IEP DOCUMENT

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This document is provided courtesy of the First Nations Education Steering Committee and its author, Madeline Price-Pohlman

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IEP DOCUMENT

  1. 1. tion cial Educa About Spe … Talking Volume VI A Guide to Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for Teachers An Information Handbook Prepared by: The First Nations Education Steering Committee and the First Nations Schools Association April 2007
  2. 2. Talking About Special Education Volume VI: An Information Handbook updated by Madeline Price, FNESC Special Education Support. If you have further questions about IEPs or would like more information, please contact: First Nations Special Education at: 1.877.422.3672 © 2007 The First Nations Education Steering Committee and The First Nations Schools Association
  3. 3. TABLE OF CONTENTS Talking About Special Education Volume VI Inside: Introduction……………………………………….. 2 When Does a Student Require an IEP………... 2 Adapted and Modified Programs……………..... 5 Graduation………………………………………... 4 Preplanning………………………………………. 7 Establishing an IEP Team………………………. 7 IEP Meeting………………………………………. 8 Writing the IEP…………………………………... 10 Implementing the IEP…………………………… 12 Reviewing the IEP……………………………….. 13 Transitions………………………………………... 15 Reporting…………………………………………. 16 References……………………………………….. 17 Appendices A - Example of an Adaptation/Modification Sheet B - Example of a Blank IEP C - Example of a Mock IEP D - Parent IEP Planning Sheet
  4. 4. Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Introduction **The IEP supports students in areas where they The Individual Education Plan (IEP) is a valuable tool are experiencing difficulty, or areas where they are for planning and communicating with colleagues and exceeding expectations. parents. An IEP provides the opportunity for a student to progress at his/her individual learning pace in areas Adapted Program where they are experiencing difficulties. It is a written plan, developed for an individual student, which Many students are capable of achieving the goals of outlines student’s strengths and needs. Goals are the regular curriculum, but require some changes to the designed that are realistic and achievable. An IEP way they are taught or assessed. When a student has describes the program modifications and/or “program adaptations” the student is working at grade adaptations for the student and the services that are to level but has adaptations to support success. The IEP be provided. It is a concise, flexible and usable outlines program adaptations. The adaptations are document that summarizes a plan for the student’s provided so the student can participate successfully in education program. the program. The IEP is designed to be an enabling process. The document is developed from a positive perspective with Modified Program an understanding of the student strengths and needs. It is a document that sets the student up for success, and Some students may need more personal, individualized then provides opportunities to celebrate that success. goals that are different from, or in addition to those set The IEP is an ongoing “working” document. out in the regular curriculum. A modified program has learning outcomes that are not at grade level and are When Does a Student Require an IEP? substantially different from the prescribed curriculum. These modifications are specifically selected to meet In most cases an IEP is required when a student’s the student’s special needs. For example, a common program is either adapted or modified. modification for a student with special needs who is working significantly below grade level might be a **A student’s program may include some regular parallel curriculum designed at a much easier level for courses, as well as courses that are adapted and the student. others that are modified. **Learning Outcomes: are what students are expected **An IEP is usually not the student’s entire to know and be able to do by the end of a course or program. grade. Page 2 Page 3
  5. 5. Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Graduation Examples of Adaptations or Modifications The Dogwood Diploma is awarded to all students upon ** An example of a program adaptation/modification sheet is the successful completion of prescribed provincial included in the appendix. graduation requirements. Students with special needs whose programs are adapted are eligible to receive the • Instructional strategies, such as visual supports, Dogwood Diploma. spell checker, extra time, less written work; • Assessment procedures and different ways to The British Columbia School Completion Certificate is demonstrate learning such as oral exams, issued to all students who have met the goals and additional time, use of a scribe (someone to write objectives stated in their Individual Education Plans. If a the answers) or reader (someone to read the student has been on a modified program at the high material); school level, he or she will graduate with a British • Use of a computer with word processing, and spell Columbia School Completion Certificate. That check to support written output; certificate is not the same as a Dogwood Diploma. • Use of a computer for voice recognition to support Students with a BC School Completion Certificate will written output; not be