Credit Flexibility - An Overview for Gifted Educators
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Credit Flexibility - An Overview for Gifted Educators

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An overview of Ohio's "credit flexibility" plan for high school credit for gifted educators by Eric Calvert, Co-Director, Learning|Connective.

An overview of Ohio's "credit flexibility" plan for high school credit for gifted educators by Eric Calvert, Co-Director, Learning|Connective.

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  • Mobile internet speeds doubling every year, expanding coverage. Majority of cell phones will be “smart” phones in next 2-3 years. In 2000, 1 billion people worldwide had cellphones. Now it’s 4 billion – ¾ of them are in developing countries. This year, the number of people with cell phones will surpass the number of people with reliable access to clean water.

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • Accelerating globalization of work, education, life
    • Automation of increasingly complex tasks (e.g. Ohio manufacturing output and employment trends)
    • Vertical disintegration, outsourcing of business = decline of lifetime employment, rise of small business
    • “ Model T” to “mass customization” and “long tail” economics
    • Exponential acceleration of scientific discovery, technological progress
    • Transition from education as phase of life to learning as unending part of life
  • 4.
    • Performance/$ of computers doubling every year. By time next year’s freshman leave college, same money buys PC 500X more powerful than today’s. $500 of computing power today will cost $1.
    • Virtually all of human knowledge available to everyone, everywhere, all the time, on demand
    • 21 st Century will see as much technological progress as previous 200 combined
      • 20 th Century’s worth of change by 2025
  • 5.
    • How can we predict the content that will have value to our students in the future?
    • If we can’t accurately predict, how can we “future-proof” the education we provide our students today?
  • 6.
    • Students must learn how to learn
      • Develop self-knowledge, ability to self-motivate, sense of personal responsibility for learning
      • Find, filter, and organize information
      • Find (or create) and work with learning communities of mentors and peers
      • Skill in using existing technologies for learning
      • Intrepid attitude toward mastering future technologies for learning and thinking
  • 7.
    • State level
    • School level
    • Student level
  • 8.
    • Ohio Core (SB 311) – Increased graduation requirements, mandates schools allow credit by demonstration of mastery beginning in 2010-2011
    • State level motives:
      • Increase graduation rate
      • Limit potential unintended consequences of increasing graduation requirements
        • Fewer graduates
        • Narrower curriculum
      • Promote “college and career readiness”
  • 9.
    • Traditional “Carnegie Unit” courses
    • “ Educational Options”
      • Mentorships, internships, and service learning
      • Online and hybrid courses
      • Independent studies
    • Demonstration of mastery
      • “ Testing out” and portfolio/performance based assessment
    • Any combination of the above
  • 10.
    • Expand options and opportunities, especially for smaller schools
    • Better serve “outlier” students
      • Interests
      • Learning styles
      • Readiness
    • Experiment with new instructional methods and technologies (w/o seat time constraints)
    • Leverage community resources
  • 11.
    • Personal responsibility for learning through:
      • Self regulation
      • Self knowledge
      • “ Habits of mind”
    • Develop “21 st Century” skills
      • Collaboration
      • Tech literacy
    • Develop talents, explore interests, and gain experience in chosen areas
  • 12.
    • Learn and progress at an appropriate accelerated pace
    • Connect with expert mentors and advanced peers
    • Develop time management and study skills, positive risk taking
    • Gain a competitive advantage for college admissions and scholarships
  • 13.  
  • 14.
    • Senior in CTE program
    • Family construction business
    • Diploma instead of dropout
  • 15.
    • “ Late bloomer”
    • College aspirations
    • Took 5 AP tests
  • 16.
    • Managing requests and referrals
    • Process for determining standards for awarding credit and grading
      • Consider “tiering” for weighted grades
    • Publicizing opportunities and communicating requirements
    • Responsibility for developing opportunities, promoting equity
    • Addressing costs
  • 17.
    • February 2010
      • ODE guidance
      • 5 Case studies
      • Highlights from states
    • March 2010
      • Soft launch of online community at SharedWork.org
    • Related
      • Performance-based assessment
      • Operating Standards revision
      • Content standards revision
      • EMIS adjustments
  • 18.
    • Attendance and progress monitoring
    • Charging fees
    • Athletic eligibility
      • OHSAA
      • NCAA (Rules, Core Course Look-up )
    • Early graduation
    • Assessment quality
  • 19.
    • Online Resources
      • Learning|Connective Credit Flex Site
        • Official documents
        • Sample policy template
        • Athletic eligibility information
    • OnlineEdOps Wiki
    • February 23 session with Fred Bramante on lessons from New Hampshire. See webinar details here.
  • 20.