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Aids: Then and Now Webquest
 

Aids: Then and Now Webquest

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    Aids: Then and Now Webquest Aids: Then and Now Webquest Presentation Transcript

    • AIDS: Then and Now Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 10th Grade Biology Designed by Elizabeth Winder-Chavey [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page picture from Flickr: dbking
    • Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] In recent years the HIV/AIDS epidemic has captured worldwide attention from individuals, the media and even politicians. However; throughout history there are many examples of diseases that have caused widespread panic and devastation for years until a treatment or vaccine was developed and they seemed to vanish from public attention. For example, do you know anyone who has had typhoid fever or the bubonic plague? How about polio or tuberculosis? Do you lay awake at night worrying about catching chicken pox or the measles? The answer is probably “no”, but at various points in history these were the diseases that people talked and worried about. Unfortunately, while there are medications that can greatly increase the lifespan of people living with HIV and AIDS, there is still no cure for AIDS. At this very moment scientists are hard at work investigating possible vaccines against HIV, but there have been no successful trials so far. Now imagine that you are a leading scientist in the field of communicable diseases. You live in a future time when a vaccine against HIV has existed for so long that knowledge of this disease has disappeared from public knowledge. Students only learn about AIDS in history class. There are no longer public service announcements on the TV or radio educating people about how to protect themselves. The one artifact that keeps the name in public knowledge is the AIDS Quilt , because it is on display at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History . Suddenly the HIV virus has reappeared in this future civilization! What lessons can these people learn by reviewing the history of the first AIDS epidemic? Will they repeat the same mistakes as the first time? You and your fellow scientists will be called upon to research HIV and AIDS and find a way to teach the public what you know about AIDS.
    • The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • The government has just contacted you, a leading scientist in the field of communicable diseases, and a group of your fellow researchers with an urgent message! It is your job to research the history of the first AIDS epidemic and educate people so they don’t make the same mistakes made the first time around. This could be a hard job, remember the old saying “history repeats itself”. But it is important you succeed since the survival of your society depends on you!
      • To begin your research you will first need to refresh and enrich your understanding of HIV and AIDS by investigating and taking notes on:
      • How HIV and AIDS function in the body
      • How HIV and AIDS can be prevented
      • How HIV and AIDS are transmitted
      • How to know if you have HIV or AIDS
      • Then you will continue your research by investigating the history of the AIDS epidemic. As you do this you will want to take notes on any misunderstandings or stereotypes people had about HIV /AIDS along with things that had a positive or negative impact on society’s understanding or opinions of AIDS and AIDS patients. Hint: One major event was the development of the AIDS Quilt!
      • Once you have completed your research, you and your fellow scientists will work to develop a new version of the AIDS Quilt. This time, instead of making a quilt to commemorate victims of AIDS you will be making a quilt of “AIDS Truths”. The purpose of this quilt will be to inform your future society and help create a positive public awareness of the disease.
      Title
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Good, you are already at the lab and ready to go! Make sure your research partners have also arrived. You should be working with 3 to 4 other scientists. You will also need your lab notebook and a pen or pencil for taking notes.
      • 1. First let’s learn a little more about HIV and AIDS. After looking through the websites listed below you should be able to answer the following questions:
        • What do HIV and AIDS stand for?
        • What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?
        • How can you protect yourself against HIV?
        • What activities make you at high risk for getting HIV?
        • How do you know if you have HIV?
        • What kinds of treatments are available for someone with HIV or AIDS?
        • What was the origin of the HIV virus (where did it come from)?
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/101-What-is-AIDS.html
        • http://www.aids.org/info/FAQs.html
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/106-HIV-Life-Cycle.html
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/106-HIV-Life-Cycle.html
        • **Don’t forget to take notes in your lab notebook and label all information with the website where you found it. Remember: you are a professional scientist!**
      • 2. Now it’s time to review the history of the AIDS epidemic. Just like any disease, AIDS has greatly affected society. As you read about how society reacted to the first AIDS epidemic, take plenty of notes on any misunderstanding or stereotypes that people had. Also make notes of any positive or negative actions people or groups of people took to combat this disease.
