This presentation was presented at the Ecotourism and Sustainable Tourism Conference 2011 (ESTC 2011), held in Hilton Head...
Alberta’s recreation & TOURISM resource DATA SYSTEM: <br />Informing collaborative land use planning and <br />decision ma...
Session objectives<br /><ul><li>To emphasize the importance of tourism destination planning
land use planning
To introduce some land use planning tools that support tourism destination planning and management
To encourage planners, operators and advocates to ensure tourism resources are identified</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recr...
Purpose
Inventories & Tools
Applications
Learnings & Encouragements</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />context<br /><ul><li...
Land use planning, decision making and tourism competitiveness
Ecotourism et al. is a resource based industry
Depend on the “recreation and tourism resources” (features, scenery, settings, perceived & actual environmental quality)
Understanding the supply of resources is critical to comprehensive land use planning & destination competitiveness
Alberta Recreation and Tourism Data System</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />PURP...
The “Resource”
Establish consistent & pragmatic provincial procedures
Enable evaluation and comparison of opportunities across all scales</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recreation & Tourism resou...
Alberta recreation & tourism FEATURES INVENTORY<br />
STReAM<br />RTFI<br />Scenic<br />Purpose of the recreation & tourism features inventory<br /><ul><li>Obtain geographical ...
Central GIS based inventory system
Collaborate & raise awareness with land managers & local governments
Furnish base data to be consumed by other inventories and models</li></ul>RTOS<br />
Definition of a Recreation / Tourism Feature<br />Recreation / Tourism Feature:<br />A biophysical, amenity, cultural or h...
Database design<br />
Database design<br />For each feature the inventory identifies it’s: <br /><ul><li>Scarcity
Sensitivity
Uniqueness
Usage Intensity
Attraction Capability
Accessibility
SIGNIFICNACE</li></li></ul><li>Engagement and collaboration<br /><ul><li>Initial Population
GoA field staff workshops conducted
County/MD workshops conducted
Tourism industry was not included in initial population</li></li></ul><li>Results<br />NORTH SASKATCHEWAN REGION<br />
Results<br />NORTH SASKATCHEWAN REGION<br />
Scenic resource Assessment of the NSR<br />
Purpose of the scenic resource assessment<br /><ul><li>Understand and incorporate public preferences
Map the scenic resource value of lands in the region
Create a systematic, repeatable and objective assessment methodology</li></li></ul><li>Engaging the public	<br />Visual pr...
Inherent scenic quality
Scenic integrity
Online Survey
Stratified random sample of 305 Albertans obtained
Region
Age
Gender
Participants rated photos on a seven-point Likertscale</li></li></ul><li>Results<br />Visual Preference Survey<br /><ul><l...
Rugged terrain
A variety of vegetation
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ESTC 2011 Presentation by Justin Ellis, O2 Planning + Design

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Ecotourism and Sustainable Tourism Conference (ESTC) (http://www.ecotourismconference.org/) presentation by Justin Ellis, Senior Planner, Parks, Recreation and Tourism, O2 Design + Planning - "Significant Tourism & Recreation Areas Model (STReAM)" - presented in September 2011. Organized by The International Ecotourism Society (http://www.ecotourism.org), the ESTC is a unique annual conference providing practical solutions to advance sustainability goals for the tourism industry.

