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Introduction to failover clustering with sql server
 

Introduction to failover clustering with sql server

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In this presentation we review the basic requirements to install a SQL Server Failover Cluster....

In this presentation we review the basic requirements to install a SQL Server Failover Cluster.

Regards,

Eduardo Castro Martinez
http://ecastrom.blogspot.com
http://comunidadwindows.org

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    Introduction to failover clustering with sql server Introduction to failover clustering with sql server Presentation Transcript

    • Introduction to Failover Clustering with SQLServer (Level 100)Eduardo Castro MartinezArquitecto Infraestructuraecastro@simsasys.comtwitter: edocastrohttp://ecastrom.blogspot.comhttp://tiny.cc/comwindows
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • What is High Availability?• The world is now a 24/7 global marketplace.• Systems must be online or customers are lost.• Goal of High Availability (HA) is to keep systems, applications, services, e-mail, databases, files, and printers always running.• Every business now has High Availability needs. Uptime Percentage Maximum downtime per year 99.999 5 minutes 99.99 52 minutes 99.9 8.7 hours 99 3.7 days
    • Why is HA Important?• Server downtime is unavoidable.• Keep your business running and competitive.• Servers may go offline due to:  Maintenance  Upgrade o Software or hardware  Update o Hot fix, security patch  Accident  Power outage  Disasters• Start planning now!
    • Failover Clustering• 2+ machines (nodes)• Redundancy everywhere (storage, network interface cards [NICs], host bus adapters [HBAs], Microsoft Windows® Server Multipath I/O [MPIO], etc.)• “Shared” storage accessible by all nodes• 1 node will host a HA application• Application writes data to “shared” storage
    • Failover Clustering• Nodes monitor health of other nodes.• If that node fails, health monitoring will cause a “failover” of the resource.• Another node starts the application and reads the last saved information from the shared storage.• Clients experience a slight interruption in service.
    • What is a Failover Cluster? Public HA Roles Shared Storage
    • Software Requirements• Failover Clustering is an in-box feature:  Windows Server® 2008 Datacenter and Windows Server 2008 R2 Datacenter  Windows Server 2008 Enterprise and Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise  Windows Server 2008 Enterprise and Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise for IA-64  Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V ™ technology  Windows Unified Data Storage Server• Architecture:  x64: up to 16 nodes  x86: up to 8 nodes (not in R2)  IA64: up to 8 nodes
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • Building Your Cluster• 2 or more computers (nodes)• 2 NICs and dedicated storage adapter  3rd NIC for iSCSI  HBA• 3 Networks  Public  Private (heartbeat)  Storage / iSCSI• Shared storage •HA Roles• Operating system, service, or application
    • Mix And Match Hardware• You can use any hardware configuration if  It passes Validate.  Each component has a “Certified for Windows Server 2008/R2” logo (servers, storage, HBAs, MPIO, device- specific modules [DSMs], etc.).• It’s that simple!  Connect your Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 logo’d hardware.  Pass every test in Validate (It is now supported!).  If you make a change, just re-run Validate.• Details: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=119949
    • Clustering Storage Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Supported Shared Bus Types:• SCSI-3 SPC-3 compliant SCSI Commands• Persistent Reservations (PRs)• Parallel-SCSI deprecated in 2008• Multipath I/O (MPIO) recommended• Basic GPT and MBR disks supported Fibre Channel iSCSI SAS
    • Networking• Key clustering component  Public network – clients  Private network – cluster communication  Storage network – nodes access “shared” storage• Multiple networks for added redundancy• IPv4/IPv6• DHCP or static IP addresses• Nodes can reside in different subnets
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • Software Configuration1. Install Windows Server 2008 R2.2. Install Failover Clustering feature on each node (If necessary, install other roles/features for server).3. Open the Failover Cluster Management.4. Run Validate a Cluster Configuration.5. To configure your cluster, run Create a Cluster Wizard.6. Make your applications highly available.
    • Validating a Cluster• For Microsoft support, cluster must pass the built-in Validate a Cluster Configuration (Validate) test• Run during configuration and/or after deployment (Best practices analyzed if run on configured cluster)• Series of end-to-end tests on all cluster components  Configuration information for support and documentation  Networking issues  Troubleshoot in-production clusters• More information http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=119949
    • demonstrationFailover Clustering Validation and Creation1. Configure hardware and storage.2. Install Failover Clustering feature on all nodes.3. Run Validate a Configuration Wizard.4. Run Create Cluster Wizard.
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • HA Roles and Features• Common • Other  Exchange  DFS-Namespace  File Server  DFS-Replication (R2)  Hyper-V  DHCP  Print  SQL  DTC  iSNS• Generic Containers  MSMQ  Generic Application  NFS  Generic Script  Remote Desktop (R2)  Generic Service  WINS  Other Server• 3rd Party  Many different roles