        • http://fohn.net/history-of-aids/
        • http://aidshistory.nih.gov/home.html (this is a long article so it would be best to assign a few sections to each group member)
      • Continue with The Process
    • The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • 3. Before you start to construct your new version of the AIDS Quilt you should learn more about the original:
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/history.htm
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/quiltfacts.htm
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/newsroom/images.htm (scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “view thumbnail” to see images of the quilt)
      • 4. Now you are ready to start construction of your own quilt! Here are a few things to keep in mind:
        • This is a group project, so make sure you and your fellow scientists make a plan and determine what each person will work on
        • The patches of the quilt should each contain one “truth” about HIV/AIDS or one action that had a positive impact on public understanding about HIV or AIDS. (e.g . “You CANNOT get HIV from sitting on a toilet seat” or “When Princess Diana visited and hugged AIDS patients she showed that it is OK to touch people with AIDS” )
        • The patches of the quilt should all be the same size
        • Your group can decide to make the patches on the computer or by hand, but they should all be creative and decorative
      • 5. Once your group has finished all the patches you should find a spot in the classroom where there is enough room to put all the pieces together into your final product- the quilt!
      • 6. When all the groups have finished, each group will give a short presentation of their quilt. Be prepared to explain the patches of your quilt and answer any questions other groups may have. Each group member will also turn in his/her lab notebook at this time.
    • Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Continue with Evaluation Exemplary Accomplished Developing Beginning Score Information Gathering Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically. Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate. Scientific Knowledge Explanations in notebook indicate a clear and accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook indicate a relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook indicate relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook do not illustrate much understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Journal/Log - Appearance Several entries made and all are labeled neatly with the website they came from. Several entries are made and most of the entries are labeled neatly with the website they came from. Several entries are made and most of the entries are labeled legibly with the website they came from. Few entries are made AND/OR many entries are not labeled with the website they came from or very difficult to read. Creativity Several of the graphics or artwork used in the quilt reflect an exceptional degree of student creativity in their creation and/or display One or two of the graphics or artwork used in the quilt reflect student creativity in their creation and/or display. One or two graphics or artwork were made or customized by the student, but the ideas were typical rather than creative (.e.g, clip art without added embellishment). The student did not include any graphics or artwork in the quilt.
    • Evaluation Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Exemplary Accomplished Developing Beginning Score Quality of Construction The quilt shows considerable attention to construction. All items are carefully and securely attached to each other. The patches are all the same size. The quilt shows attention to construction.All items are carefully and securely attached to each other. The patches are all the same size. The quilt shows some attention to construction. All items are securely attached to each other. The patches are approximately the same size. The quilt was put together sloppily. Items appear to be just "thrown together". Patches may be loose or hanging over the edges.The patches are noticeably different sizes. Presentation Preparedness The group is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. The group seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. The group is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. The group does not seem at all prepared to present. Listens to Other Presentations Listens intently. Does not make distracting noises or movements. Listens intently but has one distracting noise or movement. Sometimes does not appear to be listening but is not distracting. Sometimes does not appear to be listening and has distracting noises or movements.
    • Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Congratulations! You and your fellow scientists have done good work. Your AIDS Truths Quilt is currently touring throughout the United States and is scheduled for an upcoming world tour. By viewing the quilt many people have become more aware of what HIV and AIDS are and how to protect themselves. Many public and private organizations have also taken important steps in recognizing the seriousness of the disease by setting up anonymous testing centers and treatment programs for victims of the disease. Governments of many leading countries, including the U.S., have also allocated large sums of money for studies about HIV and AIDS and are busy gathering scientists for this important research. It looks like many of the mistakes of the past will be avoided thanks to your hard work! Flickr: austin tx Flickr: enric archivell Flickr: aJ GAZMEN – GucciBeaR
    • Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] All pictures from Flickr : dbking, austin tx, aJ GAZMEN- GucciBeaR, enric archivell This WebQuest was created from the WebQuest template available on The WebQuest Page For any updated versions of this Webquest or for other WebQuests go to The WebQuest Slideshare Group Thanks to Dr. Folkstead and the students of EDUC 331 Summer Term 2008 for all your help in creating my first WebQuest!