able to take many post-secondary programs. • Use of a computer/scanner for reading material to support the student with a reading disability. **It is important that parents understand if their child has program adaptations or program **A student’s program may include some courses modifications in their IEP. that are modified and others that are adapted. ** Students that are on a modified program should have a complete Educational Assessment to ensure that their needs could not be met with regular program adaptations. **Students with a “learning disability” and other special needs are entitled to certain program adaptations that can support grade completion and high school graduation (this is called adjudication). These students must have a full Educational Assessment in place to qualify for these program adaptations. An IEP outlining the program adaptations must be in place. Page 4 Page 5
  6. 6. Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 The BC Performance Standards 1. Preplanning (http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/perfstands/) By the time it has been decided that a student requires an The BC Performance Standards describe key levels of IEP, some or all of the following steps should have taken achievement in Reading, Numeracy, Writing, and place: Social Responsibility. The Performance Standards help teachers and families understand when a student’s • Systematic assessment and evaluation by the work has met the expectations of the grade level. classroom teacher; • Consultation between the classroom teacher(s), the Note: Those areas in which the student is following parents, and school-based colleagues; the curriculum, without any adaptations or • Introduction of alternate strategies and evaluation of modifications, do not need to be included in the their effect; IEP process. • Referral to school-based team for specialized assessments and consultation. The intent of the IEP Once the student has been identified as having “special needs” a team should be formed to plan for the • To bring together a team of people who understand student’s educational needs. the student’s strengths and needs; • To develop a plan and provide an appropriate and 2. Establishing an IEP Team effective education for the student; • The IEP should set the student up for success. Depending upon the educational needs of an individual student, membership on the IEP team can vary. What the IEP should not be Participants of the team should include: • A bureaucratic process that eliminates key players; • Classroom teacher(s); • Separate reports that are presented to the key • Teacher assistants; players; • School administrator; • Forms filled out in isolation; • Parents or legal guardians; • A process without collaboration. • The student most times; • Other school-based and community/itinerant support staff who are going to be involved in the development and delivery of the IEP. Page 6 Page 7
  7. 7. Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 An IEP case manager should be assigned to Parental Involvement in Schools coordinate the development and implementation of the IEP. This includes: “In this complex world it takes more than a good school to educate children. • Organizing and chairing the IEP meetings; It takes more than a good home to educate children. • Ensuring the IEP documents are written and It takes these two educational institutions working distributed; together.” • Ensuring a regular process for monitoring progress is established; Dorothy Rich • Establishing a review date. A) Prior to the meeting When a student has multiple or severe needs, it is essential when possible, that community services, The case manager should provide ample notice of the such as public health and/or mental health, upcoming IEP meeting to all IEP Team members. educational specialists, speech and language Parents should be made aware of the meeting and who pathologists, and occupational/physical therapists will be attending. Prior to the meeting, it is helpful for the are part of the IEP team to ensure consensus parents to prepare for the meeting. See the appendix for regarding goals, consistency in interventions, and a sample of an IEP Planning Sheet for Parents. This an integrated approach to service delivery. form can be sent home to support parents in thinking about the types of goals they have for their child. 3. IEP Meeting The IEP process is new to many people, and as such, it is a process that needs to be explained to parents. Parents should be encouraged to be actively involved in the process regarding educational services for their children. They provide a unique perspective about the student’s personality, development and learning. Open communication and cooperation between home and school increases the opportunities for students with special needs to experience success. Page 8 Page 9
