Grammar - Adverb + Adjective; Noun + Noun

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Adverb + Adjective; Noun + Noun

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Grammar - Adverb + Adjective; Noun + Noun

  1. 1. adverb + adjective noun + noun
  2. 2. adverbs can indicate strength
  3. 3. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. very ) before an adjective (e.g. cold ) to make the adjective stronger </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. very ) before an adjective (e.g. cold ) to make the adjective stronger </li></ul>It was cold .
  5. 5. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. very ) before an adjective (e.g. cold ) to make the adjective stronger </li></ul>It was cold . It was very cold .
  6. 6. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. very ) before an adjective (e.g. cold ) to make the adjective stronger </li></ul>It was cold . It was very cold . We get a better understanding of just how cold it was by using an adverb
  7. 7. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. very ) before an adjective (e.g. cold ) to make the adjective stronger </li></ul>stronger We were very tired after the trip. I felt extremely nervous after the exam. I’m really angry with you. examples:
  8. 8. adverbs can show weakness
  9. 9. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. quite ) before an adjective (e.g. tired ) to make the adjective weaker </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. quite ) before an adjective (e.g. tired ) to make the adjective weaker </li></ul>She was tired .
  11. 11. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. quite ) before an adjective (e.g. tired ) to make the adjective weaker </li></ul>She was tired . She was quite tired .
  12. 12. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. quite ) before an adjective (e.g. tired ) to make the adjective weaker </li></ul>She was tired . She was quite tired . We get a better understanding of just how tired she was by using an adverb
  13. 13. <ul><li>We can use an adverb (e.g. quite ) before an adjective (e.g. tired ) to make the adjective weaker </li></ul>Our car is fairly old . (It’s old, but isn’t very old.) The meal was quite nice . (It was nice, but not wonderful.) It was rather late when we arrived. (It was late, but not extremely late.) examples:
  14. 14. multiple adjectives may be used
  15. 15. <ul><li>When we use multiple adjectives together, we always put the opinion adjectives (e.g. wonderful , beautiful , etc.) before any others (e.g. new , warm ) </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>When we use multiple adjectives together, we always put the opinion adjectives (e.g. wonderful , beautiful , etc.) before any others (e.g. new , warm ) </li></ul>examples: a wonderful new product a lovely warm day a beautiful little cottage a horrible green shirt opinion
  17. 17. size adjectives give more details
  18. 18. <ul><li>We use size adjectives (e.g. big , tall ) before an adjective that gives other information, for example its age ( new , old ), its color, or its shape ( thin , round ) </li></ul>
  19. 19. examples: We use size adjectives (e.g. big , tall ) before an adjective that gives other information, for example its age ( new , old ), its color, or its shape ( thin , round ) a big new product a small warm day a huge little cottage a large green shirt size
  20. 20. finally
  21. 21. nouns can act like adjectives
  22. 22. We can use two nouns together. The first noun is like an adjective and give information about the second noun .
  23. 23. examples: We can use two nouns together. The first noun is like an adjective and give information about the second noun . a cardboard box a cassette tape a check book an alarm clock noun + noun
  24. 24. <ul><li>works cited </li></ul><ul><li>Coe, Norman, Mark Harrison, and Ken Paterson . Oxford Practice Grammar Basic with Answers . Oxford, England: Oxford </li></ul><ul><li>University Press, 2006. </li></ul>

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