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  • As identified by Megan Epler Wood in her Destination Management Tools for the 21 stcentrury, many jurisdictions and their budgets are dominately focused on destination and product marketing with very limited investment made into destination planning and management. Ralf Buckley, in his book Ecotourism Principles and Practices also stresses the need to ensure land use planning consider all land uses simultaneously to ensure adequate areas are set aside for tourism. This is what I, and my colleagues in Alberta Tourism, Parks and Recreation spent the last 2.5 years planning in North Eastern Alberta – Alberta’s Oilsands Region. Not just an issue in developing countries, this is also an issue in Alberta, Canada and I would suggest other provinces within Canada. Recreation and tourism benefit more than the individual participant or the local provider. Recreation and tourism are vital strategies in addressing many social issues that are prevalent in Alberta today. Physical and emotional well-being,Community well-being &amp; vitality,Economic diversification,Attraction and retention of skilled workforce.Recreation and tourism have been and continue to be developed and pursued as GoA priorities. The following policies – some of which are in draft form and are proceeding for approval – establish key priorities and a policy framework for advancing tourism and recreation in Alberta. LUF Active Alberta Plan for Parks Tourism Development StrategyTo realize the benefits of recreation and tourism, and to use recreation and tourism to address many social issues in Alberta, we must recognize the fundamental elements of a recreation and tourism opportunity. Recreation and tourism are resource based industries. Their competiveness and success depend upon access to the resource. The recreation and tourism resource is considered to be those features (natural or built), scenery and settings in which the recreation and tourism opportunities are facilitated. Failure to consider the resource is a failure to consider the most basic and vital elements associated with the industries success. To date, Alberta has not completed a coordinated, integrated and provincially consistent approach to documenting the province’s recreation and tourism resources. The develop a better understanding of the supply of this important resource, TPR has moved forward in creating the “Alberta Recreation and Tourism Data System”.
  • A lot of data exists in disparate locations. Need to consolidate data to enable comprehensive and consistent planning.
  • Route features – water, vertical and land base routes, put ins, take outs, staging areas etcAccommodation features – resorts, cabins, buts, b&amp;b, campgrounds, bctry campgroundsCultural Features – museums, interp centersFacility Features – golf courses, ski hills, arenas etcGeneral Tourism Features – theme parks, built landmarks, agri tourismLanform Features – erratics, hoodos, glaciers, beachesWater Features - rivers, lakes, wetlands, rapids, waterfalls, reservoirsVegetation Features – rare / unique plants, edible plants, old growth forestWildlife Features – nest locations, fishing areas, habitat areasHistoric Features – heritage buildings, historic forts etcArchaeological Features – tee pee rings, pictographs, petrolgyphs, Rec / Toruism Usage Areas – random camping, intensive OHV areas etc
  • Scarcity is a relative measure of the occurrence of the feature type.Possible rating values are:. Very High – few, if any similar features occur in the province- e.g. fossil museums such as the Royal Tyrrell Museum. High – similar features exist in the province, but few occurlocally- e.g. ski hills. Medium – similar features exist in the region, but few occurlocally- e.g. golf courses. Low – Many similar features occur locally and regionallye.g. islands in the North Saskatchewan RiverSensitivity is a subjective rating of the relative vulnerability ofthe feature to alteration or destruction caused by landscapechange from disturbance, development, or over-use.Possible rating values are:. Very High – disturbance, development, or over-use wouldlikely result in a loss of the feature’s ability to attract andsupport recreation or tourism- e.g. wildfi re burns the province’s oldest white bark pinetree. High – disturbance, development, or over-use would likely result in a signifi cant degradation of the feature’s ability toattract and support recreation or tourism- e.g. Brule sand dunes. Medium – disturbance, development, or over-use wouldlikely result in some reduction of the feature’s ability toattract and support recreation or tourism- e.g. Forest operations adjacent to a popular hiking trail. Low – disturbance, development, or over-use would likelyresult in little or no degradation of the feature- e.g. Facility development adjacent to the world’s largestbaseball gloveUniqueness is a subjective rating of the distinctiveness orunusual characteristics of a feature from others of the sametype.Usage Intensity is a subjective estimate of the relative level ofrecreation / tourism use of a feature compared to other featuresof the same type.Possible rating values are:. Very High – the feature is frequented often and visitors willalmost always encounter other visitors- e.g. Marmot Basin ski hill. High – the feature is popular and it is common for visitors toencounter visitors- e.g. backcountry campsite in Kananaskis Country. Medium – few people visit or use