  8. 8. Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 The IEP should contain: B) At the meeting • Brief outline of past assessments and dates (both The following is a list of suggestions that will be helpful formal and informal assessments); in running the IEP meeting: • Current skills levels (what the student knows and • Introduce all members, and explain the process; can do); • Set the length of the meeting; • Degree of participation in the regular program, and • Follow a meeting plan (see appendix); areas that require adaptation/modification; • The IEP facilitator usually is the recorder; • Essential information, including relevant medical, • Compile the information on the IEP form; and school background; • Let the IEP team know that each participant will • How the student learns best; have a copy of the IEP available to them when • Student needs in the following areas: academic, completed. social/emotional, behavioural, physical ( ex. • Set a date for an IEP review (make this date a hearing, vision, fine motor etc), language/ realistic time frame in which the student can communication, life skills/work experience/career accomplish the outlined goals). The IEP review is a prep; time to evaluate student growth, celebrate the • Realistic and achievable student goals appropriate student’s accomplishments and put new goals in to the student in one or more of the above areas. place. (What the student will do to demonstrate learning); • Team responsibility for supporting the student goal, ** See document in appendix C IEP’s as Best Practice. and the strategies that will be put in place to support the student goal (where it will take place and for how long); 4. Writing the IEP • Documentation to show how progress will be measured towards each goal; The IEP guides the implementation of adaptations or • Adaptations and modifications to support the modifications to a student’s instructional program. It student goal. must be written in such a way that it can be understood • Review date; by all current and future team members. • Plans for the next transition. *** Remember that the IEP in most cases is not the ** In most cases 3-4 goals in an IEP is enough work student’s entire school program. The IEP outlines for the student and the IEP team to realistically key areas that require adaptation or modification to accomplish before the IEP review dates. *Sample the school program. IEP in appendix. Page 10 Page 11
  9. 9. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 5. Implementing the IEP 6. Reviewing the IEP The IEP is a working document and must be linked to At the IEP review meeting, the team comes together to ongoing instructional planning to be effective. The discuss the progress the student has made towards the student with special needs should be seen first as a IEP goals and to celebrate the student student in the class, and should not be defined accomplishments. Making the IEP review consistent exclusively by those special needs. The with a regular reporting period may be the most time implementation of the IEP is putting into practice the efficient manner. This will avoid having to hold separate plans, strategies and supports agreed upon by the IEP review and report card meetings and will provide team members. This usually includes one or more of the information required for the report card. the following: In some cases, students will require an IEP review • Implementing realistic and achievable goals; more often. Reviewing the IEP every 8-10 weeks can • Designing the adaptations to instruction and/or support student motivation and offers the IEP team assessment methods; more opportunity to monitor the student’s goals and • Designing modifications to the curriculum; provide a special time to celebrate success. • Carrying out the provision of support services; • Documenting student progress. As in the case of the first IEP meeting, the case manager should organize and chair the IEP review *If you would like FNESC Special Education Support to meeting. All team members should share information come to your First Nation school and demonstrate/ on strategies used and assessment results since the facilitate the IEP process please email the FNESC last meeting. At that time, the team may decide to carry Special Education Team kellyk@fnesc.ca to request a on with the current plan, change the goals or school visit. adaptations, or seek help from additional community resources. *The IEP review should provide an opportunity to celebrate the student’s accomplishments. Page 12 Page 13
  10. 10. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Questions that may assist with the review of Transitions the IEP include: Is a transition time occurring in the near future? • Has the IEP outlined realistic and achievable goals? Sometimes the IEP review meeting can also be a • Has the student succeeded in the outlined goals? transition meeting. • Are new goals ready to be put in place? • Have the strategies and resources been effective to Transitions can occur from home to school, one school support the student learning? or one level of schooling to another, and from school to • Should new goals be selected to more accurately independent or supported adult living. These transitions reflect the student’s changing strengths, needs and can be a very difficult and confusing time for students. interests? Before any transition takes place, the IEP team should meet to discuss the student’s plan and add If the goals have not been met, the following recommendations to the IEP. Such a review can help questions should be asked: communication between the student’s current teacher(s) and the receiving teacher(s), and ensure • Were the goals, materials, methods and procedures continuity of the programming for the student. The appropriate? transition process should be coordinated and • What gains did the student make? implemented well before the anticipated move. • Did the student assume some responsibility for his or her learning? *The transition/IEP meeting should include any • Did the support team members follow through on agencies expected to be involved with the student their responsibilities to support the student goal? and family in the new setting. • Did independence increase? ** Note in the appendix the Goal Accomplishment Sheet. This has been designed to keep track of the number of goals accomplished in one year, and the outlined student goal areas. Page 14 Page 15