    • AIDS: Then and Now (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 10th Grade Biology Designed by Elizabeth Winder-Chavey [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Picture from Flickr: dbking Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was created as a project for EDUC 331 Summer Term 2008 at Colorado State University. In this WebQuest, students take on the role of scientists in the field of communicable disease in a future society in which a vaccine against HIV has existed for so long that basic knowledge of HIV and AIDS has disappeared from public awareness. When the virus suddenly reappears (perhaps due to a mutation) the government calls on these scientists to research HIV/AIDS and develop a new version of the AIDS Quilt in order to inform the future society about the disease. This lesson is intended to guide students through an exploration of the history of the AIDS epidemic. By learning about the social and historical implications of this epidemic, students should gain a better understanding of how science and disease influence people and shape society. Students will also have an opportunity to learn more about the AIDS Quilt and how it has shaped public awareness and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS and its victims. As students review and refresh their understanding of HIV/AIDS and research the history of the epidemic, they will be required to keep a lab notebook and record which websites they retrieved information from. Students will then be asked to use their understanding of HIV/AIDS along with creativity and teamwork in order to develop a new AIDS “Truth” Quilt. . Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is centered around skills and knowledge acquired in a high school level biology course. It also involves social studies and art to a lesser extent. This Webquest can be implemented during the unit on DNA and RNA Structure, Function and Synthesis and will provide a real life context for understanding how DNA and RNA work and why they are important. This lesson would be an appropriate follow-up for a lesson that introduces HIV/AIDS. Students should already have a basic understanding of how the virus works and how the disease progresses. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Colorado 9-12 th Grade Science Standards Addressed:
      • 3.11. DNA has a general structure and function and a role in heredity and protein synthesis (for example: replication of DNA and the role of RNA in protein synthesis)
      • 5.1. print and visual media can be evaluated for scientific evidence, bias, or opinion
      • 5.5. scientific knowledge changes and accumulates over time; usually the changes that take place are small modifications of prior knowledge but major shifts in the scientific view of how the world works do occur
      • 5.6. interrelationships among science, technology and human activity lead to further discoveries that impact the world in positive and negative ways
      • Lesson Objectives:
      • Students will…
      • Understand the origin and function of HIV/AIDS
      • Understand how to protect against HIV and get tested for HIV
      • Be able to describe the history of the AIDS epidemic and identify positive and negative aspects of this history
      • Apply critical thinking skills to interpreting scientific and historical events
      • Be able to make inferences regarding scientific and historical events
      • Increase their awareness of the influence of science on society
      • Gather information from a variety of websites and accurately record the information and its sources
      • Improve teamwork skills including communication, cooperation and collaboration
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
      • 1. Getting Started:
      • This WebQuest is intended to be completed over a few days. It might work best to have students collect research in their lab notebooks on the first day and create the patches and the completed quilt on the second day. A third day may be necessary for the presentations of the quilts depending on the speed at which students complete these tasks and the size of the groups.
      • Students should be divided into groups of approximately 4 people. It is ideal to have at least 4 students in a group so that each group can produce enough patches to make a quilt in a reasonable amount of time.
      • Each student will need a lab notebook and a writing utensil. The lab notebook can be an actual scientific notebook or a few sheets of paper stapled together. Either way it should be something that they can turn in to you at the end of the project.
      • Ideally each student would have computer to work from; however, computers could be shared between group members if necessary.
      • 2. After students are divided in their groups they should begin by learning more about HIV and AIDS. After looking through the websites listed below students should be able to answer the following questions:
        • What do HIV and AIDS stand for?
        • What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?
        • How can you protect yourself against HIV?
        • What activities make you at high risk for getting HIV?
        • How do you know if you have HIV?
        • What kinds of treatments are available for someone with HIV or AIDS?
        • What was the origin of the HIV virus (where did it come from)?
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/101-What-is-AIDS.html
        • http://www.aids.org/info/FAQs.html
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/106-HIV-Life-Cycle.html
        • http://www.aids.org/factSheets/106-HIV-Life-Cycle.html
      • Continue with The Process
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
      • 3. Next students will review the history of the AIDS epidemic and how AIDS has affected society. As students read about how society reacted to the first AIDS epidemic they should take notes on any misunderstanding or stereotypes that people had and any positive or negative actions people or groups of people took to combat this disease.
        • http://fohn.net/history-of-aids/
        • http://aidshistory.nih.gov/home.html (this is a long article so it would be best for the groups to assign a few sections to each group member)
      • 4. It will be important to remind students that part of their grade will be based on their lab notebook. They should keep legible and well organized notes on information they find on HIV/AIDS and the history of the epidemic. Each piece of information should be labeled with the website it was found on. You may want to give a specific example of how you would like information to be recorded and websites to be cited.
      • 5. Before students start to construct their new version of the AIDS “Truth” Quilt they can use these pages to learn more about the original:
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/history.htm
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/quiltfacts.htm
        • http://www.aidsquilt.org/newsroom/images.htm (scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “view thumbnail” to see images of the quilt)
      • .
      • Continue with The Process
    • The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
      • 6. When the groups are ready to begin construction of their quilts there are a few things you might want to remind them of:
        • This is a group project, so make sure you and your fellow scientists make a plan and determine what each person will work on
        • The patches of the quilt should each contain one “truth” about HIV/AIDS or one action that had a positive impact on public understanding about HIV or AIDS. (e.g . “You CANNOT get HIV from sitting on a toilet seat” or “When Princess Diana visited and hugged AIDS patients she showed that it is OK to touch people with AIDS” )
        • The patches of the quilt should all be the same size
        • Your group can decide to make the patches on the computer or by hand, but they should all be creative and decorative
      • 7. You will need to provide students with some materials if they are making their patches by hand. Basic supplies include: paper, markers/crayons/colored pencils and scissors. You may also choose to include any variety of additional materials such as fabric, feathers or other items found at any craft store. In this case, you would also need glue.