the feature at this time andencounters with other visitors is rare- e.g. fi re lookout trails. Low – almost no one visits or uses the feature at this time andencounters with other visitors should not be expected- e.g. fl y-in access lakesPossible rating values are:. Very High – the feature is unique among features of thesame type- e.g. tallest waterfall such as Bridal Veil Falls. High – the feature is one of a few features that stand outfrom the feature type- e.g. Lesser Slave Lake (one of three lakes over 400square kilometres in Alberta). Medium – the feature is one of a large group of characteristicfeatures of the same type- e.g. backcountry campsites with feed bins for horses. Low – the feature is similar to most features of the sametypee.g. boat launchesActivity Attraction is an estimate of the current attractioncapability of a feature.Possible rating values are:. Very High – people will travel from throughout Canada orbeyond to see or experience the feature- e.g. Head Smashed-In Buffalo Jump. High – people from Alberta often plan multi-day trips aroundvisiting the feature- e.g. Pigeon Lake. Medium – people will travel 2-3 hours to visit the feature- e.g. ice climbing routes on the David Thompson highway. Low – the feature is likely to attract only people within a shorttravel distancee.g. small wetland used by locals for waterfowl huntingAccessibility is a subjective rating of the nature and ease ofaccess to the feature.Possible rating values are:. Very High – the feature is accessed via a high grade majorhighway- e.g. Dunvegan Historic Site. High – the feature is accessed via an improved (includinggravel) road that can be travelled by most vehicle types- e.g. Bighorn Dam. Medium – the feature is accessed via dirt road or trail byspecialty vehicles (e.g four-wheel drive or off-highwayvehicles), animal or human power.- e.g. Kakwa Falls. Low – the feature is accessed via trail by foot, bicycle, orhorse travel or other non motorized means.e.g. Willmore backcountry campsiteSignificance is a calculated rating derived from the other ratings with the exception of Accessibility.The Significance rating is calculated numerically by converting the Low to Very High ratings to a numericscale from 1 to 4. The ratings for Scarcity, Sensitivity, Uniqueness, Usage Intensity, and Activity Attractionare then multiplied by an impact index and summed.. Scarcity – rating(1-4) * impact index of 4 = score out of 16. Sensitivity – rating(1-4) * impact index of 4 = score out of 16. Uniqueness – rating(1-4) * impact index of 4 = score out of 16. Usage Intensity – rating(1-4) * impact index of 3 = score out of 12. Activity Attraction – rating(1-4) * impact index of 3 = score out of 12The resulting sum value is then divided by the maximum value of 72 to acquire a percentage that isconverted into a rating of Low (0-25%), Medium(26-50%), High(51-75%), or Very High(76-100%). APython script has been created to facilitate calculating the Significance rating for features in the RTFI.
  • Area around Camrose
  • Summaries can be run at any scale desired…. This is regional The RTFI, particularly when it is combined with the other datasets (RTOS) allows planners and managers to understand, at a coarse level, the supply and geographic distribution of tourism features and therefore products. Compare with demand side information. Supports destination planning, product development, destination life cycle assessment, land use planning and bylaw / ordinance and policy development etc etc… Also able to inform and provide base support spatially explicit marketing and destination promotion through new technologies…
  • Landscape Aesthetics: A Handbook for Scenery Management (1995) USDA Forest ServiceVisual Resource Assessment: A User Guide (1983) BC MOE South East Queensland Regional Plan 2005-2026: Implementation Guideline No. 8 - Identifying and protecting scenic amenity values (2007) Queensland Government, Office of Urban Management, 2007Plus academic and professional studies specifically testing the impact of:Water VisibilityMountains and Terrain RuggednessVegetation VarietyForestry cut blocksRoadsExtensive review of visual preference survey research: Over sixty sources covering research from the last four decadesExtensive field work: Over 2,000 km traveled within the North Saskatchewan Region4,621 photos captured
  • Scenic QualityA measure of “the scenic importance of a landscape based on human perceptions of the intrinsic beauty of landform, water characteristics, vegetation pattern, and cultural land use” (USDA 1995).Scenic Quality measured from Landscape Character Units:Landscapes with a consistent visual experienceGenerally homogenous in landform, vegetation, land usesInherent state, though agricultural landscapes also includedGeographically uniqueCharacterized by the landscapes that can be viewed from itEach represented by a survey photo of the landscape in a natural stateScenic IntegrityIndicates the degree to which deviations from or alterations of the existing landscape character affect perception of scenic quality Scenic Integrity measured from typical or common disturbancesIncluded:Major and Minor RoadsRailroadsHigh-Voltage PowerlinesOil/Gas Wells and Storage TanksPipelinesMajor Industrial FacilitiesForestry Cut BlocksCutlinesRecreational lodging facilitiesWind farmMines
  • INTERVENTION Results: Oil / Gap Well, Industrial Facility and mine experienced between a -45% to – 55% change from the pre-intervention ratings.