  11. 11. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 7. Reporting References Reports for students with special needs should Some of this booklet was developed from the following describe progress with respect to all components of the resources: Individual Education Planning for Students program, including those areas that have been adapted with Special Needs - A Resource Guide to Support and/or modified. When a student is expected to Teachers. Prepared by the BC Ministry of Education, achieve or surpass the regular curriculum learning Special Programs Branch. outcomes, the same grading and reporting should be http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/specialed/iepssn/ followed as with other students. When the student ph: (250) 952- 4460 fax: (250)952-4431 requires substantial course or program modification, Toll-free within BC 1-800-282-7955 the use of letter grades or percentages to report Webpage: http://pss.online.gov.bc.ca/dcv/ student progress is not appropriate. Letter grades that reflect the goals in the IEP are appropriate, if it is clear The IEP process and the formatting has been that the program is modified. Structured written developed by Madeline Price, FNESC Special comments are very helpful to report the level of student Education Support. If you have questions about the IEP success in achieving the individual goals and process, examples of IEP’S, or how best to facilitate an objectives set out for him or her. IEP, please contact: The IEP should be used to report the level of student Madeline Price: 1-877-422-3672 success in achieving the individual goals set out for him madelinep@fnesc.ca or her. Or When the IEP team involves other community professionals that provide services for the student, Lisa Ellis such as a counselor, behaviour specialist, speech- First Nations Special Education Resource Line language pathologist, physical or occupational Toll-free: 1-877-547-1919 therapist, or vision teacher, this should be reflected in Call Monday to Thursday, 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. the IEP document, and in the IEP review. Page 16 Page 17
  12. 12. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 APPENDICES 1: Example of an Adaptation/ Modification Sheet Student:___________________ Date:_________________ ADAPTATIONS & MODIFICATIONS KEY: A = ADAPTED (Regular Grade Learning Outcomes With Accommodations/Adaptations) E/G = ENRICHED/GIFTED (i.e., Extended Learning Outcomes or Appendix A Advanced Level) Example of an Adaptation/ R = REGULAR (Grade Level Learning Outcomes: Content & Skills) Modification Sheet M = MODIFIED (“Substantially Different" from Regular) ADAPTATIONS/ACCOMMODATIONS needed for student to meet regular grade outcomes Accessibility: home-school communication access to all areas of school  program fire exits & routes  outside agency support  furniture & storage  reinforcement (class/group/ health & personal care  indiv) parking lot, roads & routines established & followed walkways  school counselling program  play areas & equipment  student contract/goal setting  showers, washrooms & teach/assignments at skill level fountains  teach & reinforce social skills  transportation to and from other: school  Equipment & Specialized other: Materials:   augmentative commun device Assignments & Homework: Braille machine/materials  alternate assignments or Calculator (large keys/reg./ format voice) length and/or number camera (digital/video) (decrease) Computer/word processor  partner or group computer printer/peripherals assignments fine/gross motor equipment time allowed (increase)  hearing aids/fm system other: headphones/listening centre Behaviour Management: Language Master & cards consequences — clear/ magnifier/lenses consistent  overhead projector expectations/rules —clear/ reference books consistent spell checker/grammar checker A1
  13. 13. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 standing frame/walker feedback immediate/frequent switches/adapted handles, practice guided/independent  etc. multisensory (oral/experiential/ tape recorder  written) wheelchair (reg./electric) memory (reduce/teach other: strategies) Organizational & Study pace quick/slow  short sessions/lessons  Strategies: teach key concepts/vocabulary bulletin board or chart other: reminders  class schedule/timetable, Testing & Evaluation: individual visual schedule  alternate setting/time   clock/timer/watch alternate test/format  desk/locker/tote tray time (increase/short sessions) (personal) furniture arrangement  open book/take home exams Appendix B oral (reader/scribe/tape)  routines for use of materials  programmed learning  Example of a Blank Individual student planner/home- school book rewriting permitted Education Plan spell check  teach organizational/study Word Processing skills speech recognition software other: scanning and reading software other: Reading, Writing & Note taking: alternate formats note taking: carbon copy/outline/ photocopy/taped notes  alternate formats reading: Braille/enlarged print/rebus/ tapes/videos/scanning software  alternate formats writing: computer/printing/ typewriter/word process, speech recognition software alternate materials/texts: easier reading level/parallel unit notetaker, reader and/or scribe (parent/peer/staff/ volunteer), speech recognition software  other: Teaching Strategies: advance organizers/key visuals alternate content/skills  demo/model processes/ product A2
