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Reading  Purposes
 

Reading Purposes

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Students are introduced to the reading purposes. This is usually viewed at the beginning of a reading unit.

Students are introduced to the reading purposes. This is usually viewed at the beginning of a reading unit.

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  • Teacher reads the passage on frame 3 and thinks aloud the connections that come to mind as s/he thinks “This reminds me of. . .” (text-to-self = how passage reminds the teacher of something in his or her own life; text-to-text = how passage reminds the teacher of something s/he has read; text-to-world = how passage reminds the teacher of something that has happened in the world)
  • 1 From “Raymond’s Run” p. 32+, LOL, McDougal Littell 2. The teacher reads the passage aloud. 3. The teacher ‘thinks aloud’ as s/her read making connections to the text using “This reminds me of . . .” 4. The teacher and the students discuss the types of connections (to-self, to-another-text, or to-the-world).
  • From “Raymond’s Run” p. 32+, LOL, McDougal Littell Student partners read the passage silently. The partners jot down their connections to the text using “This reminds me of . . .” The partners share their thoughts with each other and then with the class.
  • From “Who are the Ninety Nines” p. 131+, LOL, McDougal Littell The teacher reads the title of the passage aloud. Using the two-column format, the teacher writes questions in the left column under “Questions”. The teacher then reads the passage aloud and models answering the questions. Write the answers under the “Answers” heading. NOTE: 2-Column notes may have various column headings: Opinion/Proof; Facts/Questions, Direct Quote/Personal Response; etc.
  • From “Who are the Ninety Nines” p. 131+, LOL, McDougal Littell Using the 2 Column Notes format, students write 2 or 3 questions that the information on the previous frame made them think of. They may use the term “I wonder. . .” to assist in thinking of questions to write. Students read the passage independently and write answers to their questions in the right hand column. Students share their questions and answers. NOTE: Explain that not all questions will be answered in the passage. Sometimes more reading & research about a topic is needed.
  • From “Paul Revere’s Ride” p. 717+ ,LOL, McDougal Littell Make copies of this frame, copy on the board, or make a transparency. The teacher reads this beginning of the poem. Model questioning by writing questions beside the words where you think of a question (Use question beginnings like “Who,” “What,” “Where,” “Why,” & “How”)
  • From “Paul Revere’s Ride” p. 717+ ,LOL, McDougal Littell Make copies of this frame, copy on the board, or make a transparency. Student partners read this beginning of the poem. Partners write questions beside the words where you think of a question (Use question beginnings like “Who,” “What,” “Where,” “Why,” & “How”) Partners share their questions (& possible answers) with another set of partners.
  • From “Paul Revere’s Ride” p. 717+ ,LOL, McDougal Littell Teacher and students discuss their questions and answers. Discuss a possible theme or poet’s point of view. (NOTE: The teacher may guide the students with the following: -Why does Longfellow address ‘my children’? -Why does Longfellow write ‘echo forevermore . . Borne on the night-wind of the Past’? Possible answer: The poet thinks that future generations can learn lessons from the past.
  • Teacher makes copies of the continuum for students. The facts are from “A Mother in Mannville,” p. 60+ ,LOL, McDougal Littell. In the story the time of the setting is not stated but the reader can infer it from the facts and the clues in the story. 3. Using the passage on frame 12, the teacher models making inferences about the time of the story’s setting. -Read the passage. --List or reveal the facts from the passage on the left side of the continuum. --narrator uses a typewriter ----orphanage ---narrator: woman with career --pay scale=10 cents per hour ---narrator drive a car ---gloves cost $1 --List or reveal things each reminds the reader of on the clues side of the continuum. ---typewriters used in recent past --orphanage: not common in U.S. today ---woman with a career not common before 20 th century ----pay scale & cost of gloves = not in the recent past ---narrator’s car: probably 20 th century --In the middle, write or reveal inferences based upon the facts and clues. (predictions, judgments, conclusions, etc.) --Infer that the setting is the early part of the 20 th century.
  • Teacher makes copies of the continuum for students. Student partners use the continuum to make inferences as they read “Mother to Son”, p. 193, LOL, McDougal Littell or another very short passage. Partners read the poem. Partners list facts from the poem Partners list things the facts remind them of under the clues side Partners make inferences about ---what the title tells the reader about the speaker ---what the reader learn about the speaker’s experiences ---what advice the speaker gives 6. The teacher monitors for accuracy. 7. Share inferences and reasons during the next day’s target time.
  • The teacher chooses a paragraph from a selection or a poem from ,LOL, McDougal Littell The teacher models this strategy by following the steps on the slide.(Note: The paper is folded top to bottom, not lengthwise.) On the next target time day, students follow the steps using a paragraph or short poem from LOL, McDougal Littell. The teacher monitors for accuracy.