    • demonstrationHighly Available Resources1. Install the feature/role on all nodes.2. Configure workload for High Availability.3. Configure application or virtual machine.
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • What is Virtualization?• Create a virtual operating system on a physical machine (Hyper-V requires special hardware with hypervisor).• Allow multiple operating systems and non-compatible applications to exist on the same physical hardware.• Virtual machines (VMs) have resources dedicated to them such as disks, memory, processors, and networks.
    • The Virtual Data Center Vision• Virtualize your workloads• Consolidate servers• Reduce costs  Space/facilities  Cooling  Physical hardware  Maintenance• Easier management• HW flexibility• Quicker installations/deployments• Legacy operating systems/applications
    • The HA Virtual Data Center 1 x 2-Node Cluster | 8 VMs | 1 Role / VM Cluster
    • Hyper-V "Host" Clustering• Cluster physical machines (hosts).• The VMs are HA and can recover from crashes.• The VM fails over between host machines.• Most common configuration. VMs Physical “Host” Cluster
    • Hyper-V "Guest" Clustering• The VMs are clustered (guests).• The application within the VM is HA.• Recovers from guest operating system crashes. VMs VMs Virtual “Guest” ClustersStandalone host 1 Standalone host 2
    • Hyper-V "Hybrid" Clustering• Cluster the “hosts” and cluster the “guests”• HA VMs and HA application within the VMs VirtualPhysical Cluster 1 Cluster 1 Physical Cluster 2 VMs VMs Virtual Cluster 2
    • Hyper-V Quick Migration• Move a running VM from one host to another host• Little downtime while disk ownership of the VM moves• Client may be briefly disconnected• Planned failover• Supported in 2008 & R2
    • Quick Migration Client accessing VM Quick Migrate1. Save state of VM •SAN 4. Online Cluster Resources2. Offline VM & cluster resources 5. Start VM3. Move VM & cluster resources 6. Client reconnects •VHD
    • Hyper-V Live Migration• Move a running VM from one host to another host with no downtime.• Client is not aware of the migration.• Clients stay connected.• Keeps TCP connection between clients and VMs open.• Planned failover.  Failover clustering still recovers VM from a disk in an unplanned failover
    • Live MigrationEntire VM memory copied Memory content is copied to new server Live Migrate SAN May be additional incremental data copies until data on both nodes is essentially identical VHD
    • Live Migration Session state is maintained Client directed to new No reconnections necessary host Clients stay connected to “live” VM SANARP issued to point routing devices to new nodeOld VM deleted after success VHD
    • Agenda• High Availability• Hardware• Creating a failover cluster• HA workloads• HA virtual machines• Other considerations
    • Session Summary• Server downtime is inevitable.• Failover clustering keeps your applications running and recovers from disasters.• Buy certified solutions or reuse hardware.• Validate simplifies troubleshooting.• Cluster and HA workloads are easy to create.• Make almost anything HA.• Multiple management options.• VM integration and live migration support.
    • Want to see more?High Availability 101 with Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-Vhttp://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032407222&Culture=en- USFailover Clustering Feature Roadmap for Windows Server 2008 R2http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032407235&Culture=en- USInnovating High Availability with Cluster Shared Volumeshttp://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032407238&Culture=en- USMulti-Site Clustering with Windows Server 2008 Enterprise”http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/EventDetail.aspx?EventID=1032407242&Culture=en- US
    • For More Information, Go to:Cluster Team Blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/clustering/Cluster Information Portal: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/clustering-home.aspxClustering Technical Resources: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/clustering-resources.aspxClustering Forum (2008): http://forums.technet.microsoft.com/en-US/winserverClustering/threads/Clustering Forum (2008 R2): http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en- US/windowsserver2008r2highavailability/threads/Clustering Newsgroup: https://www.microsoft.com/technet/community/newsgroups/dgbrowser/en- us/default.mspx?dg=microsoft.public.windows.server.clusteringFailover Cluster Deployment Guide: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd197477.aspxTechNet: Configure a Service or Application for High Availability: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732478.aspxTechNet: Installing Failover Clustering: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772178.aspxTechNet: Create a Failover Cluster: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755009.aspxWebcast: Build High-Availability Infrastructures with Windows Server 2008 Failover Clustering (Level 300): http://msevents.microsoft.com/cui/WebCastEventDetails.aspx?EventID=1032364828&EventCatego ry=4&culture=en-US&CountryCode=US
    • Q&A
    • Introduction to Failover Clustering with SQLServer (Level 100)Eduardo Castro MartinezArquitecto Infraestructuraecastro@simsasys.comtwitter: edocastrohttp://ecastrom.blogspot.comhttp://tiny.cc/comwindows
    • © 2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.