  14. 14. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 APPENDICES 2: Example of a blank Individual STUDENT PROFILE Education Plan ASSESSMENT INFORMATION: Formal Assessment: SCHOOL Date Assessment Name Comments/ Recommendations Phone: Fax: Individual Education Plan Informal Assessment: SCHOOL YEAR (Classroom Based/Teacher Assessment) Date Assessment Name Comments/ Student: Recommendations DATE OF IEP MEETING: BIRTH DATE: CURRENT SKILL LEVELS: AGE: GENDER: R = Regular Program A = Adapted M = Modified Reading MAIL ADDRESS: Math GRADE: Writing Social Studies PHONE: Science PARENT/GUARDIAN: Physical Education Art/Woodwork Music Spelling School: Listening IEP Year : Student: Expressive Language B1 B2
  15. 15. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Strengths: FOUR COLUMN GOAL CHART (short term goals) Need Goal: Strategy and Team Measurement of Descriptors: (which of 6 Student Responsibility Progress above areas ) Learns Best When: Medical History: School History: AREAS OF NEED Requires only a check, or a brief two-three word description. ACADEMIC BEHAVIOURAL SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL SUPPORT TEAM Role Participant Contact LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION Name Information PHYSICAL Mother/Father LIFE SKILLS Teacher LONG TERM GOALS/DREAMS/DESIRES Principal Teacher Assistant WHAT DO WE WANT (Name) TO ACCOMPLISH THIS YEAR? Language Teacher FNESC Sp. Ed. Support Madeline Price madelinep@fnesc.ca FNESC Toll Free Resource lisae@fnesc.ca Lisa Ellis Line 1-877-547-1919 B3 B4
  16. 16. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 BASELINE MEASURE DOCUMENTATION Signatures: Baseline Review #1 Review #2 End of Year ________________________ _________________ Measure Measure (Parent/Guardian) (Date) ________________________ _________________ (Principal) (Date) Review Date: ______________________________________ IEP REVIEW DATE: ___________ ACCOMPLISHMENTS GOAL REVIEW TRANSITION PLAN B5 B6
  17. 17. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Adaptations & Modifications Equipment & Specialized Increasing Written Output: allow for a scribe or a tape to Materials fine/gross motor equipment record responses ****Highlighted = put into student program hearing aids/personal or establish the process for class fm system revision (first draft, sharing, headphones/listening centre revising, 2nd draft, sharing Language Master & cards 3rd draft, polishing, final, Accessibility: Teaching Strategies: publishing) access to all areas of school  advance organizers/key visuals magnifier/lenses overhead projector have student write ideas on fire exits & routes  alternate content/skills  post it notes and then furniture & storage  demo/model processes/product reference books spell checker/grammar rearrange them to make an health & personal care  feedback immediate/frequent outline  parking lot, roads & practice guided/independent  checker standing frame/walker teach keyboarding skills  walkways  multisensory (oral/experiential/ use an outline and 2 column play areas & equipment  written) switches/adapted handles, etc. notes for paragraph and essay showers, washrooms & memory (reduce/teach writing fountains  strategies) tape recorder  Wheelchair (reg./electric) use graphic organizers transportation to and from pace quick/slow  use the dot procedure (work to school  short sessions/lessons  other: _______________ the dot and get feedback) other:_______________  teach key concepts/vocabulary Reading, Writing & Note other: _________________   other: Assignments & Homework taking: alternate assignments or Organizational & Study alternate formats note tak- Testing & Evaluation format Strategies ing: carbon copy/outline/ alternate setting/time increased  length and/or number visual strategies (chart, black- photocopy/taped notes  alternate test/format  (decrease) board)  alternate formats reading: time (increase/short sessions) partner or group class /indiv visual schedule/ Braille/enlarged print/rebus/ open book/take home exams assignments timetable  tapes/videos  oral (reader/scribe/tape)  time allowed (increase)  concrete measures of time alternate formats writing: programmed learning  other: (timer/watch) computer/printing/ rewriting permitted colour-coded binders, etc. typewriter/word process recognize and give credit for Behaviour Management organized classroom set-up  alternate materials/texts: class participation  consequences — clear/ routines for use of materials  easier reading level/parallel review the grading process consistent  student planner/home-school unit before the test expectations/rules —clear/ book notetaker, reader and/or provide examples of criteria for consistent teach organizational/study skills scribe (parent/peer/staff/ each letter grade home-school program explicity volunteer)  allow student to retake test outside agency support  other: other: _______________ teach relaxation strategies  reinforcement (class/group/ provide sample items at the indiv) Equipment & Specialized Following Directions: beginning of the test routines established & provide only one or two provide visual graphic clues as Materials directions at a time  followed augmentative commun device the test directions change  school counselling program  restate directions in clear repeat directions to the student Braille machine/materials  simple language  student contract/goal calculator (large keys/reg./ once you have given them to setting  stand close to the student the class voice) and gain eye contact before teach/assignments at skill camera (digital/video) use take home tests for level giving directions practice computer processor  provide visual support for teach & reinforce social computer printer/peripherals  other: __________________ skills  directions (on students desk other: or on board   B7 B8
  18. 18. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 APPENDICES 3: Example of a mock Individual Education Plan ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Phone: Fax: Individual Education Plan Appendix C YEAR 2006-2007 Example of a Mock Individual Education Plan Student: Kobi Anderson DATE OF IEP MEETING: June 11, 2005 BIRTH DATE: September 4th, 1994 AGE: 11 GENDER M MAIL ADDRESS: Box 2220 Sechelt BC VON 3AO GRADE: 8 PHONE: 604-885-0000 PARENT/GUARDIAN: Victor and Gloria Anderson School: Pine Elementary IEP Year 2006-2007 Student: Kobi Anderson C1
  19. 19. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 STUDENT PROFILE STUDENT PROFILE ASSESSMENT INFORMATION: Formal Assessment: (Standard Scores) INFORMAL ASSESSMENT: Date Assessment Name Comments/ Recommendations (Classroom Based/Teacher Assessment) Weschler Recommendations: - Small group language Date Assessment Comments/ 2003 Intelligence Scale for Recommendations Children 111 (WISC) instruction (see handout) Name - Comprehension Strategies (see handout) Informal Teacher Comprehension Verbal-borderline Counsellor at school recommended 2X weekly. June 2005 Assessment/ needs to be Performance- Reading/Writing Observation supported by -Explicit teaching of average strategies for sensory activities prior, overload Unit tests at Grade 6 during and after - Visual calm down strategies level reading- Is working - Social story folder in a remedial literacy - Quiet place to ‘hang out’ class in the for sensory overload afternoons Bender Visual Motor - Include in timetable — extra computer/and wood June 2005 Informal teacher Enrolled in a Math 2003 Integration — work electives Math Assessment Mastery Skills * area of strength for Kobi Working at a - Mastery unit tests Program 2003 Weschler Individual - Include extra scaffolding Grade 3/4 level strategies for ‘inferential’ Achievement Test comprehension (see 2005 Projects Excels in these Reading-average handout PE/ classes (has 2 Math-SS-borderline - Stress/Add a ‘Life Skills’ Woodwork/ blocks of PE) One Writing-average to Math Program - Money Computer block is Physio — - Banking working on weights - Accounting program *See SLP handout ************************* 2003 Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test -Pre-teach vocabulary Requires rigid routine/TA Support, and Use as many visuals as accommodations in all areas (Receptive possible Language)- -Support “words with borderline double meanings” ************************ * Use Rewards Program 2004 Referral to Asante Centre for complete assessment C2 C3
  20. 20. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 AREAS OF NEED CURRENT SKILL LEVELS: R = Regular Program A = Adapted M = Modified ACADEMIC Math Skills: money, time, accounting; Reading for comprehen- A Reading sion; Practical Writing Skills M Math BEHAVIOURAL A Writing Protocol for managing behaviour outbursts; Strict routine to sup- port success A Social Studies SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL A Science Self Esteem; Confidence R Physical Education LANGUAGE COMMUNICATION Build skills in receptive and expressive language R Art/Woodwork PHYSICAL R Music Bilateral Hearing Loss (FM Systems in place) A Spelling LIFE SKILLS Work towards Communications 11 and 12; Math Essentials/ A Listening Accounting; Career Prep. and Job Support/ Work Experience A Expressive Language LONG TERM GOALS/DREAMS/DESIRES Strengths: Athletic (enjoys PE); likes to be helpful; enjoys music, To graduate Grade 12 and get a job ; To play on the Men’s Soc- art and woodwork; creative; likes to make things; can be cer Team after Grade 12 independent with a visual schedule; enjoys structure and routine; loves computers WHAT DO WE WANT KOBI TO ACCOMPLISH THIS YEAR? Descriptors: Hard working; good sense of humour; can be • To complete and master all literacy units volatile/anger triggers; likes to be independent but has trouble • To complete Grade 4 Saxon Math Program remembering- likes to have a concrete visual schedule; prints • To get to his Math and Literacy Class on time neatly; can be easily stimulated i.e. sensory system overloads- • To follow his outlined visual schedule requires a consistent calming quiet place • To try to remember using polite words Learns Best When: Has visual schedules for timetable and • To use his color coded binders/bins in the resource room routines; All program adaptations are in place; when feels • To put his breakfast food/dishes away in the resource room respected; in a quiet environment; 1 on 1 for new concepts; has a • To continue to take weights class and PE Class Learning Assistance Block; When language is spoken slowly, • To use his journal to record his feelings clearly, concretely and with few words (“get to the point)” with • To use his laptop for Social Stories personal feelings left out • To find his TA/Teacher when he feels he is “losing it” Medical History: Bilateral hearing loss; exposure to alcohol • To use the Resource Room as a calm place to rest prenatally, chronic congestion; Overactive Sensory System (not • To try to stay in his classes until they are finished on medication at this time) • If he feels tired, to go ask to go to the Resource Room • Morning routine: 7:30 in Resource Room, makes own School History: K—7 Pine Elementary breakfast, puts away materials C4 C5
  21. 21. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 FOUR COLUMN GOAL CHART (short term goals) FOUR COLUMN GOAL CHART (short term goals) Need Goal: Strategy and Team Measurement of Need Goal: Strategy and Team Measurement of (6 areas ) Student Responsibility Progress (6 areas ) Student Responsibility Progress Kobi will: CT’s will: CT will: Kobi will: CT’s (and TA’s) will: CT will: - Complete level 20 - Follow Kobi’s -Graph Kobi’s - Complete up to -Graph progress - Graph Kobi’s by next reporting protocol for all classes progress unit by level 14 by Oct. 28 visually progress unit by time Oct. 28 - Use a concrete unit - Work with his TA -Praise all efforts unit - Use LA time to measure of time to - Liaise with RR to be on time for all -liaise with RR - Liaise with RR complete help Kobi focus on Teacher, to help Math Classes Teachers Teacher to help assignments if assignments Kobi bring Kobi bring Academic needed - Chart his progress assignments to RR RR Teachers will assignments to RR Literacy - Hand in all so can visually see his for completion Math Liaise with CT’s for completion assignments into work completed support support the RED “IN” BOX - Support all program - RR teacher will For work completion in Ms K’s room adaptations, literacy check in with and focus on task– RR Teacher will: -Work with TA to strategies Literacy Teacher CT/TA will use -check in with be on time and support when concrete measures of Literacy Teacher needed time and support when needed Kobi will: CT’s will: -Anecdotal notes CT/TA will ensure all - Use his “calm - Direct Kobi to use his outlined program Home down” visual calm-down routines. adaptations are in communication support when he - Allow him to leave -Positive phone place: calculator, once weekly to feels upset/angry the room if he calls home recipe cards, advise of progress - Go directly to the chooses, must go reminder of calculation Resource Room directly to RR with TA process Behaviour (RR) if he is not - Use of concrete -Record of managing his measure of time behaviour/solution 1 on 1 support to behaviour well - Use the same worksheets check understanding - Remember to use language, “remember polite words/use your polite words” journal - Follow protocol, use of T charts Kobi will: TA will meet Kobi at Attendance/late Behaviour -work with his TA to the first bell and walk records by Late for Class get to class on time with him to class in classroom teacher time for second bell C6 C7
  22. 22. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN SUPPORT TEAM REVIEW DATE: Oct. 28th, 05 Role Participant Contact ACCOMPLISHMENTS Name Information Victor & Gloria Mother/Father Anderson Teacher Jane Doe GOAL REVIEW Principal John Smith Teacher Assistant (TA) TRANSITION PLAN Mary James Transition to Grade 9- in 2006-2007 Teacher/Hearing Imp. Plan Began in February 2006 Classroom Teacher (CT) BASELINE MEASURE DOCUMENTATION Music-Jay Raymond Baseline Review #1 Review #2 End of Year Classroom Teacher Language-Janice Measure Measure Smith Classroom Teacher Reading Level Reading Level Reading Level Reading Level 16 21 28 32 Gr. 6 Grade 6.5 Grade 7 Grade 7.5 Classroom Teacher Resource Room Teacher Math Level 12 Math Level 14 Math Level 20 Math Level 30 (RR) (end of Gr. 3) Grade 4 Grade 4.5 FNESC Sp. Ed. Support Madeline Price madelinep@fnesc.ca # of times late FNESC Toll Free Resource lisae@fnesc.ca for Math Class 20% 10% 10% Lisa Ellis Line 1-877-547-1919 80% # of times late for Literacy 20% 10% 2% Class 90% C8 C9
  23. 23. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI - IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Adaptations & Modifications Equipment & Specialized Increasing Written Output: Materials allow for a scribe or a tape to fine/gross motor equipment record responses ****Highlighted = put into student program hearing aids/personal or establish the process for class fm system revision (first draft, sharing, headphones/listening centre revising, 2nd draft, sharing Language Master & cards 3rd draft, polishing, final, Accessibility: Teaching Strategies: magnifier/lenses publishing) access to all areas of school  advance organizers/key visuals overhead projector have student write ideas on fire exits & routes  alternate content/skills  reference books post it notes and then furniture & storage  demo/model processes/product spell checker/grammar rearrange them to make an health & personal care  feedback immediate/frequent checker outline  parking lot, roads & practice guided/independent  standing frame/walker teach keyboarding skills  walkways  multisensory (oral/experiential/ switches/adapted handles, use an outline and 2 column play areas & equipment  written) etc. notes for paragraph and essay showers, washrooms & memory (reduce/teach tape recorder  writing fountains  strategies) Wheelchair (reg./electric) use graphic organizers transportation to and from pace quick/slow  other: _______________ use the dot procedure (work to school  short sessions/lessons  the dot and get feedback)   other:_______________  teach key concepts/vocabulary Reading, Writing & Note other: _________________ other: taking: Assignments & Homework alternate assignments or Organizational & Study alternate formats note tak- Testing & Evaluation ing: carbon copy/outline/ alternate setting/time increased  format Strategies photocopy/taped notes  alternate test/format  length and/or number visual strategies (chart, black- alternate formats reading: time (increase/short sessions) (decrease) board)  Braille/enlarged print/rebus/ open book/take home exams partner or group class /indiv visual schedule/ tapes/videos  oral (reader/scribe/tape)  assignments timetable  alternate formats writing: programmed learning  time allowed (increase)  concrete measures of time computer/printing/ rewriting permitted other: (timer/watch) typewriter/word process recognize and give credit for colour-coded binders, etc. Behaviour Management organized classroom set-up  alternate materials/texts: class participation  consequences — clear/ easier reading level/ review the grading process routines for use of materials  parallel unit before the test consistent  student planner/home-school expectations/rules —clear/ notetaker, reader and/or provide examples of criteria for book scribe (parent/peer/staff/ each letter grade consistent teach organizational/study skills home-school program volunteer)  allow student to retake test explicity other: _______________ teach relaxation strategies  outside agency support  other: reinforcement (class/group/ provide sample items at the Following Directions: beginning of the test indiv) Equipment & Specialized provide only one or two routines established & provide visual graphic clues as Materials directions at a time  the test directions change  followed augmentative commun device restate directions in clear repeat directions to the student school counselling program  Braille machine/materials  simple language  once you have given them to student contract/goal calculator (large keys/reg./ setting  stand close to the student the class voice) and gain eye contact before use take home tests for teach/assignments at skill camera (digital/video) giving directions practice level computer processor  teach & reinforce social provide visual support for other: __________________ computer printer/peripherals  directions (on students desk skills  or on board other:   C10 C11
  24. 24. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 APPENDICES 4: Parent IEP Planning Sheet IEP Planning Sheet for Parents Student Name:__________________________________________ Date: __________________________________________________ Parent’s Name: _________________________________________ To develop the best possible program, we need your assistance Appendix D and knowledge of your child. Below are some questions for you to think about in preparation for the IEP meeting. You may wish to Parent IEP Planning Sheet write down your thoughts for future reference by the IEP Team. What do you feel are the strengths of your child (in school, at home and in the community)? What do you feel are your child’s needs or weaknesses (e.g., areas that your child is struggling with and needs more support)? Is there any medical information that the team needs to know to better help your child at school (e.g.,requires glasses, hearing difficulties, fatigues easily, impulsivity problems, difficulties staying on task, becomes easily upset, irregular sleep patterns, allergies, medications etc.)? How do you think your child learns best (What kind of situation makes learning easiest)? Please describe educational skills that your child practices at home regularly (e.g., reading, making crafts, using the computer). D1
  25. 25. Talking About Special Education Volume VI VI- IEPs for Teachers, 2007 Does your child have any behaviours that are of concern to you or other family members? If so, please describe the behaviour(s). What are your child’s favorite activities? What are your child’s special talents or hobbies? Does your child have any particular fears? If so, please describe. Copyright © How does your child usually react when upset, and how do you deal with the behaviour? The First Nations Education Steering Do you have any particular concerns about your child’s school Committee program this year? and The First Nations Schools Association What are your main hopes for your child this year? 2007 What are your dreams for the future for your child? Is there other information that would help us gain a better understanding of your child? Are there any concerns that you would like to discuss at the next For additional copies, please write to: IEP meeting? Suite #113-100 Park Royal South West Vancouver, BC V7T 1A2 Email: fnesc@fnesc.ca Or download a copy at: www.fnsa.ca D2

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