  • Landscape visibility mapped from major and scenic travel corridors, and recreation and tourism features.“A Visually Sensitive Area (VSA) is an area that is considered to be sufficiently sensitive to visual alteration to warrant special consideration in strategic and operational planning” (BC MOF 1997).The view from places where the view is important to the viewer
  • Combination of Effective Scenic Quality and Visual Sensitivity, to identify generalized areas which require scenic resource management priority.5 Effective Scenic Quality Classes crossed with 5 Visual Value Classes to created 25 Visual Value classes
  • Roads, consider rating for river and trails – same data, can be used but only roads are mapped here.
  • Attributes of a setting affect one’s recreation/tourism experienceBy managing both activities and settings, managers can facilitate recreation and tourism opportunities / experiencesOriginal ROS concept described by Clark and Stankey (1979)Settings can be understood as being composed of many setting conditionsEach setting condition is a spectrumSetting condition spectrums combine to describe a ROS
  • Mapping precedentsASRD pilot ROS map, July 2010New Zealand Department of Conservation ROSBoth were GIS-driven analysesA GIS model converts inputs to individual map layers–spatial proxies–each representing a single setting criterionProxies developed from:Methods in BC, New Zealand,initial ASRD ROS mappingSensitivity testingExpert review &amp; feedbackField validation not conducted
  • Consider the R/TOS within a day trip from regional population centersIllustrates where the recreation setting supply is most likely the most in demandManage for variety of settings based on relative accessibility
  • Full range of settings (under provincial jurisdiction)Front-country and Developed settings characterize the majority of the NSRSettings that allow for more primitive, natural experiences primarily to the west.Some opportunities to the north, north east, and south eastBeaver Hills offers diversity of settings within close proximity to Edmonton
  • Demand-side approaches are resource intensive, difficult over a wider area.Many supply-based recreation / tourism resource studies have relied on scoring criteria:BC Recreation Features InventoryNZ Resource Assessment for Recreation and TourismSunshine Coast Forest DistrictCA National Landmarks Program
  • Characteristics are included in STReAM to identify:Presence of clusters of recreation / tourism featuresFeatures that are scarce within the regionFeatures that present management concernsScarce, desirable settingsProvides a consistent, repeatable approach for defining key recreation / tourism areas
  • Feature – is a must - more unique – higher the weight - more scarce – higher the weight - more sensitive – higher the weight - higher the usage intensity – higher the weight. Setting – is critical - the less frequent the setting occurrence, the higher the weight. Scenery – coping will occur. Based on the theory that the opportuity is driven by the feature(s) that facilitate the activity and to a lesser extent, the setting and scenery. People cant ice climb if there isnt a water fall / seep, cant swim if there isnt water etc.. Access – is important but, in many cases, can be developed / modified to be more or less of a detractor for visitors. Distance to population centers was factored in. The further away, it was assumed, all things being equal, the fewer visitors. Of course, this depends on the nature of the features / setting combinations.
  • These conclusion apply to all landbases in Alberta, regardless of the land manager.
