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Greek Mythology Webquest

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Seventh Grade English Webquest

Seventh Grade English Webquest

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education

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  • 1. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for 7 th Grade English Designed by Erin Giacomelli Erin Giacomelli [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page
  • 2. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] The latest issue of The Daily Olympian needs to be published and you are responsible for getting the scoop, writing, and publishing a column on your favorite god or goddess. Get in there and find out what dirt you can dig up! Maybe they’re cheating on their spouse? Messing with mortals? Playing pranks? You never know what those crazy Olympians are up to…
  • 3. Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Your Assignment:
    • Research your assigned god or goddess in the library using books the internet, etc.
    • Create an article either on the computer or by hand, dishing out the scoop on your god or goddess.
    • In your article include symbols, pictures, and facts that go along with your god or goddess.
    • Draw a picture of your god or goddess by hand that corresponds to the information in your article.
    • Tools: Microsoft Publisher
    • Think: What is interesting about your god or goddess?
    Title
  • 4. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • First you will choose a god or goddess that interests you. Find your god or goddess here: Gods and Goddesses . No one can research the same god or goddess, each assignment will be given on a first-come, first-serve basis.
    • Once you’ve picked a god or goddess, do some research to find out more about them. Check out this site to search for more information. Here is a good place to look for myths about your god or goddess. Here are more places you can find information: Greek Mythology , Mythology Encyclopedia , Think Quest , Mythography .
    • Once you have found an interesting myth , read one of the tabloids on this site. Note how tabloids are written and what kind of voice comes out in tabloid writing.
    • You can now start to create your own tabloid using Microsoft Publisher.
    • Write a catchy headline at the top of your paper, catching your audience’s attention and explaining what your article is about.
    • Next write a short paragraph (using your “tabloid voice”) describing a myth or scandal that your god or goddess was involved in. Get creative! You can create a scandal story, a wanted ad, a sport section, or anything else that is interesting!
    • Be sure to include 5 facts about your god or goddess somewhere on the page.
    • Also include 3 pictures or symbols that relate to your story or god or goddess.
    • Lastly, print out your finished published paper.
    • On a blank piece of paper, draw your god or goddess by hand. Make this as colorful and catchy as possible!
  • 5. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. The information appears to be disorganized. 8) Diagrams & Illustrations Diagrams and illustrations are neat, accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are neat and accurate and sometimes add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are not accurate OR do not add to the reader's understanding of the topic.
  • 6. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Nice work!!! Now you have a feel for what it is like to do field work in the colorful world of journalism while learning about Greek gods and goddesses. Congratulations! To learn more about Greek mythology check out these books from the library: The Iliad The Odyssey The Oresteia
  • 7. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A special thanks to wikimedia for all of the images seen on this Webquest. Also to the following websites for material: http://www.greekmythology.com/ http://www.mythweb.com/ http://www.mythweb.com/encyc/index.html http://messagenet.com/myths/ http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/articles.html http://edweb.sdsu.edu/people/bdodge/scaffold/GG/greek_myth.html http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/ http://www.loggia.com/myth/content.html Here is a link to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so others can utilize the latest version of this template and training materials.
  • 8. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 7th Grade English Designed by Erin Giacomelli Erin Giacomelli [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 9. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson was developed as part of the San Diego Unified School District's Triton Project, a federally funded Technology Innovation Challenge Grant. In this lesson, students will be researching Greek gods and goddesses and then writing a Tabloid article dealing with their assigned god or goddess. They will also be drawing their god or goddess by hand. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 10. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is designed for seventh grade English but can incorporate aspects of Greek history. It would work well for 6 th , 7 th , or even 8 th graders, especially if the reading texts correspond with Greek mythology. Skills Needed: Proficient Reading/Writing Voice in Writing Creativity Drawing Technical Skills- (knows how to type and work on a computer) Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 11. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Students will gain a basic understanding of Greek culture and a basis for Greek texts studied in high school classes (such as The Iliad, The Odyssey, etc.) They will also learn how to create tone and voice in their writing and how to organize pictures and words on Microsoft Publisher.
    • English Standards Addressed:
    • Standard 1: Students read and understand a variety of materials
    • Standard 2: Students write and speak for a variety of purposes and audiences
    • Standard 5: Students read, to locate, select, and make use of relevant information from a variety of media, reference, and technological sources
    • Standard 6: Students read and recognize literature as a record of human experience.
    • Thinking Skills:
    • Creative production
    • Critical Reading
    • Analyzing Skills
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 12. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • First you will choose a god or goddess that interests you. Find your god or goddess here: Gods and Goddesses . No one can research the same god or goddess, each assignment will be given on a first-come, first-serve basis.