      • 8. Once each group has finished all the patches, you should assign them a spot in the classroom where there is enough room to put all the pieces together. Students will need tape or some other type of adhesive to produce their final product- the quilt!
      • 9. When all the groups have finished, each group will give a short presentation of their quilt. You might encourage other groups to ask questions or have the group explain their favorite patches. After all groups have presented you could ask the class to compare and contrast the quilts. Each group member will also turn in his/her lab notebook at this time.
    • Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
      • Resources Required:
      • One computer per student (or a few computers for each group if one computer per student is not possible)
      • Lab notebooks (these may be actual notebooks or sheets of paper stapled together)
      • Materials for hand-made quilt patches: paper, markers/crayons/colored pencils, scissors and tape are basic materials required. Additional materials for embellishment could also be provided.
      • Human Resources:
      • This lesson is designed so that it should be possible for any high school science teacher to implement without additional assistance. However, it is likely that students will have questions as they research the various websites. Therefore, if aides or volunteers are available they could assist in answering questions and/or assembling quilts.
      Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page The rubric included below is a suggestion for how students might be evaluated on this project. The rubric includes three basic categories: lab notebook/data collection, final product/quilt and presentation of the quilt. The lab notebook/data collection should be graded individually since each student will turn in a notebook. The quilt and its presentation should be graded for the entire team. It might also be helpful to include a peer evaluation in which group members evaluate each other in order to include a teamwork/collaboration piece into the evaluation. Continue with Evaluation Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Exemplary Accomplished Developing Beginning Score Information Gathering Accurate information taken from several sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources in a systematic manner. Accurate information taken from a couple of sources but not systematically. Information taken from only one source and/or information not accurate. Scientific Knowledge Explanations in notebook indicate a clear and accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook indicate a relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook indicate relatively accurate understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Explanations in notebook do not illustrate much understanding of scientific principles underlying the project Journal/Log - Appearance Several entries made and all are labeled neatly with the website they came from. Several entries are made and most of the entries are labeled neatly with the website they came from. Several entries are made and most of the entries are labeled legibly with the website they came from. Few entries are made AND/OR many entries are not labeled with the website they came from or very difficult to read.
    • Evaluation(Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Score Creativity Several of the graphics or artwork used in the quilt reflect an exceptional degree of student creativity in their creation and/or display One or two of the graphics or artwork used in the quilt reflect student creativity in their creation and/or display. One or two graphics or artwork were made or customized by the student, but the ideas were typical rather than creative (.e.g, clip art without added embellishment). The student did not include any graphics or artwork in the quilt. Quality of Construction The quilt shows considerable attention to construction. All items are carefully and securely attached to each other. The patches are all the same size. The quilt shows attention to construction.All items are carefully and securely attached to each other. The patches are all the same size. The quilt shows some attention to construction. All items are securely attached to each other. The patches are approximately the same size. The quilt was put together sloppily. Items appear to be just "thrown together". Patches may be loose or hanging over the edges.The patches are noticeably different sizes. Presentation Preparedness The group is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. The group seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. The group is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. The group does not seem at all prepared to present. Listens to Other Presentations Listens intently. Does not make distracting noises or movements. Listens intently but has one distracting noise or movement. Sometimes does not appear to be listening but is not distracting. Sometimes does not appear to be listening and has distracting noises or movements.
    • Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest is designed for high school level students with basic computer skills. Students should work in groups and navigate through websites at their own pace. There is not a teacher script because this WebQuest is designed to be flexible and subject to modification as each teacher deems necessary for his/her students and classroom needs. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This WebQuest asks the overarching question: What could the United States have done differently to address the AIDS epidemic? In answering this question, students are challenged to enrich their basic understandings of HIV and AIDS and to research the history of the epidemic. Throughout the project, students are also challenged to make connections between multiple content areas (such as history and art) and apply other skills (such as teamwork and basic computer skills). This multi-disciplinary approach increases student understanding and retention while also allowing students who excel in other areas beyond science to be motivated to perform. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page All pictures from Flickr : dbking, austin tx, aJ GAZMEN- GucciBeaR, enric archivell This WebQuest was created from the WebQuest template available on The WebQuest Page For any updated versions of this Webquest or for other WebQuests go to The WebQuest Slideshare Group Thanks to Dr. Folkstead and the students of EDUC 331 Summer Term 2008 for all your help in creating my first WebQuest! Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion