NERM 2006: The Future of Scholarly Communications Introduction to  Scholarly Communications Elizabeth Brown [email_address...
Overview of Scholarly Communications <ul><li>Timeline for developments in Scholarly Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Evolu...
<ul><li>Timeline for developments in Scholarly Communications </li></ul><ul><li>1665 First scholarly journal published </l...
2. Evolution of Scholarship <ul><li>Manuscripts – hand-written, hand-lettered texts </li></ul><ul><li>Printed text </li></...
3.   What has driven this evolution? <ul><li>Academic: </li></ul><ul><li>Serials crisis of the early 1990’s – high journal...
3.  What has driven this evolution? <ul><li>Advocacy: </li></ul><ul><li>Greater awareness of copyright and intellectual pr...
4. Constituencies Affected by change   <ul><li>Scientists and scholarly researchers </li></ul><ul><li>Policymakers / Lawma...
5. Why should you care? How will this affect future research?   <ul><li>Immediate Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Quicker publ...
6.  Future trends in Scholarly Communications <ul><li>Make more government funded research publications available to the g...
7. Resources / Web Sites / Initiatives   <ul><li>SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) </li></ul><...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

NERM 2006: Introduction to the future of scholarly communication

1,109 views
1,013 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,109
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
42
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
49
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

NERM 2006: Introduction to the future of scholarly communication

  1. 1. NERM 2006: The Future of Scholarly Communications Introduction to Scholarly Communications Elizabeth Brown [email_address] Binghamton University Libraries Friday, October 6, 2006
  2. 2. Overview of Scholarly Communications <ul><li>Timeline for developments in Scholarly Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>What has driven this evolution? </li></ul><ul><li>Constituencies affected by change </li></ul><ul><li>Why should you care? How will this affect research? </li></ul><ul><li>Future trends in Scholarly Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Resources / Web Sites / Initiatives </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Timeline for developments in Scholarly Communications </li></ul><ul><li>1665 First scholarly journal published </li></ul><ul><li>1675 Introduction of peer review </li></ul><ul><li>1969 ARPAnet created (Birth of the internet) </li></ul><ul><li>1991 Creation of arXiv.org at Los Alamos </li></ul><ul><li>Early 1990s Science “serials crisis” </li></ul><ul><li>1995 First scholarly electronic journal online </li></ul><ul><li>1999-2000 Electronic journal archives available online </li></ul><ul><li>2002 Open Access movement begins </li></ul><ul><li>2006 Open Peer Review </li></ul>
  4. 4. 2. Evolution of Scholarship <ul><li>Manuscripts – hand-written, hand-lettered texts </li></ul><ul><li>Printed text </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic text adapted and converted from print </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic text “born digital” and converted to print </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic only text </li></ul>
  5. 5. 3. What has driven this evolution? <ul><li>Academic: </li></ul><ul><li>Serials crisis of the early 1990’s – high journal costs </li></ul><ul><li>Rise of interdisciplinary research </li></ul><ul><li>Channels of communication among researchers have changed </li></ul><ul><li>Technological: </li></ul><ul><li>Growth of the internet </li></ul><ul><li>Low cost of digitization of print materials </li></ul><ul><li>Open source software movement </li></ul><ul><li>Rise of Social Software and Web 2.0 tools </li></ul>
  6. 6. 3. What has driven this evolution? <ul><li>Advocacy: </li></ul><ul><li>Greater awareness of copyright and intellectual property rights </li></ul><ul><li>Movement to make publicly funded research available to all </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion on maintaining author rights to published research articles </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of institutional repositories – materials unique to a location </li></ul><ul><li>Need to have permanent archives for electronic materials </li></ul>
  7. 7. 4. Constituencies Affected by change <ul><li>Scientists and scholarly researchers </li></ul><ul><li>Policymakers / Lawmakers </li></ul><ul><li>Commercial and Society Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Librarians </li></ul><ul><li>Archivists </li></ul><ul><li>Information Technology / Computer Programmers </li></ul><ul><li>Students and General Public </li></ul>
  8. 8. 5. Why should you care? How will this affect future research? <ul><li>Immediate Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Quicker publication of research results: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faster recognition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wider distribution among colleagues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Lower journal costs for institution? (some debate) </li></ul><ul><li>Long-Term Benefits: </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional memory preserved – repositories and other local content </li></ul><ul><li>More control over scholarly output from authors and institutions </li></ul>
  9. 9. 6. Future trends in Scholarly Communications <ul><li>Make more government funded research publications available to the general public </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access option for journal article publishing available from more publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Newer alternative journal funding models as alternatives to Open Access </li></ul><ul><li>Greater collaboration between constituencies to make change </li></ul><ul><li>More demand to make scholarly research results available to more people </li></ul>
  10. 10. 7. Resources / Web Sites / Initiatives <ul><li>SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access News blog (Peter Suber) </li></ul><ul><li>Google Book Search </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Your Copyrights – Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Author Rights) </li></ul><ul><li>LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe) </li></ul><ul><li>Portico (Electronic Archiving) </li></ul><ul><li>Open Content Alliance (collaborative archive) </li></ul><ul><li>Open Peer Review & Collaboration (Heather Morris) </li></ul>

×