    • Once you’ve picked a god or goddess, do some research to find out more about them. Check out this site to search for more information. Here is a good place to look for myths about your god or goddess. Here are more places you can find information: Greek Mythology , Mythology Encyclopedia , Think Quest , Mythography .
    • Once you have found an interesting myth , read one of the tabloids on this site. Note how tabloids are written and what kind of voice comes out in tabloid writing.
    • You can now start to create your own tabloid using Microsoft Publisher.
    • Write a catchy headline at the top of your paper, catching your audience’s attention and explaining what your article is about.
    • Next write a short paragraph (using your “tabloid voice”) describing a myth or scandal that your god or goddess was involved in. Get creative! You can create a scandal story, a wanted ad, a sport section, or anything else that is interesting!
    • Be sure to include 5 facts about your god or goddess somewhere on the page.
    • Also include 3 pictures or symbols that relate to your story or god or goddess.
    • Lastly, print out your finished published paper.
    • On a blank piece of paper, draw your god or goddess by hand. Make this as colorful and catchy as possible!
    • This lesson is designed to be completed in a few days and can be done either in groups or individually. It is a fairly simple lesson plan and the students have fun doing computer work on their own. Students may have trouble finding myths and connections between gods, but this can be fixed with more research. This should be a fun project for everyone, and as a teacher you will only need to be an overseer!
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 13. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • For this lesson here are some things to take into consideration:
    • Class set of books focusing on a Greek myth (such as the Odyssey).
    • Available computers with the Microsoft Publisher program
    • Posters/Markers either provided by the school or the students
    • Printing capabilities for computers
    • One teacher can implement this lesson and is pretty self explanatory.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion http://www.greekmythology.com/ : has a good family tree to reference for Greek gods and has information about each god or goddess. http://www.mythweb.com/ : A good site to search for information about Greek gods and goddesses. http://www.mythweb.com/encyc/index.html : Has an encyclopedia of Greek gods. http://messagenet.com/myths/ : Has information about gods, heroes, and Greek myths, http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/articles.html : Has a larger encyclopedia of Greek gods and goddesses http://edweb.sdsu.edu/people/bdodge/scaffold/GG/greek_myth.html : Explains Greek vs. Roman mythology http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/ : Has access to Greek myths, stories, and legends http://www.loggia.com/myth/content.html : Information about gods, goddesses, creatures, and pictures can be found here.
  • 14. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page If this lesson is successful, student’s tabloid stories will coincide with actual myths, while adding a creative and interesting perspective of ancient myths and legends. End products will be colorful and it will be evident that the student had fun putting it together. Students will also display a deeper understanding of Greek culture and mythology. Rubric: Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion CATEGORY 4 3 2 1 Internet Use Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance. Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites. Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors. Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors A few grammatical spelling, or punctuation errors. Many grammatical, spelling, or punctuation errors. Organization Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings. Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs. Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed. The information appears to be disorganized. 8) Diagrams & Illustrations Diagrams and illustrations are neat, accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are accurate and add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are neat and accurate and sometimes add to the reader's understanding of the topic. Diagrams and illustrations are not accurate OR do not add to the reader's understanding of the topic.
  • 15. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Begin this lesson with a quick introduction to Greek Mythology. This can be done in a lecture dealing with Greek creation myths or a detailed account of a myth of your choice.
    • Next allow students to pick a god or goddess from a hat (or if they have a preference they can choose that).
    • Briefly explain to them the process of tabloid writing and an example of over-the-top journalism.
    • Then explain the assignment in detail (See Procedures Section) and get students familiar with Microsoft Word with a demo of the program.
    • Let students explore websites, images, and applications on Microsoft Publisher for at least one or two periods.
    • Once students have found interesting information on their god or goddess they can start to write their tabloid and find pictures.
    • Once their computer work is done and printed, on a separate paper they will be drawing an image of their god or goddess including at least two or three symbols of that god or goddess.
    • At the end students can read their articles to the class and post their pictures around the classroom.
    • A great follow-up novel would be The Odyssey. Students will be more familiar with gods, motives, and Greek culture and will make for a more interesting reading.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page This lesson is interesting and provides a creative outlet for students. They can gain confidence in doing research and working with media on the computer. It will also introduce students to over-the-top journalism and how to create a specific voice in their writing. Hopefully it will be a fun project for both students and teachers alike. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 17. [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. The following is a list of helpful sites and sites that the students will be using: Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion http://www.greekmythology.com/ http://www.mythweb.com/ http://www.mythweb.com/encyc/index.html http://messagenet.com/myths/ http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/articles.html http://edweb.sdsu.edu/people/bdodge/scaffold/GG/greek_myth.html http://www.pantheon.org/areas/mythology/europe/greek/ http://www.loggia.com/myth/content.html Great images can be found on wikimedia that comply with creative commons laws.