Reading  Purposes Reading Purposes Presentation Transcript

  • Read for a variety of purposes
    • Read for a variety of purposes in all content areas and expect reading to make sense, to answer questions and to stimulate ideas
  • Reading for a purpose to answer questions and to stimulate ideas
    • Connections
    • Determining What is Important
    • Questioning
    • Inferences
    • Summarizations
  • Making Connections
    • Types of Connections
      • Text-to-Self
      • Text-to-Text
      • Text-to-World
  • Connections
    • Now some people (runners) like to act like things come easy to them, won’t let on that they practice. Not me. I’ll high-prance down 34 th Street like a rodeo pony to keep my knees strong even if it does get my mother uptight so that she walks ahead like she’s not with me, don’t know me, is all by herself on a shopping trip, and I am somebody else’s child.
  • Connections
    • I was once a strawberry in a Hansel and Gretel pageant when I was in nursery school and didn’t have no better sense than to dance on tiptoe with my arms in a circle over my head doing umbrella steps and being a perfect fool just so my mother and father could come dressed up and clap. You’d think they’d know better than to encourage that kind of nonsense.
  • Determining What is Important
    • “ Who are the Ninety-Nines?”
    • The Ninety-Nines, Inc., is an international organization of licensed women pilots from 35 countries with over 6,500 members throughout the world. The organization came into being November 2, 1929, at Curtiss Field, Valley Stream, Long Island, New York.
    • Twenty-six licensed pilots replied to an invitation issued in the form of a letter. Later, after rejecting many names the organization chose “The Ninety-Nines,” because 99of the 117 licensed women pilots in the United States at that time signed up as charter members.
    • Today, Ninety-Nines are professional pilots for airlines, industry, and government; they are pilots who teach. . . fly for pleasure,. . .But first and foremost, they are women who love to fly.
  • Questioning
    • Listen, my children, and you shall hear
    • Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
    • On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
    • Hardly a man is now alive
    • Who remembers that famous day and year.
    • He said to his friend, “If the British march
    • By land or sea from the town to-night,
    • Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
    • Of the North Church tower as a signal light,-
    • One if by land, and two if by sea;
    • And I on the opposite shore will be,
    • Ready to ride and spread the alarm. . .
    • . . .So through the night rode Paul Revere;
    • And so through the night went his cry of alarm
    • To every Middlesex village and farm,-
    • A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
    • A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
    • And a word that shall echo forevermore!
    • For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
    • Through all our history, to the last,
    • In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
    • The people will waken and listen to hear
    • The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
    • And the midnight message of Paul Revere.
  • Questioning
    • Read the questions asked about the last two frames.
    • Read any answers you wrote.
    • Use these questions and answers to infer what the poet was saying about history? (What is the poet’s statement or theme?)
  • Making Inferences FACTS BACKGROUND CLUES INFERENCES
  • FACTS Background Clues INFERENCES
  • Summarizing
    • Fold a sheet of paper in half.
    • Read the paragraph or short poem.
    • On the top half of the paper, write
      • Questions you think of
      • Predictions
      • Important ideas
      • Visual images
    • Close the book that contains the passage.
    • Using the notes that are written on the top part of the paper, write two or three sentences that tells what the passage was about.