous hermaphrodite (indeterminate spawners)2. Maximum size (25 cm), short life‐span (maximum age 11 years), fast  growth and early age of maturation (~1st 2nd year) 3. Limited home range ( ~1 km2) 4. Low interest for commercial fisheries, but…One of the most important targeted species for the recreational fishery  from Balearic Islands (Morales‐Nin et al 2005)
  8. 8. Materials and methods Experimental site (EA): 1. 1 experimental area at Palma Bay (wild population) 2. Area of 1 km2 (~ mean of home range of S. scriba)
  9. 9. Materials and methods Sampling methods (Experiment): 1. Random‐sample: based in beam trawl fishing (non‐selective  for life‐history traits a priori) 2. Angling‐sample: based in experiment angling session using  conventional recreational gears (Static fishing with natural  baits) ↔ High vulnerable fish Vs.
  10. 10. Materials and methods Biological sampling: For each fish: Otolith extraction, total length (mm), age (years),  weight (g) and gonad extraction (batch fecundity and dry  weight) 120 y = 8E-06x3.0843 100 R2 = 0.9915 80 Weigth (g) 60 40 20 N=338 0 50 75 100 125 150 175 200 Total length (mm)
  11. 11. Materials and methods Estimating life‐history traits (individual  growth and reproduction investment): 1. Estimating life‐history traits is almost  never easy at individual level (we need  to track the individual over time) 2. Ideally direct measures of the trait should be obtained  throughout their lifespan and only captivity and mark‐and‐ recapture programs (e.g. Smith et al 1997 or Zhang et al 2009)  allow it 3. However, the representativeness of captivity studies, and the  difficulties for mark‐and‐recapture programs (time scale and  effort, e.g. Palmer et al 2011) present different sources of bias (altering biological traits)
  12. 12. Materials and methods However, the back‐calculation of length‐at‐ age using growth marks in the otoliths,  can offer reliable methods to obtain  information on individual level over its  life‐span (Pilling et al 2008_CJFAS) 200 300 y = 57.7x - 20.872 180 250 r 2 = 0.8369 160 Total length (mm) 140 Total length (mm) 200 120 150 100 100 80 60 50 40 0 20 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 0 Otolith radius (mm) 0 2 4 6 8 10 Age (years)
  13. 13. Materials and methods Estimating life‐history traits (Lester et al. 2004) fitting back‐ calculated data (4 main considerations) 1. The life time growth pattern (individual growth trajectory) is biphasic characterized by a lineal growth in immature ages (all the energy is  invested in somatic growth) 2. Adult somatic growth is represented by a Von Bertalanffy (VB) growth  equation (the characteristic asymptotic shape arising primarily from the  allocation of energy to reproduction 5 3. Lester et al. 2004 model offered a  Fish size in otolith scale (mm) biological interpretation of the VB  4 growth parameters (L∞, k and T0).  3 We can estimate the biological traits:   2 maximum immature growth (h),  1 reproduction investment (g), infinite size  (L∞) and size‐age of maturation (T) at  0 individual level 0 5 10 15 Age (years)
  14. 14. Materials and methods 4) Problem: species with short life‐span Solution Number of fish (%) 40 30 20 Fitting the longitudinal data in a  10 Bayesian context to include two  0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 kinds of a priori information: 290 Age (years) The estimation of the parameters  240 depends on the:1) Populations  190 mean, 2) Previous data published  and 3) Individual dataTL (mm) 140 90 Bayesian credibility intervals of the  posteriors distributions was used to  40 assess with the differences among  ‐10 groups (Low and high “angling”  0 3 6 9 12 15 18 Age (years) vulnerable fish)
  15. 15. Materials and methods Direct measures of reproduction investment:  1.Batch fecundity ~ “Quantity”  2.Mean dry weights of eggs ~ “Quality” Frequentist statistics: GLMM  In all cases data were non‐independent  and hierarchically structured in fishing  trips which were considered as  random factor
  16. 16. Results 1. Sample size (fish size and age): Fish size (mm) and age (years) frequency distributions was not  different among group‐samples (GLMM, p = 0.490 and GLMM,  p = 0.695 respectively) 1.0 Reproduction investment (g) 2. PCA  Maturation size Immature growth Fish size • Independence of age and size PCA Axis 2 (70.5%) • Infinite size (L∞) and reproduc on  Age investment (g) negatively correlated • High pre‐maturation somatic growth  Infinite size (h) associated with higher  maturation size -1.0 N=337 -0.6 PCA Axis 1 (46.5%) 1.2
  17. 17. Results 3. Maximum fish size (Lmax): The maximum size that the individual raise up to age ∞ (Lmax)  was different between vulnerability groups 240 220 High growth ability in high  vulnerable individuals  200 Lmax (angling sample) 180 160 140 Low High
  18. 18. Results 4. Reproduction investment (g): Strong evidence for the hypothesis that the indirect measure of  individual reproduction investment (g) differs between groups Reproduction investement (g) 0.9 Low reproduction  investment in high  0.8 vulnerable individuals  (angling sample) 0.7 0.6 Low High