  • ESTC 2011 Presentation by Justin Ellis, O2 Planning + Design

    1. 1. This presentation was presented at the Ecotourism and Sustainable Tourism Conference 2011 (ESTC 2011), held in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, USA, from September 19th-21st. Organized by The International Ecotourism Society (TIES), the ESTC is a unique annual conference providing practical solutions to advance sustainability goals for the tourism industry.<br />Learn more about the ESTC: http://www.ecotourismconference.org<br />ESTC on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ESTC_Tourism<br />ESTC on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ESTC.Tourism<br />The International Ecotourism Society | web www.ecotourism.orgemail info@ecotourism.org | tel +1 202 506 5033<br />
    2. 2. Alberta’s recreation & TOURISM resource DATA SYSTEM: <br />Informing collaborative land use planning and <br />decision making in support of tourism<br />ESTCSeptember 21, 2011<br />Justin Ellis<br />Senior Planner<br />Parks, Recreation & Tourism<br />
    3. 3. Session objectives<br /><ul><li>To emphasize the importance of tourism destination planning
    4. 4. land use planning
    5. 5. To introduce some land use planning tools that support tourism destination planning and management
    6. 6. To encourage planners, operators and advocates to ensure tourism resources are identified</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />PRESENTATION Overview<br /><ul><li>Context
    7. 7. Purpose
    8. 8. Inventories & Tools
    9. 9. Applications
    10. 10. Learnings & Encouragements</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />context<br /><ul><li>Tourism needs to establish itself as a land based industry
    11. 11. Land use planning, decision making and tourism competitiveness
    12. 12. Ecotourism et al. is a resource based industry
    13. 13. Depend on the “recreation and tourism resources” (features, scenery, settings, perceived & actual environmental quality)
    14. 14. Understanding the supply of resources is critical to comprehensive land use planning & destination competitiveness
    15. 15. Alberta Recreation and Tourism Data System</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />PURPOSE<br /><ul><li>Acquire spatially explicit data on the supply of recreation & tourism “opportunities”
    16. 16. The “Resource”
    17. 17. Establish consistent & pragmatic provincial procedures
    18. 18. Enable evaluation and comparison of opportunities across all scales</li></li></ul><li>Alberta’s Recreation & Tourism resource DATA SYSTEM<br />concept<br />overview<br />
    19. 19. Alberta recreation & tourism FEATURES INVENTORY<br />
    20. 20. STReAM<br />RTFI<br />Scenic<br />Purpose of the recreation & tourism features inventory<br /><ul><li>Obtain geographical data as to where rec/tourism features exist
    21. 21. Central GIS based inventory system
    22. 22. Collaborate & raise awareness with land managers & local governments
    23. 23. Furnish base data to be consumed by other inventories and models</li></ul>RTOS<br />
    24. 24. Definition of a Recreation / Tourism Feature<br />Recreation / Tourism Feature:<br />A biophysical, amenity, cultural or historical feature which supports or has the potential to support one or more recreation / tourism activities<br />
    25. 25. Database design<br />
    26. 26. Database design<br />For each feature the inventory identifies it’s: <br /><ul><li>Scarcity
    27. 27. Sensitivity
    28. 28. Uniqueness
    29. 29. Usage Intensity
    30. 30. Attraction Capability
    31. 31. Accessibility
    32. 32. SIGNIFICNACE</li></li></ul><li>Engagement and collaboration<br /><ul><li>Initial Population
    33. 33. GoA field staff workshops conducted
    34. 34. County/MD workshops conducted
    35. 35. Tourism industry was not included in initial population</li></li></ul><li>Results<br />NORTH SASKATCHEWAN REGION<br />
    36. 36. Results<br />NORTH SASKATCHEWAN REGION<br />
    37. 37. Scenic resource Assessment of the NSR<br />
    38. 38. Purpose of the scenic resource assessment<br /><ul><li>Understand and incorporate public preferences
    39. 39. Map the scenic resource value of lands in the region
    40. 40. Create a systematic, repeatable and objective assessment methodology</li></li></ul><li>Engaging the public <br />Visual preference survey<br /><ul><li>Developed and delivered visual preference survey to understand perceptions related to:
    41. 41. Inherent scenic quality
    42. 42. Scenic integrity
    43. 43. Online Survey
    44. 44. Stratified random sample of 305 Albertans obtained
    45. 45. Region
    46. 46. Age
    47. 47. Gender
    48. 48. Participants rated photos on a seven-point Likertscale</li></li></ul><li>Results<br />Visual Preference Survey<br /><ul><li>Landscapes rated high were characterized by:
    49. 49. Rugged terrain
    50. 50. A variety of vegetation
    51. 51. Rivers and/or lakes
    52. 52. Landscapes rated lowwere generally flat, monotonous agricultural landscapes
    53. 53. Overall, no landscape received a negative visual preference rating
    54. 54. Interventions were generally perceived to detract from the scenic quality of the landscape</li></li></ul><li>Modelling framework<br />Conceptual Modelling Process<br />
    55. 55. Scenic Resource Assessment<br />Scenic Quality<br />
    56. 56. Scenic Resource Assessment<br />Scenic Integrity<br />
    57. 57. Scenic Resource Assessment<br />Effective scenic Quality<br />
    58. 58. Scenic Resource Assessment<br />Visual Sensitivity<br />
    59. 59. Scenic Resource Assessment<br />Visual Value<br />
    60. 60. Scenic corridors<br />
    61. 61. Alberta recreation & tourism opportunity spectrum<br />
    62. 62. Purpose of the Alberta Recreation & Tourism Opportunity Spectrum<br />Map and understand the supply of recreation / tourism settings<br />Establish a provincially consistent, multi-scale and modular GIS modeling methodology<br />Enable scenario assessments and the evaluation of land use decisions<br />
    63. 63. A recreation and tourism opportunity defined<br />
    64. 64. Alberta’s Recreation and Tourism Opportunity Spectrum <br />Defining the Spectrum of Settings in Alberta<br />RECREATION & TOURISM OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM<br />Adapted from US BLM, 1998, and Government BC, 1998<br />
    65. 65. Rtos criteria<br />Mapping the Setting<br />Combination of components/criteria indicate a type of setting<br />Mapping is a matter of identifying which combinations of components/criteria are present in an area<br />Many possible combinations of setting criteria<br />
    66. 66. Results<br />
    67. 67. Results<br />North Saskatchewan<br />
    68. 68. Application<br />Modelling changes over time – Forestry Near Big Horn FLUZ<br />R/TOS model can illustrate changes to setting over time<br />Multi-decade forestry scenario<br />Cut blocks created<br />Cut blocks regrow<br />Access roads<br />
    69. 69. Application<br />Modelling changes over time – Forestry Near Big Horn FLUZ<br />Decade 5<br />
    70. 70. Alberta Significant Tourism / Recreation Areas Model<br />
    71. 71. Purpose of the Alberta significant tourism & recreation areas model<br /><ul><li>To spatially identify the lands that are most important to the recreation and tourism industry
    72. 72. Provincially consistent procedures</li></li></ul><li>Supply side approach<br />Recreation/tourism demand and participation<br />Tourism resources, their characteristics and their surroundings are evaluated for their potential to facilitate tourism opportunities. <br />
    73. 73. Model Must Reflect the supply variables that affect the CHOICE OF Desirable destinations<br /><ul><li>Attractiveness can be influenced by:
    74. 74. Aesthetic quality of surroundings
    75. 75. Scarcity of the settings
    76. 76. Rare, unique, sensitive, elements / features
    77. 77. Accessibility of locations</li></li></ul><li>Theory<br />SETTING DETRACTORS AND COPING<br /><ul><li>Detractors are “any elements in the setting that are perceived by the recreationist to diminish the quality of the recreation or tourism experience (Miller and McCool, 2003).