  19. 19. Results 5. Age of maturation (T) and immature growth rate (h): Posterior distributions reveals no differences between  vulnerability groups for the age of maturation (T)  and the  immature growth (h) 50 1.7 45 1.6 1.5 40 T h 1.4 35 1.3 30 1.2 25 1.1 Low High Low High
  20. 20. Results 6. Summary: “averaged” individual trajectory per group Angling are doing an artificial selection against grow faster  individuals with high grow capacity and less investment to  reproduction 4 Fishing selection Fish size in otolith scale (mm) 3 2 1 Low High 0 0 5 10 15 20 Age (years)
  21. 21. Results 7. Direct measures of reproduction investment (batch fecundity  and dry weight of eggs): Beam trawl Angling 0.020 10 9 log ( batch fecundity ) 0.015 Egg Weight (mg) 8 7 6 0.010 5 Low 4 P < 0.01 Conf.Int. 95% P < 0.05 0.005 High Conf.Int. 95% 3 50 100 150 200 250 Low High Fish Length(mm)
  22. 22. Results 8. Relationship between Indirect measures and direct measures  of reproduction investment There was a significant relationship among batch fecundity and  dry weights of eggs and the reproduction investment obtained  from the otoliths 0.020 4.5 log ( Batch Fecundity ) 4.0 0.015 Egg Weight (mg) 3.5 0.010 3.0 0.005 2.5 P < 0.01 P < 0.05 0.000 2.0 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 g g
  23. 23. Discussion: general Is angling a stochastic (random) process for life‐ history traits in marine wild populations?  The answer is no Some individuals have  Vulnerable fish higher probability to be caught Non‐vulnerable fish
  24. 24. Discussion: methods 1. General results showed good performance of the Bayesian  framework to estimate individual life‐history traits Lmax , g, h and T (Credibility intervals are relatively small and unbiased  for all the parameters) 2. Life‐history parameters were successfully estimated at  individual level 3. Estimations were independent of fish size and age 5 Fish size in otolith scale (mm) 4 3 2 1 0 0 5 10 15 Age (years)
  25. 25. Discussion: growth Our empirical approach demonstrated how angling exercises an  artificial selection against faster grow individuals  This result is well known (e.g. Biro and Post 2008_PNAS), but our  case‐study is one of the first studies in marine wild populations 4 Fishing  Fish size in otolith scale (mm) selection 3 2 1 Low High 0 0 5 10 15 20 Biro & Post PNAS 2008 Age (years)
  26. 26. Discussion: growth This fast grower individuals have higher grow ability with larger  maximum sizes In terms of fish size (length‐at‐age) “be smaller” should be the  optimal strategy to increase survival in an mortality‐ environment dominated by angling 240 220 200 Lmax 180 160 140 Low High
  27. 27. Discussion: reproduction investment (indirect measures) Fish sampled by angling have lower values of reproduction  investment Angling exercises an artificial selection against the individuals that  invest less energy to reproduction (and invest more energy to  somatic growth) In this scenario, increase  investment of energy to  reproduction rather than  somatic growth should be  the “optimal life‐history  strategy” in exploited  populations Lester et al 2004 PRSLB 2008
  28. 28. Discussion: reproduction investment (direct measures) Direct measures of reproduction investment (Quantity ~ batch  fecundity and Quality ~ dry weigth of eggs) agreed with  indirect estimations (g) Direct and indirect measures are correlated <‐> good to get a  “averaged” measure of reproduction investment in indirect  spawners ( batch fecundity is too variable at individual level) Shuter et al 2005 CJFAS
  29. 29. Discussion: age of maturation (T) It is expected that the age of maturation and fishing mortality are  negatively correlated, and exploited population tended to  mature earlier Thus fishing should drive selection against later maturation  individuals There were no differences (but a tendency) among the age of  maturation among the two kind of sampling 1.7 1.6 1.5 Two reasons explain that result: T 1.4 1.3 1) Early maturation per se (short life  1.2 1.1 span) <‐> mature at 1+ years Low High 2) In early maturations species,  relationship among T and M is not so  clear Lester et al 2004 PRSLB 2008
  30. 30. Discussion: immature growth (h) Values of growth prior maturation h, (mm year‐1) were highly  variable and posterior distribution were highly overlapped Here, we can not sure if the negative results is consequence of  the method (early maturation of Serranus results in poor  information in early stages) or the true lack of differences 4 50 Fish size in otolith scale (mm) 45 3 40 2 h 35 30 1 Low 25 High 0 Low High 0 5 10 15 20 Age (years)
  31. 31. Conclusions and implications Given the high heritability of this life‐history traits and the  intensity of size‐selective fish harvest of this species,  evolutionary responses in this sedentary fish population could  modify optimal strategies (driven evolutionary responses to  “be smaller”) Fisheries‐induced evolution Phenotype Physiology Genotype Behavior Vulnerability Selection Life‐history
  32. 32. Danke schön  &Thank you for your attention

×