    78. 78. Users cope with detractors by:
    79. 79. Alternate site selection
    80. 80. Time-shifting visits
    81. 81. Changing the detractors or effects
    82. 82. Adjusting expectations
    83. 83. Choosing not to participate
    84. 84. Ability for visitors to cope was reflected in the model’s criteria weightings
    85. 85. Feature – is a must
    86. 86. Setting – is critical
    87. 87. Scenery – coping will occur
    88. 88. Access – can be developed</li></li></ul><li>Methods<br />SIGNIFICANCE CRITERIA<br /><ul><li>Fifteen characteristics:
    89. 89. Natural RTFI Features
    90. 90. Scarcity
    91. 91. Sensitivity
    92. 92. Usage Intensity
    93. 93. Uniqueness
    94. 94. Point density
    95. 95. Line density
    96. 96. Built RTFI Features
    97. 97. Scarcity
    98. 98. Sensitivity
    99. 99. Usage Intensity
    100. 100. Uniqueness
    101. 101. Point density
    102. 102. Line density
    103. 103. Recreation/Tourism Opportunity Spectrum
    104. 104. Scenic Value
    105. 105. Accessibility</li></li></ul><li>Methods<br />Calculating Significance<br />Index values from input layers weighted by relative importance to recreation / tourism significance<br />Density of features<br />Quality of features<br />Quality of setting<br />Summation of values provides final Significance Score<br />
    106. 106. Methods<br />IDENTIFYING Significant AReas<br />From the map of significance score, areas of high significance can be identified<br />Two methods:<br />Absolute: Values above a threshold are considered significant<br />Relative: Values significantly higher than the local area score are considered significant<br />Areas are processed to remove small islands, linear features<br />
    107. 107. Alberta’s north saskatchewan region SIGNIFICANCE Score<br />
    108. 108. Significant Areas<br />
    109. 109. Results<br />Evaluating significant AREAS<br /><ul><li>Can identify the location and distribution of RTSA’s
    110. 110. Majority of the Significant Areas are found in Boreal settings
    111. 111. Understand the administrative / jurisdictional responsibilities for the land
    112. 112. Number of SRTAs in the Green Zone
    113. 113. Evaluate the extent of RTSA”s that are currently protected within Parks or other conservation regime’s
    114. 114. Less significant overlap between SRTAs, PPAs.</li></li></ul><li>Results<br />INDIVIDUAL AREAS<br />As part of STReAM, the 46 Significant Areas were identified and isolated for further analysis<br />Individual area reports developed which include:<br />Major characteristics and features<br />R/TOS, scenic statistics<br />Overlapping administrative / land use management areas (FMAs, Green Zone, etc.)<br />Historical features found within areas<br />Inventory of all features in the Significant Area<br />
    115. 115. “STREAM” Conclusions<br />NEXT STEPS<br /><ul><li>Different applications of STReAM are possible:
    116. 116. Different times of the year
    117. 117. Different users
    118. 118. Different scales / study areas
    119. 119. Scenario analysis
    120. 120. Cumulative effect management
    121. 121. Related to demands
    122. 122. When data is available</li></li></ul><li>Project learnings & encouragements<br />The AB Rec / Tourism Data system can be used to: <br /><ul><li>Plan to meet recreation and tourism target market demands,
    123. 123. Inform the relationship between rec / tourism and other land uses
    124. 124. Spatially predict influences of land use decisions on rec / tourism opportunities
    125. 125. At all scales and on all lands,
    126. 126. Significance and intensity of influence,
    127. 127. Location of changes.
    128. 128. Inform establishment of clear rec / tourism management objectives through land use planning and decision-making,</li></li></ul><li>Project learnings & encouragements<br /><ul><li>Design management strategies to improve compatibility between competing land uses
    129. 129. Inform and communicate rec / tourism opportunities to the public
    130. 130. As an industry, it is critical to make your values known – spatially
    131. 131. Critical to ensure the connection between land use and tourism competitiveness is understood
    132. 132. Organize – big and small</li>

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